Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 55 items for

  • Author or Editor: Eric Monnet x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate thoracoscopy as a treatment for dogs with persistent right aortic arch (PRAA) and to compare intra- and postoperative complications and short-term outcomes of dogs that underwent thoracoscopy versus thoracotomy for treatment of PRAA.

DESIGN Retrospective cohort study.

ANIMALS 30 dogs (24 client-owned and 6 shelter-owned) that had undergone thoracoscopy or thoracotomy for treatment of PPRA between 1998 and 2015.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed retrospectively, and data were compared between dogs that underwent thoracoscopy versus thoracotomy. For dogs that underwent thoracoscopy, linear regression was performed to compare duration of surgery with sequential order of thoracoscopies.

RESULTS Dogs underwent a thoracotomy alone (n = 15), thoracoscopy alone (10), or thoracoscopy converted to thoracotomy (5) for treatment of PRAA. Median duration of surgery was not markedly different among groups, nor was the incidence of postoperative complications or median amount of time a thoracostomy tube was maintained in place. Median duration of hospitalization was 1 day (range, 0.5 to 2 days) for dogs that underwent thoracoscopy and 2 days (range, 0.5 to 22 days) for dogs that underwent thoracotomy or in which thoracoscopy was converted to a thoracotomy.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Thoracoscopy was found to be an acceptable method for treating dogs with PRAA and was not associated with higher morbidity or mortality rates, compared with thoracotomy.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess rates of intraoperative complications and conversion to laparotomy associated with supervised veterinary students performing laparoscopic ovariectomy in dogs.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 161 female shelter dogs for which elective laparoscopic ovariectomy had been performed by supervised senior (fourth-year) veterinary students from 2010 through 2014.

PROCEDURES Medical records of all dogs were reviewed and data collected regarding duration of surgery, surgical complications and other characteristics, and whether conversion to laparotomy was required.

RESULTS Laparoscopic ovariectomy was performed with a 2-cannula technique and a 10-mm vessel-sealing device for hemostasis in all dogs. A Veress needle was used for initial insufflation in 144 (89.4%) dogs; method of insufflation was not reported for the remaining 17 (10.6%) dogs. Mean ± SD duration of surgery was 114.90 ± 33.40 minutes. Surgical complications, all classified as minor blood loss, occurred in 24 (14.9%) dogs. These included splenic puncture during insertion of the Veress needle (n = 20 [12.4%]) and minor bleeding from the ovarian pedicle (4 [2.5%]). Splenic puncture required no intervention, and ovarian pedicle bleeding required application of the vessel-sealing device an additional time to control the bleeding. Two ovaries were dropped in the abdominal cavity at the time of removal. Both were retrieved without complication. Conversion to laparotomy was not required for any dog. All dogs were discharged from the hospital within 24 hours after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Laparoscopic ovariectomy in dogs was performed safely by closely supervised novice surgeons, with only minor intraoperative complications encountered and no need for conversion to laparotomy.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of infiltration of the incision site with bupivacaine hydrochloride as part of a multimodal analgesia protocol (incisional block) on postoperative analgesia and incisional healing.

Design—Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—92 shelter-owned female dogs undergoing routine ovariohysterectomy.

Procedures—As part of a multimodal analgesic protocol for ovariohysterectomy, dogs received 1 of the following treatments at the incision site: no injection (26 dogs), preincisional infiltration with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (12 dogs) or bupivacaine (21 dogs), or postincisional infiltration with bupivacaine (33 dogs). Postoperative pain was assessed with the Glasgow pain scale and response to mechanical stimulation with von Frey filaments. Incisions were monitored for signs of inflammation (edema, erythema, and discharge) and complications in wound healing.

