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Abstract

Objective—To investigate risk factors for development of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) in horses.

Design—Case-control study.

Animals—251 horses admitted to The Ohio State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital from 1992 to 1995.

Procedure—On the basis of clinical signs of neurologic disease and detection of antibody to Sarcocystis neurona or S neurona DNA in cerebrospinal fluid, a diagnosis of EPM was made for 251 horses. Two contemporaneous series of control horses were selected from horses admitted to the hospital. One control series (n = 225) consisted of horses with diseases of the neurologic system other than EPM (neurologic control horses), and the other consisted of 251 horses admitted for reasons other than nervous system diseases (nonneurologic control horses). Data were obtained from hospital records and telephone conversations. Risk factors associated with disease status were analyzed, using multivariable logistic regression.

Results—Horses ranged from 1 day to 30 years old (mean ± SD, 5.7 ± 5.2 years). Risk factors associated with an increased risk of developing EPM included age, season of admission, prior diagnosis of EPM on the premises, opossums on premises, health events prior to admission, and racing or showing as a primary use. Factors associated with a reduced risk of developing EPM included protection of feed from wildlife and proximity of a creek or river to the premises where the horse resided.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Development of EPM was associated with a number of management-related factors that can be altered to decrease the risk for the disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1174–1180)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome of equids in the western United States with clinical signs of West Nile virus (WNV) infection and identify factors associated with risk of death in infected equids.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—484 equids in Nebraska and Colorado.

Procedure—Owners of 484 equids with laboratoryconfirmed West Nile virus infection in Nebraska and Colorado were contacted by telephone, and a questionnaire was used to obtain information on signalment, management, clinical signs, date of disease onset, duration of disease, WNV vaccination status, and health status at the time of the interview.

Results—137 of 482 (28.4%) animals died or were euthanatized. Ataxia, lethargy, muscle fasciculations, and weakness were the most common clinical signs of disease. Animals ≥ 3 years old were more likely to die than were animals ≤ 2 years old. Unvaccinated equids were twice as likely to die as were animals that had been vaccinated at least once prior to the onset of disease. Animals that were recumbent and unable to rise were 78 times as likely to die as were animals that never lost the ability to rise. Females were 2.9 times as likely to die as males. Two hundred seventy-one of 339 (79.9%) animals that survived recovered fully; mean duration of disease for these animals was 22.3 days.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Among equids with WNV infection, age, vaccination status, an inability to rise, and sex were associated with the risk of death. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:267–274)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To investigate risk factors for use in predicting clinical improvement and survival of horses with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM).

Design—Longitudinal epidemiologic study.

Animals—251 horses with EPM.

Procedure—Between 1992 and 1995, 251 horses with EPM were admitted to our facility. A diagnosis of EPM was made on the basis of neurologic abnormalities and detection of antibody to Sarcocystis neurona or S neurona DNA in CSF. Data were obtained from hospital records and through telephone follow-up interviews. Factors associated with clinical improvement and survival were analyzed, using multivariable logistic regression.

Results—The likelihood of clinical improvement after diagnosis of EPM was lower in horses used for breeding and pleasure activities. Treatment for EPM increased the probability that a horse would have clinical improvement. The likelihood of survival among horses with EPM was lower among horses with more severe clinical signs and higher among horses that improved after EPM was diagnosed.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Treatment of horses with EPM is indicated in most situations; however, severity of clinical signs should be taken into consideration when making treatment decisions. Response to treatment is an important indicator of survival. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1181–1185)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess the impacts of the introduction of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and various FMD control programs in southern Thailand.

Animals—A native population of 562,910 cattle and 33,088 buffalo as well as 89,294 animals legally transported into southern Thailand.

Procedures—A quantitative risk assessment was used to ascertain the probability of FMD introduction, and an intrinsic dynamic model was used to assess impacts. Value for the transmission rate (β) was estimated. Five scenarios created to assess the impacts of nonstructural protein (NSP) testing, mass vaccination, and culling were examined. Impacts were assessed through an examination of the estimated annual cumulative incidence (ACI) of FMD. The ACIs of various scenarios were compared by use of the Tukey Studentized range technique.

