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Abstract

Objective—To compare fit and geometry of reconstruction of femoral components of 4 canine cemented total hip replacement implants and determine which implants are most compatible with current principles of cemented arthroplasty.

Sample Population—Paired femurs from 16 adult mixed-breed dogs.

Procedure—Femurs were prepared for femoral stem implantation of either the Bardet, BioMedtrix, Mathys, or Richards II implant. Mediolateral and craniocaudal radiographs were obtained with femoral components in situ. Cross-sectional analysis of implant fit was performed on transected cemented specimens. Computer-aided analyses of digitized images were performed.

Results—The Bardet and Richards II implants reconstructed the original femoral head position significantly better than the other 2 implants. None of the implants allowed neutralization of the implant axis in the sagittal plane or were routinely centralized in the femoral canal. The Bardet implant had the smallest minimum distal tip offset in the sagittal plane. Greatest tip to cortex distance was provided by the Richards II implant in the transverse plane and the Mathys implant in the sagittal plane. The thinnest cement mantle regions for all implants were in the central longitudinal third of the femoral stem.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The Bardet and BioMedtrix implants had stem design characteristics that were most compatible with principles of cemented stem fixation. None of the implants completely satisfied the theoretically optimal conditions of centralization and neutralization of the femoral stem. Innovative design modifications, therefore, may be needed if these conditions are important to the longterm success of canine total hip replacement. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1113–1121)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine elemental composition of teeth with and without odontoclastic resorption lesions (ORL) in cats.

Sample Population—Normal teeth from 22 cadaver cats and ORL-affected teeth from 21 cats admitted to the veterinary hospital for dental treatment.

Procedure—An electron microprobe was used to analyze weight percentages of calcium, phosphorus, fluorine, sodium, magnesium, sulfur, potassium, and iron in enamel, dentin, and cementum.

Results—Calcium and phosphorus were the most abundant elements. Fluorine, sodium, and magnesium combined were < 5% and sulfur, potassium, and iron combined were < 0.1% of total elemental composition. In enamel of normal teeth, a significant sex-by-jaw location interaction was seen in mean (± SD) phosphorus content, which was higher in mandibular teeth of females (17.64 ± 0.41%) but lower in mandibular teeth of males (16.71 ± 0.83%). Mean iron content in dentin of normal teeth was significantly lower in mandibular teeth than maxillary teeth (0.014 ± 0.005% vs 0.023 ± 0.019%). Mean enamel sodium content was significantly higher (0.77 ± 0.046% vs 0.74 ± 0.025) and mean enamel iron content was significantly lower (0.017 ± 0.008% vs 0.021 ± 0.005%) in ORL-affected teeth, compared with normal teeth. In cementum, mean fluorine content was significantly lower (2.98% ± 0.27 vs 2.99 ± 0.20%) and mean magnesium content was significantly lower (0.54 ± 0.13% vs 0.60 ± 0.13%) in ORLaffected teeth, compared with normal teeth.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of our study establish baseline mineral content of enamel, dentin, and cementum for normal teeth in cats. Minimal differences in mineral content of enamel and cementum of normal and ORL-affected teeth were detected. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:546–550)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of pneumoperitoneum on cardiorespiratory variables and working space during experimental induction of 3 intra-abdominal pressures (IAPs) in cats.

Animals—6 healthy young adult neutered male domestic shorthair cats.

Procedures—All cats were anesthetized through use of a standardized protocol. A catheter was placed in the right femoral artery for blood pressure and blood gas monitoring. A thermodilution catheter was placed in the right jugular vein via fluoroscopic guidance. Cardiopulmonary variables were measured before (baseline) and 2 and 30 minutes after initiation of pneumoperitoneum at IAPs of 4, 8, and 15 mm Hg; these were created through the use of a mechanical insufflator. At each IAP, abdominal dimensions (height, width, and circumference) were measured at a standardized location.

Results—At 4 mm Hg and 8 mm Hg IAP, no clinically important changes were identified in cardiorespiratory values. Heart rate, cardiac index, and stroke volume index remained unchanged throughout the study at all IAPs. Mean arterial blood pressure began to increase at 8 mm Hg and was significantly higher, compared with baseline, at both time points at 15 mm Hg. At 15 mm Hg, Paco2 was significantly higher and cats were more acidotic than at baseline. Working space was subjectively greater at 8 mm Hg than at 4 mm Hg IAP; however, at 15 mm Hg, no clinically important enlargement of the working space was identified, compared with at 8 mm Hg.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Values of cardiopulmonary variables were largely unchanged by induction of pneumoperitoneum in healthy cats up to an IAP of 8 mm Hg, and no clinically important increases in working space were evident at an IAP of 15 versus 8 mm Hg. These findings provide little justification for use of IAPs > 8 mm Hg in healthy cats undergoing laparoscopic procedures; however, whether the situation is similar in diseased or elderly cats remains to be determined.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To establish comprehensive reference ranges for plasma amino acid and whole blood taurine concentrations in healthy adult cats eating commercial diets and to evaluate the relationships of age, sex, body weight, body condition score (BCS), dietary protein concentration, and dietary ingredients with plasma amino acid and whole blood taurine concentrations.

