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Abstract

Objective—To establish a safe and effective endoscopic technique for collection of liver biopsy specimens from lizards by use of a 2.7-mm rigid endoscope system that is commonly available in zoologic veterinary practice.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—11 subadult male green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

Procedures—Each lizard was anesthetized, and right-sided coelioscopic examination of the right liver lobe and gallbladder was performed. Three liver biopsy specimens were collected from each lizard by use of a 2.7-mm rigid endoscope and 1.7-mm (5-F) biopsy forceps. Biopsy samples were evaluated histologically for quality and crush artifact. Ten days following surgery, all iguanas were euthanatized and underwent full necropsy examination.

Results—For all 11 iguanas, the right liver lobe and gallbladder were successfully examined endoscopically, and 3 biopsy specimens of the liver were collected without complications. Mean ± SD durations of anesthesia and surgery were 24 ± 7 minutes and 6.8 ± 1.0 minutes, respectively. At necropsy, there was no evidence of trauma or disease associated with the skin or muscle entry sites, liver, or any visceral structures in any iguana. All 33 biopsy specimens were considered acceptable for histologic interpretation; in most samples, the extent of crush artifact was considered minimal.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—By use of a 2.7-mm rigid endoscope, liver biopsy procedures can be performed safely, swiftly, and easily in green iguanas. Biopsy specimens obtained by this technique are suitable for histologic examination. For evaluation of the liver and biopsy specimen collection in lizards, endoscopy is recommended.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate diagnostic quality of liver percutaneous ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirates and laparoscopic biopsy specimens of rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

Design—Prospective descriptive study.

Animals—7 healthy adult rabbits.

Procedures—3 to 5 liver fine-needle aspirates were obtained with a 22-gauge needle under ultrasound guidance in anesthetized rabbits. Liver biopsy specimens were also obtained with 1.7-mm (n = 2) or 3.0-mm (1) biopsy forceps by direct laparoscopic observation. Fine-needle aspirates were cytologically evaluated on a scale from 0 (suboptimal specimen) to 3 (optimal specimen) for cellularity, cell distribution, cell preservation, cell morphology, and blood contamination. Biopsy specimens were histologically evaluated on a scale from 0 (optimal specimen) to 5 (suboptimal specimen) for artifactual changes; numbers of portal triads and central veins were quantified.

Results—Aspirates were moderately to highly cellular (mean, 2.54) with good cell distribution (mean, 2.56), good cell preservation (mean, 2.20), and moderate blood contamination (mean, 1.04). The 1.7-mm biopsy specimens had a mean score of 1.3 for artifactual changes and contained a mean of 0.6 portal triads and 1.6 central veins/biopsy specimen. The 3.0-mm liver biopsy specimens had a mean score of 2.7 for artifactual changes, with a mean of 4.0 portal triads and 4.14 central veins/biopsy specimen. All but one 3.0-mm liver biopsy specimen had ≥ 1 portal triad suitable for histologic evaluation, and all had ≥ 1 central vein; in contrast, only half of the 1.7-mm liver biopsy specimens had a discernible portal triad or central vein.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—For histologic evaluation, advantages of obtaining 3.0-mm liver biopsy specimens, compared with 1.7-mm liver biopsy specimens or fine-needle aspirates, should be considered in rabbits with suspected liver disease.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate endoscopic liver biopsy and compare that technique with a standard coeliotomy biopsy technique in fish.

Design—Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—30 channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

Procedures—10 fish were randomly assigned into control, coeliotomy, and coelioscopy groups. Anesthesia was performed with a recirculating anesthesia machine. Body weight, PCV, and total protein (TP) concentration in blood as well as plasma activities of aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine phosphokinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and sorbitol dehydrogenase were measured before and after surgery. Standard ventral coeliotomy or coelioscopy was performed, and the biopsy specimens were scored histologically.