Results—β was estimated at 0.115. Approximately 35,000 cases of FMD would be expected from the baseline situation. A 30% reduction of ACI was detected with the introduction of NSP antibody testing. Prophylactic vaccination resulted in an 85% reduction of ACI. Concurrent use of NSP antibody testing and vaccination reduced the ACI by 96%, and the addition of an eradication policy resulted in a slightly greater decrease in the ACI (98%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The study used epidemiologic models to investigate FMD control interventions. Results suggested that vaccination has more impact than the use of NSP testing. Use of the NSP test reduced ACI during peak seasons, whereas vaccination diminished the underlying incidence. The best mitigation plan was an integrated and strategic use of multiple control techniques.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the ability of orally administered aspirin to mitigate 3-methylindole (3MI)-induced respiratory tract disease and reduced rate of gain in feedlot cattle.

Animals—244 beef cattle.

Procedure—In a masked, randomized, controlled field trial, calves were untreated (controls) or received a single orally administered dose of aspirin (31.2 g) on entry into a feedlot. Serum 3MI concentrations were measured on days 0, 3, and 6. Rumen 3MI concentration was measured on day 3. Cattle were observed daily for clinical signs of respiratory tract disease. Lungs were evaluated at slaughter for gross pulmonary lesions.

Results—Mean daily gain (MDG) in cattle treated with aspirin, compared with control cattle, was 0.06 kg greater in the backgrounding unit and 0.03 kg greater for the overall feeding period. Neither serum nor rumen 3MI concentrations appeared to modify this effect. Cattle treated with aspirin were more likely to be treated for respiratory tract disease. Mortality rate, gross pulmonary lesions, and serum and rumen 3MI concentrations were similar between groups. Increased rumen 3MI concentration was associated with a small difference in risk of lung fibrosis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cattle given a single orally administered dose of aspirin on feedlot entry had higher MDG in the backgrounding unit and for the overall feeding period, but this finding could not be attributed to mitigation of effects of 3MI. This may have been influenced by low peak 3MI production and slow rates of gain. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1209–1213)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate bacterial and protozoal contamination of commercially available raw meat diets for dogs.

Design—Prospective longitudinal study.

Sample Population—240 samples from 20 raw meat diets for dogs (containing beef, lamb, chicken, or turkey), 24 samples from 2 dry dog foods, and 24 samples from 2 canned dog foods.

Procedure—Each product was purchased commercially on 4 dates approximately 2 months apart. Three samples from each product at each sampling period were evaluated via bacterial culture for non–type-specific Escherichia coli (NTSEC), Salmonella enterica, and Campylobacter spp. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on selected isolates. Polymerase chain reaction assays were used to detect DNA from Cryptosporidium spp, Neospora spp, and Toxoplasma spp in samples obtained in the third and fourth sampling periods.

Results—One hundred fifty-three of 288 (53%) samples were contaminated with NTSEC. Both raw and prepared foods contained NTSEC during at least 1 culture period. Salmonella enterica was recovered from 17 (5.9%) samples, all of which were raw meat products. Campylobacter spp was not isolated from any samples. In 91 of 288 (31.6%) samples, there was no gram-negative bacterial growth before enrichment and in 48 of 288 (16.7%) samples, there was no aerobic bacterial growth before enrichment. Susceptibility phenotypes were variable. Cryptosporidium spp DNA was detected in 3 samples.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Bacterial contamination is common in commercially available raw meat diets, suggesting that there is a risk of foodborne illness in dogs fed these diets as well possible risk for humans associated with the dogs or their environments.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether immunity against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) mitigates the effects of 3-methylindole (3MI) on occurrence of bovine respiratory tract disease (BRD) and rate of gain in feedlot cattle.

Animals—254 mixed-breed beef cattle.

Procedure—Cattle were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups at the time of arrival at the feedlot. One group was vaccinated with an inactivated BRSV vaccine, another was vaccinated with a modified-live BRSV vaccine, and the third was maintained as unvaccinated control cattle. On days 0 and 28, serum BRSV antibody concentrations were measured, using serum neutralizing and ELISA techniques. Serum 3MI concentrations were measured at feedlot arrival and 3 days later. Cattle were monitored for development of BRD. At slaughter, lungs were evaluated grossly for chronic lesions.

