Search Results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 64 items for

  • Author or Editor: Alicia L Bertone x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION 4 horses were examined because of signs of chronic hind limb lameness.

CLINICAL FINDINGS 3 horses had a history of lameness for > 6 months; specific duration was unknown for 1 horse. On initial evaluation, grade 3 to 4 (on a scale from 1 to 5) hind limb lameness was present in all 4 horses. Radiography of the stifle joint of the affected limb revealed medial femoral condyle subchondral lucencies or subchondral cystic lesions (SCLs) in all 4 horses, medial femorotibial osteoarthritis in 3 horses, and medial tibial condyle SCLs in 3 horses.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME 2 horses were treated medically (stall rest and oral NSAID administration), and 2 horses were treated surgically by means of medial femoral transcondylar lag screw placement through the medial femoral condyle SCLs. The 2 horses treated medically did not improve and were euthanized. Necropsy confirmed the presence of medial femoral condyle and medial tibial condyle SCLs. Surgical treatment did not resolve the lameness in 1 horse with SCLs in the medial tibial condyle and medial femoral condyle, and euthanasia was performed 150 days after surgery. In the second horse, a medial tibial condyle SCL was evident on radiographs obtained 3 months after surgery; however, this was not addressed surgically, and signs of lameness resolved 11 months after surgery.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this small case series suggested that SCLs in the medial tibial condyle can occur in association with SCLs of the medial femoral condyle, with a poor prognosis for return to athletic function in affected horses. Further investigation is indicated.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To provide quantitative assessment of forces affecting filtration of synovial fluid in response to incremental changes in arterial and venous hemodynamics.

Animals

7 clinically normal adult horses.

Procedure

Using a stationary, isolated metacarpophalangeal joint preparation, blood flow (Qacir), tissue perfusion, arterial pressure (Pacir), venous pressure (Pvcir), transsynovial fluid flow, total vascular resistance, vascular compliance, and tissue compliance were evaluated before and after arterial and venous pressure manipulations. At isogravimetric conditions, pre- and postcapillary resistance and ratios, osmotic reflection coefficient (σd), capillary pressure, net filtration pressure, and transitional microvascular pressure were determined.

Results

Synovial tissue blood flow was similar before, immediately after, and 3.5 hours after joint isolation. The σd for the joint was low, owing to the high oncotic pressure of synovial fluid at filtration-independent states. Transsynovial flow occurred in preference to lymph flow because of the high permeability of synovial tissue (low σd). Synovial fluid production and transfluid flow (synovium weight gain) increased at Pacir > 200 mm of Hg, indicating a threshold phenomenon for synovial filtration. Net filtration pressure > 6 mm of Hg is needed to effect an increase in synovial fluid flow, and pressure of approximately 11 mm of Hg is necessary to increase lymphatic flow. Vascular compliance in the joint was low, but increased markedly with Pvcir. Vascular and tissue compliance increased with increased Pacir. Vascular compliance changes caused by increased arterial pressure were minimal, compared with those caused by increased venous pressure owing to the greater elastance of arteries and the larger muscular arterial wall.

Conclusion

This isolated joint preparation permitted evaluation of codependent hemodynamic, microvascular, and transsynovial flow responses to hemodynamic manipulations. Synovial tissue permeability was markedly affected by increased vascular forces altering filtration pressures toward synovial fluid production. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:495–503)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the effect of topically applied dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced synovitis in the mid-carpal joint.

Animals

6 sound, healthy, adult horses (12 carpi).

Procedure

In a double-blinded, crossover, paired study with a 1-week washout period, mid-carpal joints were allocated to group 1 (DMSO, n = 6) or group 2 (control, n = 6). Each joint was injected with 1.3 ml (0.0125 ng/dl) of LPS to induce synovitis. For group-1 joints, DMSO gel (15 g; 90%) was applied after injection of LPS and at 12-hour intervals for 60 hours. Joints of group 2 received LPS, but not DMSO gel. All horses were evaluated by serial lameness examinations and synovial fluid analyses (total and differential WBC count and total protein concentration) at 12- hour intervals for 60 hours after LPS injection. Plasma and synovial fluid were obtained at baseline and 36 hours to document presence of DMSO.