Results—Coeliotomy and coelioscopy procedures were well tolerated without acute deaths. Blood TP concentration and PCV decreased after surgery in the coelioscopy group because of intracoelomic fluid administration to aid visualization. Minor changes in activities for hepatic and muscular enzyme activities were apparent, but were not significantly different between the coelioscopy and coeliotomy groups. Coelioscopy and coeliotomy yielded biopsy specimens of similar diagnostic quality. However, coelioscopy permitted a more extensive evaluation of the viscera, and all 10 surgical wounds healed completely, compared with severe wound dehiscence in 3 of 10 fish that underwent coeliotomy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Both coelioscopy and coeliotomy were capable of yielding antemortem liver biopsy specimens of diagnostic quality in catfish. Coelioscopy permitted a more detailed examination of the coelomic viscera through a smaller surgical incision, was less traumatic, and resulted in decreased wound dehiscence.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate isoeugenol as an anesthetic agent in koi carp.

Animals—216 juvenile koi carp (Cyprinus carpio).

Procedures—Fish were randomly allocated to 9 groups of 24, and each group was randomly exposed to isoeugenol concentrations ranging from 0 to 500 mg/L. General activity, excitement, fin and gill color changes, opercular movement rate, loss of equilibrium, muscle tone, jaw tone, and handleability were assessed. Five fish from the control (0 mg/L), 200 mg/L, and 500 mg/L groups were randomly selected prior to anesthetic recovery and again 24 hours after recovery for euthanasia, gross necropsy, and histologic assessment of gills, internal viscera, and skeletal muscles.

Results—Mean ± SD interval to achieve stage 2 anesthesia with isoeugenol ranged from 22.4 ± 6.2 minutes at 20 mg/L to 0.25 ± 0.4 minutes at 500 mg/L, whereas the mean interval to stage 3 anesthesia ranged from 28.1 ± 3.9 minutes at 20 mg/L to 0.33 ± 0.48 minutes at 500 mg/L. With the exception of the 500 mg/L group, opercular movements were maintained throughout. Death was observed only in the 500 mg/L group, in which 50% of the fish either failed to recover or died within 24 hours after anesthetic exposure. There were no pathological differences between fish exposed to isoeugenol at 0 or 500 mg/L.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Isoeugenol appeared to have a wide margin of safety with predictable dose-related effects. Concentrations of 40 to 80 mg/L induced anesthesia within 4 to 11 minutes and were considerably less than the concentration associated with fish death.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess effects of photobiomodulation, silver sulfadiazine, and a topical antimicrobial product for the treatment of experimentally induced full-thickness skin wounds in green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

ANIMALS 16 healthy subadult green iguanas.

PROCEDURES Iguanas were anesthetized, and three 5-mm cutaneous biopsy specimens were obtained from each iguana (day 0). Iguanas were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups, each of which had a control treatment. Wounds in the topical treatment group received silver sulfadiazine, a topical antimicrobial product, or no treatment. Wounds in the laser treatment group received treatment with a class 4 laser at 5 or 10 J/cm2 or no treatment. Wound measurements were obtained daily for 14 days. Iguanas were euthanized, and treatment sites were evaluated microscopically to detect ulceration, bacterial contamination, reepithelialization, necrosis, inflammation, fibrosis, and collagen maturity.

RESULTS On day 14, wounds treated with a laser at 10 J/cm2 were significantly smaller than those treated with silver sulfadiazine, but there were no other significant differences among treatments. Histologically, there were no significant differences in ulceration, bacterial infection, reepithelialization, necrosis, inflammation, fibrosis, and collagen maturity among treatments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Photobiomodulation at 10 J/cm2 appeared to be a safe treatment that was tolerated well by green iguanas, but it did not result in substantial improvement in histologic evidence of wound healing, compared with results for other treatments or no treatment.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A client-owned 12-year-old 10.3-kg (22.7-lb) female shusui koi (Cyprinus carpio) was evaluated because of an ulcerated mass on the left body wall, hyporexia, and decreased activity.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The patient was anesthetized with a solution of eugenol in water for all examinations and procedures. An approximately 7 × 5-cm smooth, raised, ulcerated, and firm mass was present ventral and lateral to the dorsal fin on the left body wall. Whole-body CT images obtained before and after contrast administration revealed an encapsulated, homogeneous, fat-opaque mass within the muscle. The mass was fat echoic with poor vascularity on ultrasonographic examination. Histologic evaluation of an ultrasound-guided needle biopsy specimen was suggestive of a lipoma.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

