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Abstract

Objective—To characterize the clinical course of dogs with hemoperitoneum in the perioperative setting and to determine risk factors that may affect short-term outcome.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—83 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—The medical records of dogs with hemoperitoneum that underwent surgery between 2005 and 2010 were reviewed. Data were analyzed to determine risk factors associated with perioperative outcome. The perioperative period was defined as the time from admission to the hospital for treatment of hemoperitoneum until the time of discharge or euthanasia (within the same visit).

Results—13 of 83 (16%) dogs died or were euthanized in the perioperative period. The median hospitalization time for surviving dogs was 2 days (range, 1 to 5 days). The requirement for a massive transfusion with blood products was a negative prognostic indicator for hospital discharge. The source of bleeding was isolated to the spleen in 75 of 83 (90%) dogs; a splenic source of hemorrhage was determined to be a positive predictor of survival to discharge from the hospital.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In the present study, factors associated with death and failure to be discharged from the hospital included tachycardia, a requirement for massive transfusion with blood products, and the development of respiratory disease secondary to suspected pulmonary thromboembolism or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The presence of disease within the spleen was positively associated with survival to discharge. Surgical intervention for treatment of hemoperitoneum, regardless of etiology, resulted in discharge from the hospital for 70 of the 83 (84%) dogs in this series.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report perioperative characteristics and outcome following bilateral, single-session, laparoscopic adrenalectomy (BSSLA) in dogs.

ANIMALS

Client-owned dogs (n = 6).

CLINICAL PRESENTATION AND PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed and perioperative data collected, including preoperative diagnostic imaging, operative details, complications, and need for conversion to open laparotomy. Bilateral, single-session, laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed on the right or left side with a standard 3- or 4-portal transperitoneal technique. The dog was repositioned to contralateral recumbency, and laparoscopic adrenalectomy was repeated. Follow-up information was collected by telephone interviews with the owners and/or referring veterinarian.

RESULTS

Median age and weight of dogs were 126 months and 14.75 kg, respectively. Contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) was performed in all dogs. Median maximal tumor diameter was 2.6 and 2.3 cm for the right and left-sided tumors, respectively. Median surgical and anesthesia times were 158 and 240 minutes, respectively. Conversion to open laparotomy was performed in 1 dog following renal vein laceration during initial adrenalectomy. Left adrenalectomy and ureteronephrectomy were performed, and the right adrenal tumor was left in situ. Cardiac arrest occurred in 1 dog following initial adrenalectomy (left); however, the dog was resuscitated successfully, and contralateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed without complication. All dogs survived to hospital discharge. Follow-up ranged from 60 to 730 days (median, 264 days) for dogs that successfully underwent BSSLA.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

BSSLA was associated with favorable outcomes in this cohort of dogs. Laparoscopy may be considered in dogs with bilateral, modestly sized, noninvasive adrenal tumors.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—An 11-year-old castrated male Vizsla was evaluated for excision of a cranial mediastinal mass.

Clinical Findings—The dog had a 1-month history of a cough that had recently increased in frequency. On physical examination, the dog had a grade 2/6 left systolic heart murmur and multiple subcutaneous masses. A soft tissue mass was observed in the cranioventral aspect of the thorax on radiographs. Results of a CT scan revealed a well-defined, 2.8 × 3.2 × 3.9-cm soft tissue mass in the cranial mediastinum.

Treatment and Outcome—The dog underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic removal of the mediastinal mass and recovered routinely. Histologic examination of excised tissues revealed malignant thymoma. Approximately 6.5 months after surgery, the dog was evaluated because of polyuria, polydipsia, decreased appetite, and vomiting. On physical examination, masses were found in both axillary regions. Results of serum biochemical analysis indicated hypercalcemia. Thoracic ultrasonography revealed pulmonary metastases and a large mass in the right caudoventral region of the thorax. The dog received supportive care and medical treatment for hypercalcemia, but clinical signs recurred. Euthanasia was elected; necropsy and histologic examination revealed thymic carcinoma.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Descriptions of the development of portal site metastasis in canine patients are rare. In this patient, portal site metastasis developed rapidly after thoracoscopic resection of a malignant thymic mass and was associated with hypercalcemia. As use of thoracoscopic procedures increases in veterinary medicine, it will be important to monitor the development of major complications such as those in the patient of this report. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2015;247:793–800)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe the operative technique, complications, and conversion rates for laparoscopic liver biopsy (LLB) in dogs and evaluate short-term clinical outcome for dogs that underwent the procedure.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 106 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed to identify dogs that underwent an LLB with a single-port or multiport technique at either of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals from August 2003 to September 2013. Demographic and laboratory data, preoperative administration of fresh frozen plasma, procedural and diagnostic information, intraoperative complications, and survival to discharge were recorded. The LLB specimens were obtained with 5-mm laparoscopic biopsy cup forceps and a grasp-and-twist technique.