Results

Mean WBC concentration was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in group-1, compared with group-2 joints, at 24 hours and had a trend to be lower at 36 hours. Mean total neutrophil count was significantly lower in group-1, compared with group-2 joints at 24 hours. In group-1 joints, DMSO was detected by use of gas chromatography in the synovial fluid of 5 of 6 joints and in plasma from 1 of 6 horses.

Conclusion

Topically applied DMSO penetrated into synovial fluid in sufficient quantities to be detected and to decrease joint inflammation. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:1149-1152)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the effect of high-molecular weight (MW) dextran macromolecules on low-flow ischemia and reperfusion of the large colon in horses.

Design

Horses subjected to low-flow ischemia and reperfusion of the large colon were treated with either 0.9 NaCI (group 1, n = 6) or high-MW dextran (group 2, n = 6) solutions.

Animals

12 adult horses.

Procedure

Horses were subjected to 3 hours' low-flow ischemia followed by 3 hours' reperfusion. A dose of either 0.9% NaCI or a 6% solution of high-MW (250,000) dextran (10 ml/kg of body weight) was administered IV, 30 minutes prior to reperfusion. Hemodynamic variables were recorded at 30-minute intervals. Systemic arterial and colonic venous blood were collected for determination of PCV, plasma total protein, and whole blood lactate concentrations, and for blood gas and oximetry analyses. Histologic examination of large-colon biopsy specimens was performed.

Results

Mean arterial pressure was greater in group-2 horses, compared with group-1 horses, from 3 to 3.25 hours, but there were no significant differences between groups for any of the other hemodynamic variables. Compared with baseline values, colonic blood flow was significantly lower from 0.5 to 3 hours and was significantly greater from 3.25 to 6 hours. Arterial and colonic venous PCV were significantly lower than baseline values from 3 to 3.25 hours, and at 3 hours, respectively, in group-2 horses. These values were significantly lower in group-2 horses, from 3 to 6 and 3 to 5 hours, respectively. There was significant mucosal necrosis, hemorrhage, edema, and neutrophil infiltration in horses of both groups; however, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups.

Conclusions

High-MW dextran did not protect the colonic mucosa from low-flow ischemia and reperfusion; there were no deleterious effects on colonic mucosa or on systemic hemodynamic or metabolic variables.

Clinical Relevance

Reperfusion with high-MW dextran solution probably would not protect the large colon from ischemia-reperfusion injury associated with large-colon volvulus. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1067–1073)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To quantitate nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in healthy and interleukin 1β (IL-1β)-exposed equine synovial membrane.

Animals

6 healthy horses, 2 to 8 years old.

Procedure

Recombinant human IL-1β (0.35 ng/kg of body weight) was injected intra-articularly into 1 metacarpophalangeal joint of each horse. The contralateral joint served as an unexposed control. All horses were euthanatized 6 hours after injection of IL-1β, and synovial membrane specimens were assayed for NOS activity by measuring conversion of arginine to citrulline. Severity of inflammation was semiquantitated by analysis of synovial fluids and histologic examination of synovial membrane.

Results

Equine synovial membrane had minimal NOS activity. A significant difference was not detected in NOS activity between control and IL-1β-exposed specimens. Histologic examination revealed a neutrophilic infiltrate in synovial membrane exposed to IL-1β. Synovial fluid from IL-1β-exposed joints had a moderate inflammatory response and significantly greater concentrations of IL-1β and interleukin-6 than fluid from healthy joints.

Conclusion

Healthy equine synovial membrane had low NOS activity that was not affected by exposure to IL-1β. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:714-716)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Cardiovascular responses to sublethal endotoxin infusion (Escherichia coli, 50 μg/ml in lactated Ringer solution at 100 ml/h until pulmonary arterial pressure increased by 10 mm of Hg) were measured 2 times in 5 standing horses. In a 2-period crossover experimental design, horses were either administered hypertonic (2,400 mosm/kg of body weight, iv) or isotonic (300 mosm/kg, iv) NaCl solution after endotoxin challenges. Each solution was administered at a dose of 5 ml/kg (infusion rate, 80 ml/min). Complete data sets (mean arterial, central venous, and pulmonary arterial pressures, pulmonary arterial blood temperature, cardiac output, total peripheral vascular resistance, heart rate, plasma osmolality, plasma concentration of Na, K, Cl, and total protein, blood lactate concentration, and pcv) were collected at 0 (baseline, before endotoxin infusion), 0.25, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, and 4.5 hours after initiation of the endotoxin infusion. Blood constituents alone were measured at 0.5 hour and cardiovascular variables alone were evaluated at 0.75 hour. By 0.25 hour, endotoxin infusion was completed, a data set was collected, and saline infusion was initiated. By 0.75 hour, saline solutions had been completely administered.