Results—There was no difference in pain scores or response to mechanical stimulation over time among treatments. There were no significant differences in incisional edema or discharge among treatments. There was significantly more erythema in dogs that received preincisional infiltration with saline solution at 4 hours after surgery and less erythema in dogs that received postincisional infiltration with bupivacaine at 24 hours after surgery, compared with other treatments. The number of complications for dogs that had preincisional infiltration of bupivacaine was higher than for dogs that had other treatments; complications included excessive inflammation, splenic laceration, and herniation.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—No additional analgesic benefit was found in dogs that underwent local bupivacaine infiltration as part of a multimodal analgesic protocol for ovariohysterectomy.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether preoperative serum ionized calcium (iCa) or parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations help predict postoperative hypocalcemia following parathyroidectomy in dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—17 dogs with primary hyperparathyroidism treated with parathyroidectomy.

Procedures—Medical records were evaluated from years 2001 to 2009. Data evaluated included age, breed, sex, clinical signs, diagnostic tests performed, preoperative and postoperative iCa concentrations, preoperative PTH concentrations, and whether calcium supplementation was provided following surgery. Two groups were identified on the basis of whether dogs became hypocalcemic (iCa < 1.2 mmol/L) following parathyroidectomy.

Results—12 dogs developed hypocalcemia after surgery. Preoperative (within 24 hours before surgery) iCa concentrations for the hypocalcemic group (mean ± SD, 1.82 ± 0.22 mmol/L) and the nonhypocalcemic group (1.83 ± 0.29 mmol/L) were not significantly different. Calcium concentrations decreased in a linear fashion during the 24 hours following parathyroidectomy, and the slopes of the decrease over that time were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Preoperative PTH concentrations were not significantly different between the hypocalcemic and nonhypocalcemic groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Preoperative iCa and PTH concentrations were not predictive of postoperative hypocalcemia in dogs undergoing parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism. Future studies to evaluate whether calcium supplementation should be provided on an individual basis with perhaps more emphasis on clinical signs than iCa concentrations after surgery may be warranted.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of urinary bladder retroflexion (UBR) and surgical technique on postoperative complication rates and long-term outcome in dogs with perineal hernia.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—41 client-owned dogs with perineal hernia that underwent surgery between November 2002 and November 2009.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for information on dog signalment, history, physical examination findings, ultrasonographic findings, surgical techniques, intraoperative complications, duration of hospital stay, postoperative complications, and long-term outcome.

Results—31 dogs had no UBR, and 10 dogs had UBR. Internal obturator muscle transposition (IOMT) was performed in 20 dogs, and a cystopexy or colopexy was performed before the IOMT (LapIOMT) in 21. Postoperative complications included tenesmus (n = 8) and urinary incontinence (1). Rates of postoperative complications were not significantly different between the no-UBR and UBR groups or between the IOMT and LapIOMT groups. Thirty-two dogs were free of clinical signs at the time of the study. The median disease-free interval did not differ significantly between dogs in the no-UBR and UBR groups, but it was significantly lower in the LapIOMT group than in the IOMT group. None of the 7 dogs with UBR that were treated without cystopexy developed recurrence of UBR.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—UBR was not associated with an increased rate of postoperative complications relative to no UBR and had no effect on the long-term outcome in dogs with perineal hernia. The use of IOMT alone may be recommended for clinical use because LapIOMT offered no clear advantage.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether subtotal pericardectomy affects recurrence and long-term outcomes in dogs with idiopathic chylothorax (IC).

ANIMALS

12 client-owned dogs diagnosed with IC between July 26, 2016, and March 23, 2023.

METHODS

The diagnosis of constrictive physiology (CP) was established with cardiac catheterization and defined as elevated and equal diastolic pressures in all 4 cardiac chambers. Dogs were then entered into the constrictive physiology (CP) group or non-CP (NCP) group. All dogs received at least a thoracic duct ligation (TDL). The dogs in the CP group had a subtotal pericardectomy performed in addition to TDL. Repeated surgical interventions, recurrence, long-term outcomes, and survival times were recorded.

RESULTS

8 dogs were entered into the CP group and underwent TDL and subtotal pericardectomy. Four dogs were entered in the NCP group and underwent only a TDL. Four dogs in the CP group and 1 in the NCP group required multiple surgeries for recurrent chylothorax. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year disease-free rates were, respectively, 100%, 100%, and 50% for the NCP group and 87.5%, 72.9%, and 72.9% for the CP group (P = .935). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were, respectively, 100%, 100%, and 100% for the NCP group and 87.5%, 72.9%, and 72.9% for the CP group (P = .317).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Constrictive physiology should be evaluated by cardiac catheterization before surgical treatment of IC in dogs. If CP is not diagnosed, subtotal pericardectomy may not be required.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the feasibility of thoracoscopic resection of masses located on the right auricle in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—Dogs (n = 9) with a mass on the right auricle.