Animals—120 healthy adult cats.

Procedures—Blood samples and a complete health and diet history were obtained for each cat, and reference intervals for plasma amino acid and whole blood taurine concentrations were determined. Results were analyzed for associations of age, breed, sex, body weight, BCS, use of heparin, sample hemolysis and lipemia, dietary protein concentrations, and dietary ingredients with amino acid concentrations.

Results—95% reference intervals were determined for plasma amino acid and whole blood taurine concentrations. A significant difference in amino acid concentrations on the basis of sex was apparent for multiple amino acids. There was no clear relationship between age, BCS, body weight, and dietary protein concentration and amino acid concentrations. Differences in amino acid concentrations were detected for various dietary ingredients, but the relationships were difficult to interpret.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—This study provided data on plasma amino acid and whole blood taurine concentrations for a large population of adult cats eating commercial diets. Plasma amino acid and whole blood taurine concentrations were not affected by age, BCS, or body weight but were affected by sex and neuter status. Dietary protein concentration and dietary ingredients were not directly associated with plasma amino acid or whole blood taurine concentrations.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the diagnostic value of 2 intraoral bisecting angle radiographic views in comparison with periodontal probing for the assessment of periodontal attachment of the canine teeth in dogs.

Study Population—466 canine teeth from 117 dogs.

Procedure—Periodontal probing measurements were recorded, and clinical attachment levels (CAL) were calculated at the mesial, buccal, distal, and lingual (or palatal) surfaces on each canine tooth. Occlusal and lateral radiographs of the canine teeth were obtained. Alveolar margin height (AMH) was measured at the same 4 surfaces. Values for AMH and CAL were compared on the basis of tooth surface, dental arch, and radiographic view.

Results—The AMH at the mesial and distal surfaces of the mandibular canine teeth was measurable on the lateral view and was significantly correlated with CAL. Similar results were found for the mesial and distal surfaces of the maxillary canine teeth. Buccal and lingual AMH were measured on the mandibular occlusal radiographic view, and values were significantly correlated with CAL, but only the buccal AMH could be assessed on the occlusal radiographic view of the maxilla with values that correlated significantly with CAL.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The lateral radiographic view is suitable for evaluating periodontal attachment at the mesial and distal surfaces of the canine teeth in dogs. The occlusal radiographic view is suitable for assessing buccal surfaces as well as the lingual surface of mandibular canine teeth but not the palatal surface of maxillary canine teeth in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:255–261)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare sensitivity and specificity of cytologic examination and 3 chromogen tests for detection of occult blood in cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus) excrement.

Animals—20 adult cockatiels.

Procedures—Pooled blood from birds was divided into whole blood and lysate aliquots. Excrement was mixed with each aliquot in vitro to yield 6 hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations (range, 0.375 to 12.0 mg of Hb/g of excrement). For the in vivo portion of the study, birds were serially gavaged with each aliquot separately at 5 doses of Hb (range, 2.5 to 40 mg/kg). Three chromogen tests and cytologic examination were used to test excrement samples for occult blood. Sensitivity, specificity, and observer agreement were calculated.

Results—In vitro specificity ranged from 85%to 100% for the 3 chromogen tests and was 100% for cytologic examination. Sensitivity was 0% to 35% for cytologic examination and 100% for the 3 chromogen tests on samples containing ≥ 1.5 mg of Hb/g of excrement. In vivo specificity was 100%, 90%, 65%, and 45% for cytologic examination and the 3 chromogen tests, respectively. Sensitivity was 0% to 5% for cytologic examination and ≥ 75% for all 3 chromogen tests after birds received doses of Hb ≥ 20 mg/kg. Observer agreement was lowest for cytologic examination.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Chromogen tests were more useful than cytologic examination for detection of occult blood in cockatiel excrement. The best combination of sensitivity, specificity, and observer agreement was obtained by use of a chromogen test.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of stress in cats with feline idiopathic cystitis (FIC) by evaluating bladder permeability, sympathetic nervous system function, and urine cortisol:creatinine (C:Cr) ratios during periods of stress and after environmental enrichment.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—13 cats with FIC and 12 healthy cats.

Procedure—Cats subjected to an acute-onset moderate stressor for 8 days received IV injections of fluorescein. Serum fluorescein concentrations were determined and compared with those of controls to evaluate bladder permeability, and urine C:Cr ratios were compared to evaluate function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Plasma catecholamine concentrations were analyzed in a subset of cats. After 8 days of moderate stress, cats were moved to an enriched environment, and tests were repeated after 21 days.

