Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 55 items for

  • Author or Editor: William T. N. Culp x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To describe the clinicopathologic features of a cohort of dogs with adrenocortical masses that underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy and to compare perioperative morbidity and mortality rates in these dogs with rates for dogs that underwent open adrenalectomy for resection of similarly sized (maximal diameter, ≤ 5 cm) adrenocortical masses.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—48 client-owned dogs that underwent laparoscopic (n = 23) or open (25) adrenalectomy for noninvasive tumors (ie, tumors that did not invade the vena cava or other surrounding organs).

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed. History, clinical signs, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic findings, imaging results, and surgical variables were recorded. A 3- or 4-port approach was used for laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Surgical time, perioperative complications, postoperative and overall hospitalization times, and perioperative deaths were recorded and compared between groups.

Results—The surgical method for 1 dog was converted from a laparoscopic to an open approach. Perioperative death occurred in no dogs in the laparoscopic group and 2 dogs in the open adrenalectomy group. Surgical time was shorter for laparoscopic (median, 90 minutes; range, 40 to 150 minutes) than for open (median, 120 minutes; range, 75 to 195 minutes) adrenalectomy. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was associated with shorter hospitalization time and more rapid discharge from the hospital after surgery, compared with the open procedure.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—With careful patient selection, laparoscopic adrenalectomy was associated with a low complication rate and low conversion rate for resection of adrenocortical masses as well as shorter surgical and hospitalization times, compared with open adrenalectomy.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate short-term risk factors associated with dehiscence and death in cats undergoing full-thickness large intestinal incisions.

ANIMALS

84 client-owned cats that had undergone full-thickness large intestinal incisions and for which information regarding outcome through postoperative day 7 was available.

PROCEDURES

Medical records from 4 veterinary teaching hospitals were reviewed. For cats that met the inclusion criteria, signalment, history, laboratory test results, surgical and medical procedures, perioperative complications, and outcome were analyzed. A Fisher exact or Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to identify individual variables associated with dehiscence of intestinal incisions or patient nonsurvival to hospital discharge or both.

RESULTS

84 cats met the inclusion criteria. The overall dehiscence and survival to hospital discharge rates were 8.3% (7/84 cats) and 94% (79/84 cats), respectively. Factors associated with dehiscence and nonsurvival to hospital discharge included presence of band neutrophils, performance of partial colectomy with colonic resection and anastomosis, administration of blood products, postoperative cardiopulmonary arrest, and incisional inflammation or infection. Factors associated with nonsurvival to hospital discharge only included low serum globulin concentration, repair of colonic trauma or dehiscence, and postoperative colonic dehiscence. Factors associated with dehiscence only included hypoalbuminemia, renal dysfunction, administration of blood products or > 2 classes of antimicrobials, and intra-abdominal fecal contamination.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that intestinal dehiscence and mortality rates associated with large intestinal incisions in cats may be higher than previously proposed, although the risk of either outcome was still low. Factors suggestive of systemic illness were associated with colonic dehiscence or death, and focused prospective studies of risk factors are warranted. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2021;259:162–171)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine complication rates for dogs in which full-thickness large intestinal incisions were performed, assess potential risk factors for death during hospitalization and for intestinal dehiscence following these surgeries, and report short-term mortality rates for these patients.

ANIMALS

90 dogs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of 4 veterinary referral hospitals were reviewed to identify dogs that underwent large intestinal surgery requiring full-thickness incisions. Signalment, history, clinicopathologic data, medical treatments, surgical procedures, complications, and outcomes were recorded. Descriptive statistics were calculated; data were analyzed for association with survival to discharge (with logistic regression analysis) and postoperative intestinal dehiscence (with Fisher exact or Wilcoxon rank sum tests).

RESULTS

Overall 7-day postoperative intestinal dehiscence and mortality rates were 9 of 90 (10%) and 15 of 90 (17%). Dogs with preoperative anorexia, hypoglycemia, or neutrophils with toxic changes and those that received preoperative antimicrobial treatment had greater odds of death than did dogs without these findings. Preexisting colon trauma or dehiscence, preexisting peritonitis, administration of blood products, administration of > 2 classes of antimicrobials, positive microbial culture results for a surgical sample, and open abdominal management of peritonitis after surgery were associated with development of intestinal dehiscence. Five of 9 dogs with intestinal dehiscence died or were euthanized.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Factors associated with failure to survive to discharge were considered suggestive of sepsis. Results suggested the dehiscence rate for full-thickness large intestinal incisions may not be as high as previously reported, but several factors may influence this outcome and larger, longer-term studies are needed to confirm these findings.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize the clinical course of dogs with hemoperitoneum in the perioperative setting and to determine risk factors that may affect short-term outcome.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—83 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—The medical records of dogs with hemoperitoneum that underwent surgery between 2005 and 2010 were reviewed. Data were analyzed to determine risk factors associated with perioperative outcome. The perioperative period was defined as the time from admission to the hospital for treatment of hemoperitoneum until the time of discharge or euthanasia (within the same visit).