Mean (± sem) cardiac output decreased (99.76 ± 3.66 to 72.7 ± 2.35 ml/min/kg) and total peripheral resistance (1.0 ± 0.047 to 1.37 ± 0.049 mm of Hg/ml/min/kg) and pulmonary arterial pressure (33.4 ± 0.86 to 58.3 ± 1.18 mm of Hg) increased for both trials by 0.25 hour after initiation of the endotoxin infusion and prior to fluid administration. For the remainder of the protocol, cardiac output was increased and total peripheral resistance was decreased during the hypertonic, compared with the isotonic, saline trial. Cardiac output was decreased and total peripheral resistance was increased during the isotonic saline trial, compared with baseline values. Both trials were associated with increased blood lactate concentration, but lactate values during the isotonic saline trial were greater and remained increased above baseline values for a longer period (4 hours) than during the hypertonic saline trial (2.5 hours). It was concluded for this model of endotoxemia, that iv administered hypertonic saline solution was associated with more-desirable cardiovascular and metabolic responses than was an equal volume of isotonic saline solution.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the efficiency of a novel point-of-care gravitational marrow separator and bone marrow aspiration needle for concentrated bone marrow production and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) separation and assess the effect of repeated bone marrow collections in horses.

Animals—8 healthy adult horses.

Procedures—Bone marrow aspiration was performed twice (1 month apart) from sternebral bodies with a standard or prototype multidirectional needle. Concentrated bone marrow was obtained by gravitational marrow separation and evaluated for WBC and platelet counts, automated and cytomorphologic cell differential counts, MSCs, and cell viability.

Results—Concentrated bone marrow samples obtained with the marrow separator had 5- to 19-fold bone marrow-derived MSC, WBC, and platelet counts, compared with original bone marrow samples. Use of a multidirectional needle increased the frequency of obtaining MSC-richer concentrated bone marrow. Repeating bone marrow aspiration at 1 month yielded greater MSC numbers but slightly lower cell viability after processing.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The gravitational bone marrow separator and multidirectional needle were used to effectively harvest bone marrow and improve the quality of concentrated bone marrow. Comparable, or even greater, numbers of bone marrow-derived MSCs were collected by repeated bone marrow aspiration after a 1-month interval from the same aspiration sites. Use of the marrow separator and multidirectional bone marrow aspiration needle can facilitate a 1-step, point-of-care, nonlaboratory method to obtain concentrated bone marrow as a mixture of bone marrow-derived MSCs and growth factors from platelets and plasma.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To analyze the effects of vertical force peak (VFP) of repition within trials and between trial sessions in horses with naturally occurring appendicular lameness.

ANIMALS 20 lame horses acclimated to trotting over a force plate.

PROCEDURES Kinetic gait data were collected by use of a force plate regarding affected and contralateral limbs of lame horses that completed 5 valid repetitions in each of 5 sessions performed at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours, constituting 1 trial/horse. Data were compared within and among repetitions and sessions, and factors influencing VFP values were identified.