RESULTS Prior to surgery, 25 of 94 (27%) dogs had coagulopathy (prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time greater than the facility reference ranges, regardless of platelet count). Twenty-one dogs were thrombocytopenic, 14 had ascites, and 14 received fresh frozen plasma transfusion before surgery. In all cases, biopsy samples collected were of sufficient size and quality for histopathologic evaluation. Two dogs required conversion to an open laparotomy because of splenic laceration during initial port placement. One hundred one of 106 dogs survived to discharge; 5 were euthanized during hospitalization owing to progression of liver disease and poor prognosis.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Single-port and multiport LLB were found to be effective, minimally invasive diagnostic techniques with a low rate of complications. Results suggested LLB can be safely used in dogs with underlying coagulopathies and advanced liver disease.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe the technique and evaluate the outcome of laparoscopic treatment of ovarian remnant syndrome (ORS) in dogs and cats.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—7 client-owned dogs and cats.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs and cats with ORS that were treated laparoscopically at 3 large veterinary teaching hospitals were reviewed. Laparoscopic ovarian remnant resection was performed by means of either a 3-port or single-port technique with the patient in dorsal recumbency. The area caudal to both kidneys was thoroughly inspected for evidence of ovarian tissue by tilting the patient laterally. Any ovarian remnant tissue in these areas was resected with a bipolar vessel sealer.

Results—5 female dogs and 2 female cats that had previously undergone ovariectomy or ovariohysterectomy were included in the study. Six procedures were performed with a standard 3-port technique, and 1 was performed with a single-port technique. Median surgery time was 90 minutes (range, 50 to 150 minutes). No patient required conversion to laparotomy. Six of the 7 patients had complete resolution of clinical signs after surgery. One patient underwent laparotomy 7 weeks after surgery for management of stump pyometra, but no further ovarian tissue was detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Laparoscopic management of ORS in this cohort of dogs and cats was associated with minimal morbidity. Laparoscopic treatment of ORS in dogs and cats may be recommended for appropriately selected patients.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe the operative technique and perioperative outcome for laparoscopic-assisted splenectomy (LAS) in dogs.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 18 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Medical records of dogs with naturally occurring disease of the spleen treated by means of LAS between 2012 and 2014 were reviewed. History, signalment, results of physical examination, results of preoperative diagnostic testing, details of surgical technique, intraoperative findings including results of abdominal exploration and staging, concurrent surgical procedures, complications, histopathologic diagnoses, duration of postoperative hospitalization, and perioperative outcome were recorded. The perioperative period was defined as the time from hospital admission for LAS until discharge or death (within the same visit).

RESULTS All dogs underwent initial abdominal exploration and staging via multiple 5-mm laparoscopic ports (n = 2) or a single commercially available multichannel port (16), followed by minilaparotomy with insertion of a wound retraction device, progressive exteriorization of the spleen, sealing of hilar vessels, and splenectomy. Splenectomy was performed for treatment of a splenic mass (n = 15), suspected neoplasia (2), or refractory immune-mediated disease (1). Median size (width × length) of splenic masses was 5 × 5 cm (range, 1.6 to 11.0 cm × 1.5 to 14.5 cm). Complications were limited to minor intraoperative hemorrhage in 1 dog; no patient required conversion to open laparotomy.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that LAS was technically feasible in dogs and not associated with major complications. Further evaluation is required; however, in appropriately selected patients, LAS may offer the benefits of a minimally invasive technique, including a smaller incision and improved illumination and magnification during exploration and staging.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe complications associated with use of a subcutaneous vascular access port (SVAP) in cats and dogs treated with fractionated radiotherapy and to determine predisposing factors for developing these complications.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—46 cats and 126 dogs.

Procedures—The medical records of cats and dogs undergoing radiation therapy that received placement of an SVAP between March 1996 and August 2007 were reviewed. Data were recorded and analyzed to determine factors for development of complications associated with the use of an SVAP during treatment with fractionated radiotherapy.