The mass was excised, and the fish was placed in water with 0.3% salinity for 3 weeks after surgery. Postoperative antimicrobial administration was not indicated, and additional postoperative analgesic administration was considered impractical. The patient had noticeable improvement in appetite and activity with no indication of discomfort immediately following surgery. Five weeks after surgery, the incision site had healed with minimal scarring, and evaluation of CT images revealed no evidence of mass regrowth or regional osteomyelitis.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Antemortem evaluation and diagnosis of a lipoma in a teleost with subsequent excision was described. This report highlighted the logistic challenges associated with anesthesia, advanced diagnostic imaging, and surgery in fish and showed that they can be successfully overcome so that high-level medical care can be provided to such patients.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 16-year-old female umbrella cockatoo (Cacatua alba) was referred to the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine for evaluation of a 3-year seasonal history of lethargy and weight fluctuation.

Clinical Findings—Abnormalities detected via clinicopathologic analyses included mild leukocytosis, heterophilia, and lymphopenia consistent with a stress leukogram. Previous fecal examinations failed to diagnose enteric parasite infestation. Results of a fecal flotation test with Sheather sugar solution revealed spirurid eggs (Spiruroidea). Coelomic radiography revealed a widened cardiohepatic waist with increased soft tissue opacity at the level of the hepatic silhouette. The caudal thoracic and abdominal air sacs bilaterally appeared compressed against the coleomic wall. The proventriculus was increased in diameter, with a proventriculus-to-keel ratio of 1.0. Coelomic ultrasonography and positive-contrast upper gastrointestinal radiography revealed severe thickening and irregularity of the proventricular wall. The animal was anesthetized for an endoscopic examination of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Intralesional nematodes were identified on histologic examination of biopsy specimens from the proventriculus.

Treatment and Outcome—Effective fenbendazole treatment (15 mg/kg [6.8 mg/lb], PO, alternating between 5 days of treatment and 5 days of no treatment, which continued for 4 periods) was confirmed by repeated endoscopy and fecal examinations. The bird remained free of clinical signs 27 months after diagnosis and treatment.

Clinical Relevance—Antemortem diagnosis of proventricular nematodiasis has not been reported in psittacines. Spirurid nematode eggs are shed intermittently, which may lead to false-negative results on a single routine fecal examination. In this patient, radiography, endoscopy, and histologic evaluation facilitated antemortem diagnosis. This is the first report of successful treatment of this condition in psittacines.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 1-year-old sexually intact female Netherland dwarf rabbit was examined because of a 3-week history of signs of lethargy, decreased appetite, left unilateral exophthalmia, a previous draining sinus from a left maxillary facial abscess, and bilateral nasal discharge.

Clinical Findings—The rabbit weighed 1.0 kg (2.2 lb) and had a body condition score of 1.5/5. Physical examination revealed generalized muscle atrophy, bilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge, and severe left-sided exophthalmia. Diagnostic investigation revealed anemia, neutrophilia, severe dental disease, a superficial corneal ulcer of the left eye, and a retrobulbar abscess.

Treatment and Outcome—Stomatoscopy-aided dental trimming, tooth removal, and abscess debridement were performed. Antimicrobials were flushed into the tooth abscess cavity, and antimicrobial treatment was initiated on the basis of cytologic findings and results of bacterial culture and susceptibility testing.Two months after the initial surgery, minimal exophthalmia was evident and no further physical, radiographic, or ultrasonographic changes were evident.

Clinical Relevance—Stomatoscopy is a valuable technique that can facilitate diagnosis, treatment, and serial reevaluation of rabbits with dental disease.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association