Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 58 items for

  • Author or Editor: C. Wayne McIlwraith x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

SUMMARY

Periosteal autografts were used for repair of large osteochondral defects in 10 horses aged 2 to 3 years old. In each horse, osteochondral defects measuring 1.0 × 1.0 cm2 were induced bilaterally on the distal articular surface of each radial carpal bone. Control and experimental defects were drilled. Periosteum was harvested from the proximal portion of the tibia and was glued into the principal defects, using a fibrin adhesive. Control defects were glued, but were not grafted.

Sixteen weeks after the grafting procedure, the quality of the repair tissue of control and grafted defects was assessed biochemically. Total collagen content and the proportion of type-II collagen were determined. Galactosamine and glucosamine contents also were determined. From these measurements, contents of chondroitin and keratan sulfate and total glycosaminoglycan, and galactosamine-to-glucosamine ratio were calculated. All biochemical variables were compared with those of normal equine articular cartilage taken from the same site in another group of clinically normal horses. Total collagen content was determined on the basis of 4-hydroxyproline content, using a colorimetric method. The proportions of collagen types I and II in the repair tissue were assessed by electrophoresis of their cyanogen bromide-cleaved peptides on sodium dodecyl sulfate slab gels. Peptide ratios were computed and compared with those of standard mixtures of type-I and type-II collagens. Galactosamine and glucosamine contents were determined by use of ion chromatography.

In general, the biochemical composition of repair tissue of grafted and nongrafted defects was similar, but clearly differed from that of normal articular cartilage. Total glycosaminoglycan content, galactosamine and glucosamine contents, and galactosamine-to-glucosamine ratio of grafted and nongrafted defects were all significantly (P < 0.05) less than corresponding values in normal equine articular cartilage. By contrast, total collagen content of neocartilaginous tissues of grafted and nongrafted defects was greater than that of normal articular cartilage, although the difference was not significant. The proportion of type-I and type-II collagens in repair tissue in grafted and nongrafted defects was 70 and 30%, respectively. The fibrous nature of the repair tissue reported in a companion morphologic and histochemical study was substantiated by the biochemical results. We concluded that use of periosteal autografts did not improve the healing of osteochondral defects.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the influence of early conditioning exercise on the development of gross cartilage defects and swelling behavior of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) in the midcarpal joint of horses.

Animals—12 Thoroughbreds.

Procedures—6 horses underwent early conditioning exercise from birth to 18 months of age (CONDEX group), and 6 horses were used as control animals (PASTEX group). The horses were euthanized at 18 months of age, and the midcarpal joints were harvested. Gross defects of the cartilage surface were classified and mapped. Opposing surfaces of the third and radial carpal bones were used to quantify swelling behavior of the cartilage ECM.

Results—A wide range of gross defects was detected in the cartilage on the opposing surfaces of the bones of the midcarpal joint; however, there was no significant difference between the CONDEX and PASTEX groups. Similarly, no significant difference in swelling behavior of the cartilage ECM was evident between the CONDEX and PASTEX groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In the study reported here, we did not detect negative influences of early conditioning exercise on the prevalence of gross defects in cartilage of the midcarpal joint or the quality of the cartilage ECM as defined by swelling behavior. These results suggested that early conditioning exercise may be used without negative consequences for the midcarpal joint and the cartilage ECM of the third and radial carpal bones.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To describe and measure histologic features of midcarpal joint cartilage defects in Thoroughbreds and evaluate the influence of early conditioning exercise on defect development.

Sample—24 midcarpal joints from twelve 18-month-old Thoroughbreds.

Procedures—Midcarpal joints from 12 horses (6 exercised spontaneously at pasture only and 6 given additional conditioning exercise beginning at a mean age of 3 weeks were evaluated. Gross cartilage defects were assessed histologically. Third and radial carpal bones were categorized with regard to the presence or absence of calcified cartilage (CC) abnormalities at the dorsoproximal and dorsodistal articular surfaces, respectively; histomorphometric assessment and statistical analysis were conducted for the third carpal bone.

Results—Number and severity of defects did not appear different between exercise groups. Nine third or radial carpal bones had thickened CC with microcracks, matrix and osteochondral junction changes, and increased vascularity, without histologic changes in the hyaline cartilage. Third carpal bones with CC abnormalities had significantly thicker CC (452 vs 228 μm) than did those without CC abnormalities in the evaluated region. However, in the same region, there were no significant differences in hyaline cartilage thickness (681 vs 603 μm), vascular channel area in the subchondral bone (624,894 vs 490,320 μm2), or number of vascular channels (15.9 vs 18.0).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Early exercise did not appear to influence the distribution or severity of cartilage defects in the midcarpal joint. Calcified cartilage abnormalities beneath the undisrupted hyaline cartilage in the dorsoproximal aspect of the third carpal bone may represent the first changes in the pathogenesis of midcarpal osteochondral disease.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate histomorphometric changes in the cartilage and subchondral bone of the third carpal bone associated with conditioning exercise in young Thoroughbreds.

