Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 57 items for

  • Author or Editor: Chick Weisse x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To determine survival times in dogs with right atrial hemangiosarcoma treated by means of pericardectomy and tumor resection, with or without adjuvant chemotherapy, and identify complications associated with treatment.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—23 dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were included only if the diagnosis was confirmed histologically.

Results—The most common initial complaints included acute collapse (8 [35%] dogs), anorexia or inappetence (8 [35%]), and lethargy (8 [35%]). The most common physical examination abnormalities included muffled heart sounds (12 [52%] dogs), tachycardia (7 [30%]), and weak pulses (7 [30%]). Postoperative complications developed in 12 (52%) dogs; however, most complications were minor. Twenty (87%) dogs were discharged from the hospital. Survival time was significantly longer in the 8 dogs that received adjuvant chemotherapy (mean, 164 days; median, 175 days) than in the 15 dogs that did not receive chemotherapy (mean, 46 days; median, 42 days). Dogs that received chemotherapy were significantly younger and had significantly lower WBC counts than did dogs that did not receive chemotherapy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that in dogs with right atrial hemangiosarcoma, surgical resection of the tumor was associated with a low complication rate and complications that did arise typically were minor. In addition, use of adjuvant chemotherapy following resection was associated with significantly longer survival times, compared with resection alone. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:575–579)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe the technique and short- and long-term outcomes for dogs undergoing double-pigtail ureteral stent placement for treatment of benign ureteral obstruction.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 44 dogs (57 ureters).

PROCEDURES Medical records of dogs that underwent ureteral stenting for treatment of benign ureteral obstruction between 2010 and 2013 were reviewed. Signal-ment, history, pertinent diagnostic imaging results, endourologic and post-procedural details, duration of hospitalization, complications, and outcome (short term, 7 to 30 days; long term, > 30 days) were recorded. Ureteral stent placement was performed endoscopically, surgically, or both, with fluoroscopic guidance.

RESULTS 57 ureters (44 dogs) underwent stenting because of obstructive ureterolithiasis (n = 48 [84%]), stricture (5 [9%]), or both (4 [7%]). Endoscopic or surgical techniques were successful for stent placement in 45 of 55 and 12 of 12 ureters (34/42 and 10/10 dogs), respectively. Median hospitalization time was 1 day. Median creatinine concentration was 2 mg/dL prior to stenting and 1.3 mg/dL 3 months after the procedure. Urinary tract infections were present in 26 of 44 (59%) dogs prior to stenting and in 11 of 43 dogs (26%) after stenting. One of the 44 (2%) dogs died after undergoing stenting, but the cause of death was not related to the procedure. Median follow-up time was 1,158 days (range, 3 to > 1,555 days), with 30 of 44 dogs alive at the time of last follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that ureteral stenting may be a viable option for first-line treatment of dogs with benign ureteral obstruction. However, patients should be monitored for urinary tract infection following stenting.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 14-week-old 7.7-kg (16.9-lb) sexually intact female Golden Retriever was evaluated because of urine dripping from the caudoventral aspect of the abdomen.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Ultrasonography, radiography, excretory CT urography, and vaginocystourethroscopy were performed. Results indicated eversion of the bladder through the ventral abdominal wall with exposure of the ureterovesicular junctions, pubic diastasis, and an open vulva and clitoral fossa. Clinical findings were suggestive of bladder exstrophy, a rare congenital anomaly.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME The dog was anesthetized and bilateral ileal osteotomies were performed. Two ureteral catheters were passed retrograde into the renal pelves under fluoroscopic guidance. The lateral margins of the bladder, bladder neck, and urethra were surgically separated from the abdominal wall, and the bladder was closed, forming a hollow viscus. The symphysis pubis was closed on midline with horizontal mattress sutures. The defects in the vestibule and clitoral fossa were closed. Lastly, the iliac osteotomies were stabilized. The dog was initially incontinent with right hind limb sciatic neuropraxia and developed pyelonephritis. Over time, the dog became continent with full return to orthopedic and neurologic function, but had recurrent urinary tract infections, developed renal azotemia likely associated with chronic pyelonephritis, and ultimately was euthanized 3.5 years after surgery because of end-stage kidney disease.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Bladder exstrophy and epispadias is a treatable but rare congenital abnormality. The procedure described could be considered for treatment of this condition, but care should be taken to monitor for urinary tract infections and ascending pyelonephritis.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—5 dogs, 1 goat, and 1 horse underwent percutaneous endovascular retrieval of intravascular foreign bodies between 2002 and 2007.