Results—Higher serum 3MI concentrations early in the feeding period were associated with lower mean daily gain. Control cattle were more likely to be treated for BRD after day 3, compared with cattle vaccinated with the modified-live BRSV vaccine. Humoral immunity against BRSV did not appear to modify the effect of 3MI on development of BRD or mean daily gain.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that abrogating the effects of 3MI and BRSV infection may improve the health and growth performance of feedlot cattle. However, in this study, immunity against BRSV did not appear to protect against the potential synergism between 3MI and BRSV infection, possibly because of the slow rates of gain of cattle included in the study or timing of sample collection. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1309–1314)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess the likelihood of an introduction of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) into the Malaysia-Thailand-Myanmar (MTM) peninsula through terrestrial movement of livestock.

Animals—89,294 cattle and buffalo legally moved into the MTM peninsula.

Procedures—A quantitative risk assessment was conducted by use of a stochastic simulation. Patterns of livestock movement were ascertained through review of relevant governmental records and regulations and by interviewing farmers, traders, and local officers when the records did not exist. Parameters identified in the process were the probabilities of livestock having FMD and of FMD infection going undetected during import processes. The probability of an animal accepted for import having FMD was also assessed. Sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the effects that each parameter had on the model.

Results—The simulation yielded an average consignment prevalence of 10.95%. Typically, each animal in a quarantine facility had a 2.7% chance of having an inapparent form of FMD infection; hence, it was likely an animal would not be identified as infected. Findings revealed that the mean probability of an animal accepted for import having FMD was 2.9%, and the risk was as high as 11%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of the model allowed for the evaluation of movement regulations currently imposed in the MTM peninsula. Evidence from the study suggested that current practices in animal movement were far from efficient in preventing introduction of FMD-infected animals into the MTM region, and additional measures will be necessary.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) was associated with racing performance in Thoroughbred horses not medicated with furosemide and not using nasal dilator strips.

Design—Observational cross-sectional study.

Animals—744 two- to 10-year-old Thoroughbred horses racing in Melbourne, Australia.

Procedure—Horses were enrolled prior to racing, and a tracheobronchoscopic examination was performed after 1 race. Examinations were recorded on videotape, and presence and severity (grade 0 to 4) of EIPH were subsequently determined by 3 observers blinded to the horses' identity. Race records were abstracted for each horse examined.

Results—Overall, 52.1% of horses eligible for participation in the study were examined, and horses that were examined did not differ from horses that were not examined in regard to age, sex distribution, or proportion of horses that won or finished in the first 3 positions. Horses with EIPH grades ≤ 1 were 4.0 times as likely to win, 1.8 times as likely to finish in the first 3 positions, and 3.03 times as likely to be in the 90th percentile or higher for race earnings as were horses with grades ≥ 2. Horses with EIPH grades ≥ 1 finished significantly farther behind the winner than did horses without EIPH. However, odds that horses with grade 1 EIPH would win or finish in the first 3 positions were not significantly different from odds for horses without EIPH.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that EIPH is associated with impaired performance in Thoroughbred racehorses not medicated with furosemide and not using nasal dilator strips. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:768–774)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the interobserver variability of assessment of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) during tracheobronchoscopic examination in horses.

Animals—747 Thoroughbred racehorses.

Procedure—850 tracheobronchoscopic examinations were performed within 2 hours of racing for the horses. Examinations were recorded on videotape, and EIPH and its severity were assessed independently by 3 veterinarians. Concordance was determined by calculation of the Cohen weighted κ statistic and tabulation of scores assigned by each observer.

Results—Weighted κ statistics ranged from 0.75 to 0.80. In 99.4% of observations, all observers agreed or 2 of 3 agreed and the third differed by ≤ 1 grade.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that interobserver reliability of tracheobronchoscopic assessment of EIPH in Thoroughbred racehorses is high when the examination is conducted by experienced veterinarians. Concordance among investigators is sufficient to justify use of this grading system for further studies and clinical descriptions of EIPH. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:596–598)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research