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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

3 adult Basset Hounds were referred for evaluation of chronic, unilateral, pelvic limb lameness with no history of trauma.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

On examination, all dogs had mild lameness of the affected limb; signs of pain were evident during manipulation of the stifle joint in the affected limb, along with effusion of that joint. No stifle joint instability was palpable. Radiographs were available for review for 2 of the 3 dogs. Effusion was confirmed radiographically, but severity of degenerative joint disease varied. Central intercondylar notch width ratios for the 2 dogs were 0.16 and 0.17, and tibial plateau angles were −10° and 15°; relative tibial tuberosity width was 1.1 for both dogs. Exploratory arthroscopy revealed moderate degeneration of the caudal cruciate ligament in all 3 dogs; the cranial cruciate ligaments were grossly normal.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Corrective osteotomy to increase the tibial plateau angle was performed in 1 dog, and the lameness resolved by 2 months after surgery. The 2 other dogs were managed without additional surgery. One dog was persistently lame. The other dog reportedly had normal limb function 2.5 years after undergoing exploratory arthroscopy.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Morphological characteristics of the tibia in Basset Hounds may predispose to abnormal stresses on the caudal cruciate ligament. Isolated degeneration of the caudal cruciate ligament should be considered as a differential diagnosis for Basset Hounds with lameness originating from the stifle joint. Without direct inspection of the joint, caudal cruciate ligament disease could be confused for cranial cruciate ligament injury.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report clinical experience using virtual surgical planning (VSP) and surgical application of 3D printed custom surgical guides to facilitate uni- and biapical correction of antebrachial deformities in dogs.

ANIMALS

11 dogs (13 antebrachial deformity corrections).

PROCEDURES

Using CT-based bone models, VSP was performed, and surgical guides were designed and 3D printed. The guides were used to execute osteotomies and align bone segments. Postoperative CTs were obtained to compare limb alignment with the VSP. Long-term assessment of lameness and cosmesis were compared with preoperative status.

RESULTS

Guides were successfully utilized and postoperative analysis was available for 10 of 13 deformities. Guides were abandoned in 2 deformities due to soft tissue tension. Evaluation of postoperative frontal, sagittal, axial, and translational limb alignment revealed that over 90% of parameters were within the acceptable range of ≤ 5° angulation and rotation or ≤ 5 mm of translation from the VSP. Lameness scores were improved in 7/8 deformities with associated preoperative lameness, and posture was improved in 10/10 deformities in which guides were deployed. Complications included reduced range of carpal motion (n = 2), implant sensitivity (n = 2), fracture (n = 1), and tendon laceration (n = 1).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

VSP and customized surgical guide application facilitated accurate antebrachial limb deformity correction in the majority of deformities in this case series. The use of VSP and 3D printed guides would appear to be a viable and accurate approach for correction of both uni- and biapical antebrachial deformities in dogs.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare initial leak pressure (ILP) between cadaveric canine and synthetic small intestinal segments that did and did not undergo enterotomy.

SAMPLE

Eight 8-cm grossly normal jejunal segments from 1 canine cadaver and eight 8-cm synthetic small intestinal segments.

PROCEDURES

Intestinal segments were randomly assigned to undergo enterotomy (6 cadaveric and 6 synthetic segments) or serve as untreated controls (2 cadaveric and 2 synthetic segments). For segments designated for enterotomy, a 2-cm full-thickness incision was created along the antimesenteric border. The incision was closed in a single layer with 4-0 suture in a simple continuous pattern. Leak testing was performed with intestinal segments occluded at both ends and infused with dilute dye solution (999 mL/h) until the solution was observed leaking from the suture line or serosal tearing occurred. Intraluminal pressure was continuously monitored. The ILP at construct failure was compared between cadaveric and synthetic control segments and between cadaveric and synthetic enterotomy segments.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD ILP did not differ significantly between cadaveric (345.11 ± 2.15 mm Hg) and synthetic (329.04 ± 24.69 mm Hg) control segments but was significantly greater for cadaveric enterotomy segments (60.77 ± 15.81 mm Hg), compared with synthetic enterotomy segments (15.03 ± 6.41 mm Hg).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Leak testing should not be used to assess the accuracy or security of enterotomy suture lines in synthetic intestinal tissue. Synthetic intestinal tissue is best used for students to gain confidence and proficiency in performing enterotomies before performing the procedure on live animals.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To develop a device intended for gradual venous occlusion over 4 to 6 weeks.

SAMPLE Silicone tubing filled with various inorganic salt and polyacrylic acid (PAA) formulations and mounted within a polypropylene or polyether ether ketone (PEEK) outer ring.