Clinical Findings—Foreign bodies were IV catheters in 4 dogs, the horse, and the goat and a piece of a balloon valvuloplasty catheter in 1 dog. Location of the foreign bodies included the main pulmonary artery (1 dog), a branch of a pulmonary artery (4 dogs), the right ventricle (the goat), and a jugular vein (the horse).

Treatment and Outcome—The procedure of percutaneous endovascular retrieval of the foreign body was easy to perform in all instances. One dog was euthanized 41 days after retrieval because of worsening of another disease process, and 1 dog had abnormal neurologic signs secondary to a brain mass. All other animals were clinically normal during the follow-up period (follow-up duration, 3 to 57 months). None of the animals developed long-term complications secondary to the foreign body retrieval procedure.

Clinical Relevance—Intravascular foreign bodies that result from catheters or devices used during minimally invasive techniques are rare but may cause substantial morbidity. Percutaneous endovascular retrieval of intravascular foreign bodies was easily and safely performed in the 7 animals reported here. Use of percutaneous endovascular retrieval techniques should be considered for treatment of animals with intravascular foreign bodies because morbidity can be substantially decreased; however, proper selection of patients for the procedure is necessary.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION 3 ferrets (Mustela putorius furo), aged 1 to 2 years, were referred for evaluation of a 4-day to 2-week history of gastrointestinal signs, including anorexia, regurgitation, and vomiting.

CLINICAL FINDINGS All 3 ferrets had clinical signs suggestive of dysphagia or esophagitis on initial examination. Esophagoscopy, barium-contrast esophagography, or both revealed foreign bodies with mucosal inflammation in 1 patient and an esophageal foreign body with stricture in 2 patients. One of the latter ferrets had a recent history of gastrotomy to remove a foreign body.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME 1 ferret was treated with endoscopic retrieval of the foreign bodies. Esophageal stricture was treated in 2 ferrets by means of endoscopic balloon dilation accompanied by placement of an esophageal stent in 1 ferret. After resolution of clinical signs and completion of all prescribed treatments, 2 of 3 ferrets successfully transitioned to a regular hard kibble diet; 1 ferret remained on a soft diet for 2 years. All owners were satisfied with the outcome of treatment.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Ferrets are prone to foreign body ingestion. Results of this small series of cases suggested that minimally invasive techniques may be useful for the management of esophageal disease in this species.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome associated with use of a balloon-expandable metallic stent for treatment of nasopharyngeal stenosis in dogs and cats.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—3 dogs and 3 cats.

Procedures—All 6 animals had severe inspiratory stertor at initial examination. Two animals had no orifice present at the stenosis. Nasopharyngeal stenosis was diagnosed and stent size determined by use of computed tomography. A percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon premounted with a balloon-expandable metallic stent was placed over a guidewire, advanced through the stenotic lesion under fluoroscopic and rhinoscopic guidance, and dilated to restore patency.

Results—All animals had immediate resolution of clinical signs after stent placement. The procedure took a median of 38 minutes (range, 22 to 70 minutes). One animal with a stenosis located far caudally needed the tip of the stent resected because of hairball entrapment and exaggerated swallowing. Both animals without an orifice in the stenosis had tissue in-growth requiring a covered stent. All animals were reexamined 6 to 12 weeks after treatment via rhinoscopy, radiography, computed tomography, or a combination of techniques. All animals lacked signs of discomfort; 5 of 6 were breathing normally 12 to 28 months after the procedure.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Transnasal balloon-expandable metallic stent placement may represent a rapid, safe, noninvasive, and effective treatment in animals with nasopharyngeal stenosis. If the stenosis is extremely caudal in the nasopharynx, serial balloon dilatation might be considered prior to stent placement. A covered stent should be considered initially if the stenosis is completely closed.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the outcome of minimally invasive ureteral stent placement for dogs with malignant ureteral obstructions.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—12 dogs (15 ureters) with ureteral obstruction secondary to a trigonal urothelial carcinoma.