Animals—Nine 18-month-old Thoroughbreds.

Procedures—Both third carpal bones of 9 horses (4 exercised spontaneously at pasture only and 5 given additional conditioning exercise beginning at a mean age of 3 weeks) were evaluated. Histomorphometric variables (hyaline and calcified cartilage thickness and collagen orientation; vascular channel area, number, and orientation; and osteochondral junction rugosity) of the third carpal bone, sampled at 4 dorsopalmar sites in the radial facet, were compared between the exercised and nonexercised groups.

Results—The vascular channel area measured at the 4 dorsopalmar sites was larger in the exercised group than in the control group, but none of the variables were significantly different between groups. Both groups had significant site-specific variations in all measured variables. Most importantly, the vascular channel area was highest in the most dorsal aspect.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that the mild exercise imposed in both groups during the developmental period appeared to be associated with an increase in the vascular channel area beneath the calcified cartilage layer in the third carpal bone. This increased vascular channel area could also be associated with high stress in the dorsal aspect of the radial facet, a region that is known to be vulnerable to osteochondral fragmentation.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

The effects of the corticosteroid 6-α-methylprednisolone acetate on normal equine articular cartilage were evaluated, using the middle carpal joint in 4 clinically normal young horses. One middle carpal joint of each horse was injected 3 times with 100 mg of 6-α-methylprednisolone acetate, at 14-day intervals. The opposite middle carpal joint (control) was injected with 2.5 ml of lactated Ringer solution at the same intervals. Effects were studied until 8 weeks after the first injection. Evaluation included clinical and radiographic examination, and gross, microscopic, and biochemical evaluation of joint tissues.

Horses remained clinically normal during the study, and significant radiographic changes were not observed. Safranin-0 matrix staining intensity and uronic acid content were significantly (P < 0.05) lower and hydroxyproline content was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in articular cartilage of corticosteroid-injected joints vs control joints.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To develop an antibody that specifically recognizes collagenase-cleaved type-II collagen in equine articular cartilage.

Sample Population—Cartilage specimens from horses euthanatized for problems unrelated to the musculoskeletal system.

Procedure—A peptide was synthesized representing the carboxy- (C-) terminus (neoepitope) of the equine type-II collagen fragment created by mammalian collagenases. This peptide was used to produce a polyclonal antibody, characterized by western analysis for reactivity to native and collagenase-cleaved equine collagens. The antibody was evaluated as an antineoepitope antibody by ELISA, using peptides ± an amino acid at the C-terminus of the immunizing peptide. Collagen cleavage was assayed from equine articular cartilage cultured with interleukin-1 (IL-1), ± a synthetic MMP inhibitor, BAY 12-9566. Cartilage specimens from osteoarthritic and nonarthritic joints were compared for antibody staining.

Results—An antibody, 234CEQ, recognized only collagenase- generated 3/4-length fragments of equine type-II collagen. This was a true antineoepitope antibody, as altering the C-terminus of the immunizing peptide significantly decreased competition for binding in an inhibition ELISA. The IL-1-induced release of type-II collagen fragments from articular cartilage was prevented with the MMP inhibitor. Cartilage from an osteoarthritic joint of a horse had increased staining with the 234CEQ antibody, compared with normal articular cartilage.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—We generated an antineoepitope antibody recognizing collagenase- cleaved type-II collagen of horses. This antibody detects increases in type-II collagen cleavage in diseased equine articular cartilage. The 234CEQ antibody has the potential to aid in the early diagnosis of arthritis and to monitor treatment responses. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1031–1039)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether serum concentrations of biomarkers of skeletal metabolism can, in conjunction with radiographic evaluation, indicate severity of osteochondrosis in developing horses.

Animals—43 Dutch Warmblood foals with varying severity of osteochondrosis.

Procedure—24 foals were monitored for 5 months and 19 foals were monitored for 11 months. Monthly radiographs of femoropatellar-femorotibial and tibiotarsal joints were graded for osteochondral abnormalities. Serial blood samples were assayed for 8 cartilage and bone biomarkers. At the end of the monitoring period, foals were examined for macroscopic osteochondrosis lesions.