PROCEDURES 15 polypropylene prototype rings were initially filled with 1 of 5 formulations and placed in PBSS. In a second test, 10 polypropylene and 7 PEEK prototype rings were filled with 1 formulation and placed in PBSS. In a third test, 2 formulations were loaded into 6 PEEK rings each, placed in physiologic solution, and incubated. In all tests, ring luminal diameter, outer diameter, and luminal area were measured over 6 weeks.

RESULTS In the first test, 2 formulations had the greatest changes in luminal area and diameter, and 1 of those had a greater linear swell rate than the other had. In the second test, 6 of 7 PEEK rings and 6 of 10 polypropylene rings closed to a luminal diamater < 1 mm within 6 weeks. Polypropylene rings had a greater increase in outer diameter than did PEEK rings between 4.5 and 6 weeks. In the third test, 11 of 12 PEEK rings gradually closed to a luminal diameter < 1 mm within 6 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A PAA and inorganic salt formulation in a prototype silicone and polymer ring resulted in gradual occlusion over 4 to 6 weeks in vitro. Prototype PEEK rings provided more reliable closure than did polypropylene rings.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare accuracy of a noninvasive single-plane fluoroscopic technique with radiostereometric analysis (RSA) for determining 3-D femorotibial poses in a canine cadaver with normal stifle joints.

Sample—Right pelvic limb from a 25-kg adult mixed-breed dog.

Procedures—A CT scan of the limb was obtained before and after metal beads were implanted into the right femur and tibia. Orthogonal fluoroscopic images of the right stifle joint were acquired to simulate a biplanar fluoroscopic acquisition setup. Images were obtained at 5 flexion angles from 110° to 150° to simulate a gait cycle; 5 cycles were completed. Joint poses were calculated from the biplanar images by use of RSA with CT-derived beaded bone models and compared with measurements obtained by use of CT-derived nonbeaded bone models matched to single-plane, lateral-view fluoroscopic images. Single-plane measurements were performed by 2 observers and repeated 3 times by the primary observer.

Results—Mean absolute differences between the single-plane fluoroscopic analysis and RSA measurements were 0.60, 1.28, and 0.64 mm for craniocaudal, proximodistal, and mediolateral translations, respectively, and 0.63°, 1.49°, and 1.58° for flexion-extension, abduction-adduction, and internal-external rotations, respectively. Intra- and interobserver repeatability was strong with maximum mean translational and rotational SDs of 0.52 mm and 1.36°, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that single-plane fluoroscopic analysis performed by use of CT-derived bone models is a valid, noninvasive technique for accurately measuring 3-D femorotibial poses in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare accuracy of a noninvasive single-plane fluoroscopic analysis technique with radiostereometric analysis (RSA) for determining 3-D femorotibial poses in a canine cadaver stifle joint treated by tibial-plateau-leveling osteotomy (TPLO).

Sample—Left pelvic limb from a 25-kg adult mixed-breed dog.

Procedures—A CT scan of the left pelvic limb was performed. The left cranial cruciate ligament was transected, and a TPLO was performed. Radiopaque beads were implanted into the left femur and tibia, and the CT scan was repeated. Orthogonal fluoroscopic images of the left stifle joint were acquired at 5 stifle joint flexion angles ranging from 110° to 150° to simulate a gait cycle; 5 gait cycles were completed. Joint poses were calculated from the biplanar images by use of a digitally modified RSA and were compared with measurements obtained by use of hybrid implant-bone models matched to lateral-view fluoroscopic images. Single-plane measurements were performed by 2 observers and repeated 3 times by the primary observer.

Results—Mean absolute differences between results of the single-plane fluoroscopic analysis and modified RSA were 0.34, 1.05, and 0.48 mm for craniocaudal, proximodistal, and mediolateral translations, respectively, and 0.56°, 0.85°, and 1.08° for flexion-extension, abduction-adduction, and internal-external rotations, respectively. Intraobserver and interobserver mean SDs did not exceed 0.59 mm for all translations and 0.93° for all rotations.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that single-plane fluoroscopic analysis by use of hybrid implant-bone models may be a valid, noninvasive technique for accurately measuring 3-D femorotibial poses in dogs treated with TPLO.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the closure rate and completeness of closure for a silicone–polyacrylic acid gradual venous occlusion device placed around an intra-abdominal vein to simulate gradual occlusion of an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt.

ANIMALS 3 purpose-bred cats and 2 purpose-bred dogs.

PROCEDURES The device was surgically placed around an external (cats) or internal (dogs) iliac vein. Computed tomographic angiography was performed at the time of surgery and 2, 4, and 6 weeks after surgery. Ultrasonographic examinations of blood flow through the vein within the device were performed at the time of surgery and at weekly intervals thereafter. Dogs were euthanized 6 weeks after surgery, and the external iliac veins were harvested for histologic examination.