Results—13 of 83 (16%) dogs died or were euthanized in the perioperative period. The median hospitalization time for surviving dogs was 2 days (range, 1 to 5 days). The requirement for a massive transfusion with blood products was a negative prognostic indicator for hospital discharge. The source of bleeding was isolated to the spleen in 75 of 83 (90%) dogs; a splenic source of hemorrhage was determined to be a positive predictor of survival to discharge from the hospital.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In the present study, factors associated with death and failure to be discharged from the hospital included tachycardia, a requirement for massive transfusion with blood products, and the development of respiratory disease secondary to suspected pulmonary thromboembolism or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The presence of disease within the spleen was positively associated with survival to discharge. Surgical intervention for treatment of hemoperitoneum, regardless of etiology, resulted in discharge from the hospital for 70 of the 83 (84%) dogs in this series.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess risk factors for recurrence of clinical signs associated with thoracolumbar intervertebral disk disease (IVDD) in dogs that had decompressive laminectomy without attempted prophylactic treatment of other disk spaces.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—229 dogs.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs that had decompressive laminectomy without prophylactic fenestration for a first episode of IVDD and were available for follow-up were reviewed. Information on 7 clinical and 8 radiographic potential risk factors were recorded.

Results—Clinical signs associated with recurrence of IVDD developed in 44 (19.2%) dogs. Ninety-six percent of recurrences developed within 3 years after surgery. Recurrence developed in 25% of Dachshunds and 15% of dogs of other breeds combined. Number of opacified disks was a significant risk factor for recurrence. Risk increased with number of opacified disks in an almost linear manner; each opacified disk increased risk by 1.4 times. Dogs with 5 or 6 opacified disks at the time of first surgery had a recurrence rate of 50%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—When all likely episodes of recurrence are considered and a long follow-up period is achieved, true rate of recurrence of IVDD appears to be higher than in many previous reports. Dogs with multiple opacified disks at the time of first surgery should be considered a high-risk subpopulation. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225: 1231–1236)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare 2 screening methods for detecting evidence of hip dysplasia (Orthopedic Foundation for Animals [OFA] and PennHIP) in dogs.

Design—Diagnostic test evaluation study.

Animals—439 dogs ≥ 24 months of age that received routine hip joint screening from June 1987 through July 2008.

Procedures—Dogs were sedated, and PennHIP radiography was performed (hip joint– extended [HE], compression, and distraction radiographic views). The HE radiographic view was submitted for OFA evaluation. A copy of the HE radiographic view plus the compression and distraction radiographic views were submitted for routine PennHIP evaluation, including quantification of hip joint laxity via the distraction index (DI).

Results—14% (60/439) of dogs had hip joints scored as excellent by OFA standards; however, 52% (31/60) of those had a DI ≥ 0.30 (range, 0.14 to 0.61). Eighty-two percent of (183/223) dogs with OFA-rated good hip joints had a DI ≥ 0.30 (range, 0.10 to 0.77), and 94% (79/84) of dogs with OFA-rated fair hip joints had a DI ≥ 0.30 (range, 0.14 to 0.77). Of all dogs with fair to excellent hip joints by OFA standards, 80% (293/367) had a DI ≥ 0.30. All dogs with OFA-rated borderline hip joints or mild, moderate, or severe hip dysplasia had a DI ≥ 0.30 (range, 0.30 to 0.83).

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Dogs judged as phenotypically normal by the OFA harbored clinically important passive hip joint laxity as determined via distraction radiography. Results suggested that OFA scoring of HE radiographs underestimated susceptibility to osteoarthritis in dogs, which may impede progress in reducing or eliminating hip dysplasia through breeding.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe postobstructive diuresis (POD) in cats undergoing surgical placement of ureteral stents or subcutaneous ureteral bypass systems for treatment of ureteral obstruction in cats and to identify factors associated with duration and maximum severity of POD.

DESIGN

Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS

37 client-owned cats with ureteral obstruction treated between August 2010 and December 2014.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed, and data extracted included signalment, history, results from physical examinations and clinical laboratory analyses, treatment, urine output, and outcome. Data were evaluated to identify factors associated with POD duration and maximum severity, alone or in combination.

RESULTS

Serum concentrations of creatinine, potassium, phosphorus, and BUN before surgery positively correlated with duration and maximum severity of POD. Absolute changes in serum concentrations of creatinine, potassium, and BUN from before surgery to after surgery positively correlated with POD duration. Cats with anuria before surgery had longer POD than did other cats; however, there was no difference in POD duration or maximum severity with unilateral versus bilateral ureteral obstruction. Thirty-four of 37 (92%) cats survived to hospital discharge, which was not associated with whether ureteral obstruction was unilateral or bilateral. Azotemia resolved in 17 of the 34 (50%) cats that survived to hospital discharge.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results of the present study indicated that several factors were associated with POD duration and maximum severity, alone or in combination, and that with intensive management of fluid and electrolyte derangements, regardless of the extent of the original azotemia, a high percentage of cats survived to hospital discharge.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the outcome for cats with benign ureteral obstructions treated by means of ureteral stenting and to compare the outcome for these cats with outcome for a historical cohort of cats treated by means of ureterotomy only.