Results—Temporal relationships were evident between certain serum biomarkers and osteochondrosis severity in foals during their first year. Biomarkers of collagen degradation (collagenasegenerated neoepitopes of type-II collagen fragments, type-I and -II collagen fragments [COL2-3/4Cshort], and cross-linked telopeptide fragments of type-I collagen) and bone mineralization (osteocalcin) were positive indicators of osteochondrosis severity at 5 months of age. In foals with lesions at 11 months of age, osteochondrosis severity correlated negatively with COL2-3/4Cshort and osteocalcin and positively with C-propeptide of type-II procollagen (CPII), a collagen synthesis marker. Radiographic grading of osteochondrosis lesions significantly correlated with macroscopic osteochondrosis severity score at both ages and was strongest when combined with osteocalcin at 5 months and CPII at 11 months.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The ability of serum biomarkers to indicate osteochondrosis severity appears to depend on stage of disease and is strengthened with radiography. In older foals with more permanent lesions, osteochondrosis severity is significantly related to biomarker concentrations of decreased bone formation and increased cartilage synthesis. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:143–150)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate use of technetium Tc 99m disodium hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (99m-Tc- HDP) for assessing fracture healing and 99m-Tc-HDP and technetium Tc 99m ciprofloxacin (99m-Tc-CIPRO) for early diagnosis of osteomyelitis in rabbits.

Animals—32 skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits.

Procedure—A femoral fracture defect stabilized with bone plates and cortical screws was used. Scintigraphy was performed 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after surgery. The 99m-Tc-CIPRO scan was performed 48 hours after the 99m-Tc-HDP scan. The uptake ratio of the experimental limb to the normal limb was calculated by use of multiple regions of interest. Results of radiography performed to determine external callus and lysis grade and percentage defect ossification at 16 weeks were compared with scintigraphy results.

Results—Infected fractures had a higher uptake ratio for 99m-Tc-HDP and 99m-Tc-CIPRO than noninfected fractures. Infected fractures could be differentiated from noninfected fractures late in healing by use of 99m-Tc-HDP. Although 99m-Tc-CIPRO was better than 99m-Tc-HDP for identifying infection, there was a high incidence of false positive and negative results with 99m-Tc-CIPRO. There was an association between 99m-Tc-HDP uptake ratio and callus formation and a good correlation between 99m-Tc-HDP uptake ratio and defect ossification after 4 weeks.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—99m-Tc-HDP and 99m-Tc-CIPRO may be useful for diagnosing osteomyelitis late in fracture healing; however, false positive and false negative results occur. Technetium Tc 99m disodium hydroxymethylene diphosphonate may be useful for evaluating fracture healing. ( Am J Vet Res 2003;64:736–745)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of treadmill exercise on subchondral bone of carpal and metacarpophalangeal joints of 2-year-old horses.

Animals—12 healthy 2-year-old horses.

Procedure—Horses were randomly assigned to the control (n = 6) or exercised (6) groups. Horses in the exercised group ran on a high-speed treadmill 5 d/wk for 6 months. Horses in the control group were hand walked for the same amount of time. Results of clinical, radiographic, nuclear scintigraphic, and computed tomographic examinations, and serum and synovial concentrations of biochemical markers of bone metabolism were compared between groups.

Results—Exercised horses were significantly lamer at the end of the study than control horses. Radionuclide uptake in the metacarpal condyles, but not in the carpal joints, was greater in exercised horses, compared with control horses. Exercised horses also had a higher subchondral bone density in the metacarpal condyles than control horses, but such differences were not detected in the carpal bones.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—None of the diagnostic techniques evaluated was sufficiently sensitive to detect all osteochondral damage. Computed tomography and computed tomographic osteoabsorptiometry were superior to conventional radiography for detecting small osteochondral fragments. Nuclear scintigraphy was a sensitive indicator of subchondral bone change but lacked specificity for describing lesions and discerning normal bone remodeling from damage. Newer techniques such as computed tomography may help clinicians better diagnose early and subtle joint lesions in horses prior to development of gross joint damage. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1252–1258)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate whether cutting equine subchondral bone to demarcate specific regions of interest (ROIs) influences the mean density for that bone as measured via quantitative computed tomography (QCT).

Sample population—2 metacarpophalangeal joints from equine cadavers.

Procedures—The distal portion of the third metacarpal bone of each intact metacarpophalangeal joint was scanned via CT to simulate in vivo conditions. Each joint was subsequently disarticulated and dissected, and the distal portion of the dissected third metacarpal bone in air was scanned. Then, six 1-cm2 areas representing ROIs were cut into the distal condylar surfaces to depths of approximately 1 cm, and the bone was scanned again. Three-dimensional CT models of the 3 bone preparations were generated for each third metacarpal bone on the basis of data from each set of scan images, and densities of the 6 ROIs were measured. Mean bone densities for the 6 ROIs were compared among models of intact, dissected, and cut third metacarpal bone scans.

Results—Mean bone density was significantly lower in cut bone preparations, compared with that in intact or dissected bone. Differences between mean bone densities for intact and dissected bone preparations were not significant.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cutting subchondral bone to demarcate specific ROIs prior to CT imaging significantly lowered mean bone density as measured via QCT and thus introduced substantial artifacts. These findings have direct implications on techniques for CT modeling of equine subchondral bone in the characterization of joint diseases in horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research