Results—Serum fluorescein concentrations were significantly higher in cats with FIC at all time points. In the cats in which plasma catecholamine concentrations were determined, concentrations of dihydroxyphenylalanine, norepinephrine, and dihyroxyphenylglycol were significantly higher in cats with FIC at all time points, whereas no differences in urine C:Cr ratio between groups were observed.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Cats with FIC appeared to have altered bladder permeability, most notably during the period of initial stress. The increase in plasma dihydroxyphenylalanine concentration suggests that there may be stress-induced increase in the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in catecholamine synthesis. In contrast, no effects of stress on C:Cr ratios were observed, which suggests there was dissociation between the sympathetic nervous system and HPA-axis responses to stress.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate results of root canal treatment in dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Sample Population—127 tooth roots in 64 dogs.

Procedure—Radiographs obtained before surgery, immediately after surgery, and during follow-up examinations after surgery were evaluated by 2 individuals. Treatment was considered successful if the periodontal ligament space was normal and possible preoperative root resorption, if present, had ceased. Treatment was considered to show no evidence of failure if possible preoperative root resorption had ceased but a preexisting periapical lesion had remained the same or only decreased in size and not complete resolved. Treatment was considered to have failed if a periapical lesion or root resorption developed subsequent to endodontic treatment, if a preexisting periapical lesion had increased in size, or if possible preoperative root resorption appeared to continue after endodontic treatment.

Results—Follow-up time ranged from 1 to 60 months (mean, 13 months). Treatment was classified as successful for 87 (69%) roots, as showing no evidence of failure for 33 (26%) roots, and as having failed for 7 (6%) roots. The success rate was lower for canine teeth than for maxillary fourth premolar teeth. Roots with a preexisting periapical lucency or preexisting root resorption had lower success rates. The use of intracanal medication and the method and quality of obturation were not associated with outcome.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that root canal treatment offers a viable option for salvage of periodontally sound but endodontically diseased teeth in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:775–780)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) concentration measurement after administration of ACTH for use in the diagnosis of hyperadrenocorticism in dogs.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—110 dogs.

Procedure—Serum 17-OHP concentrations were measured before and after ACTH stimulation in 53 healthy dogs to establish reference values for this study. Affected dogs had pituitary-dependent (n = 40) or adrenal tumor–associated (12) hyperadrenocorticism or potentially had atypical hyperadrenocorticism (5; diagnosis confirmed in 1 dog). In affected dogs, frequency interval and borderline and abnormal serum 17-OHP concentrations after ACTH stimulation were determined. Serum cortisol concentrations were assessed via low-dose dexamethasone suppression and ACTH stimulation tests.

Results—In healthy dogs, serum 17-OHP concentration frequency intervals were grouped by sex and reproductive status (defined as < 95th percentile). Frequency intervals of serum 17-OHP concentrations after ACTH stimulation were < 7.7, < 2.0, < 3.2, and < 3.4 ng/mL (< 23.3, < 6.1, < 9.7, and < 10.3 nmol/L) for sexually intact and neutered females and sexually intact and neutered males, respectively. In 53 dogs with confirmed hyperadrenocorticism, serum cortisol concentrations after ACTH stimulation and 8 hours after administration of dexamethasone and serum 17- OHP concentrations after ACTH stimulation were considered borderline or abnormal in 79%, 93%, and 69% of dogs, respectively. Two of 5 dogs considered to have atypical hyperadrenocorticism had abnormal serum 17-OHP concentrations after ACTH stimulation.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Serum 17-OHP concentration measurement after ACTH stimulation may be useful in the diagnosis of hyperadrenocorticism in dogs when other test results are equivocal. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:1095–1101)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine usefulness of the test for proteins induced by vitamin K absence or antagonism (PIVKA) to identify anticoagulant-poisoned dogs, compared with one-stage prothrombin time (OSPT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) tests.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—325 dogs.

Procedure—Comparisons of results of PIVKA, OSPT, and APTT measurements in dogs with anticoagulant poisoning, hepatic disease, disseminated intravascular coagulation, other blood-related disorders, immune-mediated diseases, or other chronic and acute diseases were performed. Median, quartile, and range values were determined.

Results—PIVKA tests with a 150-second critical value had > 98% specificity and > 90% sensitivity for diagnosis of anticoagulant poisoning versus > 99% specificity and > 79% sensitivity with a 300-second critical value. Comparison of PIVKA values among diagnostic groups revealed significant differences between dogs with anticoagulant poisoning and all other groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The PIVKA test with a 150-second critical value is diagnostically useful for distinguishing anticoagulant poisoning from other coagulopathies. Severe liver disease can cause false-positive results. Administration of vitamin K1 or early evaluation (within a few hours of ingesting anticoagulant) may cause false-negative results. Dogs with PIVKA test values > 150 seconds and clinical signs of anticoagulant poisoning can confidently be considered to have anticoagulant poisoning because of the high test sensitivity and specificity. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:194–198)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association