Procedures—Hospital records from 2003 to 2011 were reviewed. Only dogs that underwent thoracoscopic resection of a mass on the right auricle were selected. Data collected included history, clinicopathologic findings, surgical technique, and outcome.

Results—All dogs with pericardial effusion were examined by means of echocardiography. Cardiac masses on the right auricle were identified in 5 dogs. Eight dogs had clinical signs of cardiac tamponade and right-sided heart failure. All dogs underwent thoracoscopic resection of a mass on the right atrium. Eight hemangiosarcomas and 1 pyogranulomatous lesion were resected. One dog with a mass located at the base of the right auricle died during surgery. No postoperative complications were noted.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Right auricular masses were successfully removed in 8 dogs. Masses close to the base of the right atrial appendage may not be amenable to resection with thoracoscopy. Resection of small masses at the tip of the right auricular appendage can be performed thoracoscopically.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of intraoperative attenuation of congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts (CEPSSs) during cellophane banding procedures in dogs.

Study Design—Retrospective case series and prospective study.

Animals—18 cases evaluated retrospectively and 14 dogs evaluated prospectively.

Procedures—Gradual occlusion of CEPSSs was performed via cellophane banding. Shunts were occluded to a diameter < 3.0 mm during surgery in dogs prospectively enrolled in the partial attenuation group, whereas the shunt was not attenuated during surgery in dogs prospectively enrolled in the no-attenuation group or in dogs that had previously undergone surgery and were retrospectively evaluated. Postprandial serum bile acids (PPSBA) concentrations were measured before surgery and at various time points after surgery.

Results—Mean ± SD PPSBA concentrations were 26.8 ± 24.5 μmol/L at < 2.25 months after surgery (n = 16 dogs), 22.1 ± 14.0 μmol/L from 2.25 to 6 months after surgery (12 dogs), and 34.9 ± 32.5 μmol/L at > 6 months after surgery (22 dogs). In the prospectively enrolled dogs, mean PPSBA concentrations increased over time in dogs in the partial attenuation group, but not in dogs in the no-attenuation group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cellophane banding may be used to occlude larger CEPSSs and may decrease the need for intraoperative monitoring of portal vein blood pressure. The technique may facilitate minimally invasive treatment of CEPSSs in dogs. Intraoperative attenuation of CEPSSs to a diameter < 3.0 mm is not necessary and may result in a less favorable outcome.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of sevoflurane on cardiac energetic and hemodynamic parameters in ferrets.

Animals—7 healthy domesticated ferrets.

Procedure—Sevoflurane was used as the sole anesthetic agent for general anesthesia in ferrets. Standard midline laparotomy and median sternotomy were performed to permit instrumentation. Myocardial blood flow was determined by use of colored microsphere technology. Measurements and blood samples were obtained at 1.25%, 2.5%, and 3.75% expired concentration of sevoflurane.

Results—A dose-dependent decrease in arterial blood pressure, left ventricular pressure, systemic vascular resistance, aortic flow, and dp/dt (an index of contractility) was detected as expired concentration of sevoflurane increased. Heart rate, central venous pressure, coronary vascular resistance, myocardial oxygen extraction ratio, and (the time constant of relaxation) were unchanged. Cardiac external work decreased, as did myocardial oxygen consumption, causing increased cardiac efficiency at higher concentrations of sevoflurane.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Sevoflurane caused minimal and predictable cardiovascular effects in ferrets without increasing myocardial metabolic demands. Data obtained from this study have not been previously reported for a species that is being commonly used in cardiovascular research. These findings also support use of sevoflurane as a safe inhalant anesthetic in ferrets for clinical and research settings. ( Am J Vet Res 2004:65:653–658)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research