DESIGN Prospective study with historical cohort.

ANIMALS 62 client-owned cats with benign ureteral obstructions, including 26 cats treated with ureteral stenting and 36 cats previously treated with ureterotomy.

PROCEDURES Data were recorded prospectively (ureteral stent cases) or collected retrospectively from the medical records (ureterotomy cases), and results were compared.

RESULTS Cats treated with ureteral stents had significantly greater decreases in BUN and serum creatinine concentrations 1 day after surgery and at hospital discharge, compared with values for cats that underwent ureterotomy. Six cats in the ureteral stent group developed abdominal effusion after surgery, and cats in this group were significantly more likely to develop abdominal effusion when a ureterotomy was performed than when it was not. Cats that developed abdominal effusion after surgery were significantly less likely to survive to hospital discharge. Cats that underwent ureteral stenting were significantly more likely to have resolution of azotemia prior to hospital discharge than were cats that underwent ureterotomy alone.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that cats with benign ureteral obstructions treated with ureteral stenting were more likely to have resolution of azotemia prior to hospital discharge, compared with cats undergoing ureterotomy alone. Results of ureteral stenting were encouraging, but further investigation is warranted.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe and evaluate outcomes of a multidisciplinary, minimally invasive approach combining lacrimoscopy and fluoroscopically guided stenting for management of nasolacrimal apparatus (NLA) obstruction in dogs.

DESIGN Prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial.

ANIMALS 16 client-owned dogs with confirmed NLA obstruction.

PROCEDURES Dogs underwent CT contrast dacryocystorhinography, rhinoscopy, and lacrimoscopy. Whenever possible, the NLA was stented, typically with fluoroscopic guidance.

RESULTS Median duration of clinical signs prior to treatment was 3.2 months (range, 0.2 to 14 months). Causes of NLA obstruction were a foreign body (n = 5), dacryocystitis (4), stenosis secondary to fibrosis (3), granulation tissue (1), or granulation tissue in association with a small foreign body (1); a cause was not identified in 2 dogs. Stents were placed in 14 of 16 (88%) dogs for a median duration of 5.6 weeks (range, 1.3 to 9.4 weeks). Stenting was not possible in 2 dogs with stenosis of the NLA secondary to granulation tissue or fibrosis. Owners of all 16 dogs reported at least 60% clinical improvement with median improvement rated as 95%, and owners of 8 dogs reporting complete resolution of signs. Two dogs required antimicrobial administration because of dacryocystitis that persisted after stent removal; a foreign body was not found in either dog.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Overall clinical response and owner-rated improvement for dogs with NLA obstruction that underwent lacrimoscopy and fluoroscopically guided stenting were high, especially given that these dogs had failed to respond to conventional treatment.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe surgical techniques and perioperative management of dogs with von Willebrand disease (VWD) or factor VII (FVII) deficiency undergoing laparoscopic ovariohysterectomy or ovariectomy and evaluate outcomes.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 20 client-owned dogs with VWD (n = 16) or FVII deficiency (4).

PROCEDURES Dogs with VWD or FVII deficiency that underwent laparoscopic ovariohysterectomy or ovariectomy between 2012 and 2014 were retrospectively identified via a multi-institutional review of medical records.

RESULTS Median expression of von Willebrand factor was 19% (interquartile range, 18% to 30%). All 16 dogs with VWD were Doberman Pinschers, and all were pretreated with desmopressin; 4 also received cryoprecipitate. One of 4 dogs with FVII deficiency received plasma preoperatively, and 1 was treated with desmopressin; 2 dogs received no preoperative treatment. Laparoscopic ovariectomy was performed in 9 dogs with VWD and 2 dogs with FVII deficiency, laparoscopic ovariectomy with gastropexy was performed in 6 dogs with VWD and 1 dog with FVII deficiency, and laparoscopic-assisted ovariohysterectomy was performed in 1 dog with VWD and 1 dog with FVII deficiency. Iatrogenic splenic laceration requiring conversion to laparotomy occurred during trocar insertion in 1 dog with VWD. No postoperative complications, including signs of hemorrhage, were reported for any dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Laparoscopic ovariohysterectomy or ovariectomy in dogs with VWD or FVII deficiency pretreated with desmopressin, cryoprecipitate, or plasma transfusions were not associated with clinical signs of hemorrhage, suggesting that minimally invasive ovariohysterectomy or ovariectomy may be considered in female dogs affected with these coagulopathies.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association