Results—18 and 36 major and minor complications were identified, respectively. Sex and the lack of administration of propofol during anesthesia induction were significantly associated with development of major complications. Female cats and dogs were 5.00 times as likely as male cats and dogs to develop major complications associated with SVAP usage. Animals in which propofol was not administered were 19.15 times as likely as animals administered propofol to develop major complications. Placement of SVAP catheters in a femoral vein was 17.20 times as likely as placement in the jugular vein to result in minor complications.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Factors associated with the development of complications included sex, propofol administration, and vein in which an SVAP catheter was inserted. The use of an SVAP may be a useful alternative to repeated catheterizations in cats and dogs.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine prevalence of a radiographic caudolateral curvilinear osteophyte (CCO) on the femoral neck in various breeds and age groups of dogs and to evaluate its contemporaneous relationship with degenerative joint disease (DJD) and distraction index (DI).

Design—Cross-sectional prevalence study.

Animals—25,968 dogs, including 3,729 German Shepherd Dogs, 4,545 Golden Retrievers, 6,277 Labrador Retrievers, and 1,191 Rottweilers.

Procedure—Data from the University of Pennsylvania Hip Improvement Program database were analyzed, including ventrodorsal hip-extended, compression, and distraction radiographs. The CCO and radiographic signs of DJD were considered independent events and were interpreted as either present or absent. Statistical methods were used to evaluate the CCO as a possible risk factor for DJD and assess its association with DI, as measured by use of distraction radiography.

Results—When all breeds were pooled, DJD was detected in 8.6% of dogs, and the CCO was detected in 21.6% of dogs. Among dogs with a CCO, 25.1% had radiographic evidence of DJD. Among dogs without a CCO, only 4% had DJD. Dogs with a CCO were 7.9 times as likely to have DJD as were those without a CCO. Additionally, DI, weight, and age were significant risk factors for the CCO.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results confirm the contemporaneous association between the CCO and DJD and that passive hip laxity, as measured by use of the DI, is associated with both the CCO and DJD. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:472–476)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) on morphology and compliance of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) by use of impedance planimetry in healthy dogs and to quantify the effect of changes in IAP.

ANIMALS 7 healthy, purpose-bred sexually intact male hound-cross dogs.

PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized, and cross-sectional area (CSA), minimal diameter (MD), LES length, LES volume, and distensibility index (DI) of the LES were evaluated by use of an endoscopic functional luminal imaging probe. For each dog, measurements were obtained before (baseline) and after creation of a pneumoperitoneum at an IAP of 4, 8, and 15 mm Hg. Order of the IAPs was determined by use of a randomization software program.

RESULTS CSA and MD at 4 and 8 mm Hg were not significantly different from baseline measurements; however, CSA and MD at 15 mm Hg were both significantly greater than baseline measurements. The LES length and LES volume did not differ significantly from baseline measurements at any IAP. The DI differed inconsistently from the baseline measurement but was not substantially affected by IAP.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Pneumoperitoneum created with an IAP of 4 or 8 mm Hg did not significantly alter LES morphology in healthy dogs. Pneumoperitoneum at an IAP of 15 mm Hg caused a significant increase in CSA and MD of the LES. Compliance of the LES as measured by the DI was not greatly altered by pneumoperitoneum at an IAP of up to 15 mm Hg.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether age, breed, sex, weight, or distraction index (DI) was associated with the risk that dogs of 4 common breeds (German Shepherd Dog, Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever, Rottweiler) would have radiographic evidence of degenerative joint disease (DJD) associated with hip dysplasia.

Design—Cross-sectional prevalence study.

Animals—15,742 dogs.

Procedure—Hips of dogs were evaluated radiographically by use of the ventrodorsal hip-extended view, the compression view, and the distraction view. The ventrodorsal hip-extended view was examined to determine whether dogs had DJD. For each breed, a multiple logistic regression model incorporating age, sex, weight, and DI was created. For each breed, disease-susceptibility curves were produced, using all dogs, regardless of age, and dogs grouped on the basis of age.

Results—Weight and DI were significant risk factors for DJD in all breeds. For German Shepherd Dogs, the risk of having DJD was 4.95 times the risk for dogs of the other 3 breeds combined. In all breeds, the probability of having DJD increased with age.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that the probability of having hip DJD increased with hip joint laxity as measured by use of DI. This association was breed-specific, indicating that breedspecific information on disease susceptibility should be incorporated when making breeding decisions and when deciding on possible surgical treatment of hip dysplasia. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1719–1724)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association