Procedures—In all patients, indwelling, double-pigtail ureteral stents were placed by means of percutaneous antegrade needle and guide wire access under ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance.

Results—Stents were successfully placed in all patients. In 11 of 12 patients, percutaneous antegrade access was accomplished. One patient required access via laparotomy because percutaneous access could not be achieved. The median survival time from the date of diagnosis was 285 days (range, 10 to 1,571 days), with a median survival time of 57 days (range, 7 to 337 days) from the date of stent placement. Three complications occurred in 1 patient. Seven patients required concurrent urethral stent placement for relief of urethral obstruction. All animals were discharged from the hospital (median hospitalization time after stent placement, 18 hours [range, 4 hours to 7 days]) with an indwelling, double-pigtail ureteral stent (3 bilateral and 9 unilateral) in place. All stents evaluated 0.25 to 11 months after placement were considered patent.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings suggested that ureteral stent placement was safe, effective, and well tolerated in patients with malignant ureteral obstructions. Stents could be reliably placed in a minimally invasive manner and remain patent long-term. Ureteral stent placement should be considered as early as possible in patients with neoplasia, prior to the development of permanent renal damage.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine outcome for dogs and cats with benign nasopharyngeal stenosis or an imperforate nasopharynx that underwent balloon dilatation or metallic stent placement.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 15 dogs and 31 cats.

PROCEDURES Medical records were retrospectively reviewed, and data on signalment, history, clinical signs, lesion location, treatment, and outcome were obtained. Patients were excluded if < 6 months of follow-up information was available.

RESULTS 5 dogs and 22 cats underwent balloon dilatation, and results were successful in 11 (0 dogs and 11 cats) of the 27 (41%). Stents were placed in 34 patients (including 15 in which balloon dilatation had been unsuccessful). Uncovered stents were placed in 30 patients, and results were successful in 20 (67%). Covered stents were placed in 11 patients (including 7 in which uncovered stent placement was unsuccessful), and results were successful in all 11. Twenty-three of the 34 (68%) patients in which stents were placed developed complications. The most common complications were tissue ingrowth (n = 10), chronic infection (7), and stent fracture (5) for the 30 patients with uncovered stents and chronic infection (8) and oronasal fistula (3) for the 11 patients with covered stents. Overall, outcome was successful in 36 of the 46 (78%) patients (median follow-up time, 24 months; range, 2 to 109 months).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that in dogs and cats, nasopharyngeal stenosis and imperforate nasopharynx can be successfully treated with balloon dilatation or stent placement, but that there was a high risk of failure with balloon dilatation alone and a high risk of complications regardless of procedure.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe techniques and outcomes for dogs and cats undergoing endoscopic nephrolithotomy (ENL) for the removal of complicated nephroliths.

ANIMALS

11 dogs and 1 cat (n = 16 renal units) with complicated nephroliths that underwent ENL via a surgically assisted ENL approach (12 renal units) or a percutaneous nephrolithotomy approach (4 renal units) between December 2005 and June 2017.

PROCEDURES

Data were obtained from the medical records regarding preoperative, operative, and postoperative findings. Follow-up information on complications and outcomes was also collected.

RESULTS

Indications for nephrolith removal included massive calculi displacing parenchyma (n = 7), recurrent urinary tract infections (5), and ureteral outflow obstruction (4). Median nephrolith diameter was 2.5 cm (range, 0.5 to 5.7 cm). Nephrolith composition differed among patients; calcium oxalate was the most common type (n = 7 [including 2 mixed nephroliths containing ≥ 60% calcium oxalate]). Following ENL (median duration, 180 minutes), 15 of 16 renal units were completely nephrolith free. Procedure-related complications included renal puncture-associated hemorrhage requiring a blood transfusion (n = 1), renal capsule tear (1), and ureteral puncture (1); all were managed without adverse consequence. Five of 12 patients remained alive at the final follow-up (median, 557 days after ENL), and none died from the procedure.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

ENL as performed was safe and effective in removing complicated nephroliths in a renal-sparing manner for the patients in this study. This procedure requires technical training and could be considered for the treatment of complicated nephrolithiasis in dogs and possibly cats.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association