RESULTS VFP values differed for lame limbs after 3 valid repetitions were performed within a session and when the interval between sessions was 3 hours. Direction of change reflected less lameness (greater VFP). Lamer horses (≥ grade 4/5) had this finding to a greater degree than did less lame horses. Results were similar for contralateral limbs regarding valid repetitions within a session; however, VFP decreased when the interval between sessions exceeded 6 hours. The coefficient of variation for VFP was ≤ 8% within sessions and ≤ 6% between sessions. The asymmetry index for VFP did not change throughout the study.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Lameness profiles obtained through kinetic gait analysis of horses with naturally occurring lameness were most accurate when valid repetitions were limited to 3 and the interval between sessions within a trial was > 3 hours. Findings suggested that natural lameness may be as suitable as experimentally induced lameness for lameness research involving horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Effects of low-flow ischemia and reperfusion of the large colon on mucosal architecture were determined in horses. Twenty-four adult horses were randomly allocated to 3 groups: sham-operated (n = 6), 6 hours of ischemia (n = 9), and 3 hours of ischemia and 3 hours of reperfusion (n = 9). Low-flow ischemia was induced in horses of groups 2 and 3 by reducing colonic arterial blood flow to 20% of baseline values. Systemic hemodynamic and metabolic variables were maintained constant and in a normal physiologic range. Full-thickness biopsy specimens were obtained from the left ventral colon for histomorphologic and morphometric examination at baseline and at 30-minute intervals for 6 hours; additional biopsy specimens were collected at 185, 190, and 195 minutes (corresponding to 5-, 10-, and 15-minute periods of reperfusion in group-3 horses). There were no differences among groups at baseline or across time in group-1 horses for any of the histopathologic variables. There were significant (P < 0.05) increases in percentage of surface mucosal disruption, estimated and measured percentage depth of mucosal loss, mucosal hemorrhage, mucosal edema, and cellular debris index during 0 hour to 3 hours, compared with baseline, and from 3 hours to 6 hours, compared with 3 hours in horses of groups 2 and 3. Estimated percentage depth of mucosal loss and cellular debris index were significantly (P < 0.05) greater in group-3 horses, compared with group-2 horses during the interval from 3 to 6 hours. There were trends toward greater percentage of surface mucosal disruption and mucosal edema during the early phase of reperfusion (3 to 4 hours) and greater mucosal hemorrhage, measured percentage depth of mucosal loss, and mucosal interstitial-to-crypt ratio during the late phase (4 to 6 hours) of reperfusion in group-3 horses vs group-2 horses. Reestablishment of colonic arterial blood flow after low-flow ischemia caused greater mucosal injury than did a comparable period of continued ischemia. Thus, reperfusion injury was detected in the large colon of horses after low-flow arterial ischemia. The serial mucosal alterations that developed in the colon were comparable in horses of groups 2 and 3; however, reperfusion exacerbated colonic mucosal injury.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Histomorphologic/morphometric evaluation, leukocyte scintigraphy, and myeloperoxidase activity were used to determine whether neutrophils accumulate in the large colon of horses during low-flow ischemia and reperfusion. Twenty-four adult horses were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: group 1, sham-operated (n = 6); group 2, 6 hours of ischemia (n = 9); and group 3, 3 hours of ischemia and 3 hours of reperfusion (n = 9). Low-flow ischemia of the large colon was induced in horses of groups 2 and 3 by reducing colonic arterial blood flow to 20% of baseline. Radiolabeled (99mTc) autogenous neutrophils were injected at 175 minutes, which corresponded to 5 minutes prior to reperfusion in group-3 horses. Full-thickness biopsy specimens of the left ventral colon were collected at baseline and at 30-minute intervals for 6 hours; a portion of the biopsy specimen was placed in formalin for histologic examination, and the remainder was used to measure mucosal radioactivity and myeloperoxidase activity. There were no differences in baseline mucosal neutrophil index, mucosal neutrophil numbers, submucosal venular neutrophil numbers, mucosal radioactivity, or mucosal myeloperoxidase activity among groups, or over time in group-1 horses. Neutrophils accumulated in the colonic mucosa during ischemia and further increased at reperfusion, as indicated by neutrophil index (morphology) and mucosal neutrophil numbers (morphometry); mucosal neutrophil index was significantly (P < 0.05) greater in group-3 horses during reperfusion than at the corresponding periods of ischemia in group-2 horses. Neutrophil numbers were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in submucosal venules at 10 minutes of reperfusion in group-3 horses and were significantly (P < 0.05) greater in group-3 than in group-2 horses during the interval from 3 to 6 hours. Mucosal radioactivity significantly (P < 0.05) increased at reperfusion in group-3 horses; there was a trend (P = 0.076) toward greater mucosal radioactivity in group-3, compared with group-2 horses, throughout the 3- to 6-hour interval. There were no differences in mucosal myeloperoxidase activity among or within any of the 3 groups over time.

Neutrophils accumulated in the large colon of horses during low-flow ischemia and reperfusion. Neutrophil infiltration was detected by histologic examination and leukocyte scintigraphy, but not by measurement of myeloperoxidase activity. The accumulation of neutrophils during ischemia and the further neutrophil infiltration during reperfusion indicate that neutrophils may contribute to reperfusion injury of the large colon.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research