RESULTS The prototype gradual venous occlusion device was successfully placed in all animals, and all animals recovered without complications following the placement procedure. The vessel was completely occluded in 2 cats by 6 weeks after surgery, as determined on the basis of results of CT and ultrasonography; there was incomplete occlusion with a luminal diameter of 1.5 mm in the other cat by 6 weeks after surgery. The vessel was completely occluded in both dogs by 6 weeks after surgery. Histologic examination of the external iliac veins obtained from the dogs revealed minimal inflammation of the vessel wall and no thrombus formation.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The prototype device induced gradual attenuation of an intra-abdominal vessel over a 6-week period. This device may provide another option for gradual occlusion of extrahepatic portosystemic shunts.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

OBJECTIVE

To quantify 3-D femorotibial joint kinematics during ambulation in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture treated with lateral fabellotibial suture stabilization (LFTS).

ANIMALS

9 adult dogs (body weight, 15 to 35 kg [33 to 77 lb]) with unilateral complete CCL rupture.

PROCEDURES

Digital 3-D bone models of the femur and fabellae and tibia and fibula were created from CT scans. Lateral fluoroscopic images of stifle joints were collected during treadmill walking before surgery and 6 months after LFTS. The LFTS was performed with nylon leader material secured with knots. Gait cycles were analyzed with a 3-D to 2-D image registration process. Femorotibial joint kinematics (craniocaudal translation, internal-external rotation, and flexion and extension angles) were compared among CCL-deficient stifle joints before LFTS, CCL-deficient stifle joints 6 months after LFTS, and unaffected contralateral (control) stifle joints. Owners and veterinarians subjectively assessed lameness by use of a visual analog scale and gait examination, respectively, at each time point.

RESULTS

At midstance phase, medial cranial tibial translation decreased from 9.3 mm before LFTS to 7.6 mm after LFTS but remained increased when compared with control stifle joint values. Following LFTS, axial rotation and stifle joint flexion and extension angles were not significantly different from control stifle joints. On the owner survey, the median walking lameness score improved from 9.3 of 10 before surgery to 0.3 after surgery. On gait examination, median walking lameness score improved from 2 of 4 before surgery to 0 after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Stifle joint instability was only slightly mitigated at 6 months following LFTS performed with knotted nylon leader material in medium to large dogs with CCL rupture, despite improvement in lameness.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the feasibility and accuracy of using 2 methods for reduction and alignment of simulated comminuted diaphyseal tibial fractures in conjunction with 3-D–printed patient-specific pin guides.

SAMPLE

Paired pelvic limbs from 8 skeletally mature dogs weighing 20 to 35 kg.

METHODS

CT images of both tibiae were obtained, and 3-D reconstructions of the tibiae were used to create proximal and distal patient-specific pin guides. These guides were printed and used to facilitate fracture reduction and alignment in conjunction with either a 3-D–printed reduction guide or a linear type 1A external fixator. Postreduction CT images were used to assess the accuracy of pin guide placement and the accuracy of fracture reduction and alignment.

RESULTS

The 3-D–printed guides were applied with acceptable ease. Guides for both groups were placed with minor but detectable deviations from the planned location (P = .01), but deviations were not significantly different between groups. Fracture reduction resulted in similar minor but detectable morphological differences from the intact tibiae (P = .01). In both groups, fracture reduction and alignment were within clinically acceptable parameters for fracture stabilization by means of minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Virtual surgical planning and fabrication of patient-specific 3-D–printed pin guides have the potential to facilitate fracture reduction and alignment during use of minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis for fracture stabilization.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the association between preoperative carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) and the development of surgical site infections (SSIs) following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) in dogs.

Design—Prospective multicenter study.

Animals—549 dogs.

Procedures—At 7 veterinary hospitals, swab specimens were obtained from the pharynx, nares, rectum, and skin of dogs admitted for TPLO. Specimens were submitted for culture of MRSP. For each dog, information regarding preoperative and postoperative antimicrobial administration, comorbidities, contact with other dogs, and whether the dog developed an SSI was obtained. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify variables associated with preoperative and postoperative MRSP colonization and the development of an SSI.

Results—Of the 549 study dogs, 24 (4.4%) were identified as MRSP carriers before TPLO and 37 (6.7%) developed an SSI after TPLO. Bacteriologic culture was performed on specimens obtained from 32 of the 37 SSIs, and MRSP was isolated from 11 (34%). Carriers of MRSP (OR, 6.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.12 to 21.4) and Bulldogs (OR, 11.1; 95% CI, 2.07 to 59.3) were at risk for development of an SSI after TPLO, whereas postoperative administration of antimicrobials (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.15 to 0.91) appeared to protect against development of an SSI.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that carriage of MRSP were a risk factor for development of an SSI after TPLO and measures to rapidly identify and treat MRSP carriers are warranted. Postoperative administration of antimicrobials protected against development of an SSI after TPLO.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association