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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate longevity, milk production, and breeding performance in adult Holstein cows fed either a plasma-derived commercial colostrum replacer (CR) or raw bovine maternal colostrum (MC) at birth.

Design—Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—497 heifer calves born in 12 commercial dairies located in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Procedures—All calves were separated from their dams within 30 to 60 minutes after birth and systematically assigned to be fed either MC (control group [n = 261 calves]) or CR (treatment group [236]). Calves were observed from birth up to adulthood (approx 54 months old), during which time death and culling events plus milk yield and breeding performance data were collected. Time to death, time to culling, time to death or culling combined, time to first calving, and time to conception intervals were evaluated by use of proportional hazards survival analysis models. Number of times inseminated per conception and lifetime milk yield (up to 54 months old) were evaluated by use of general linear models.

Results—Cows fed CR as calves at the time of birth were no different than cows fed MC as calves with respect to overall risk of death, culling, or death or culling combined (from birth to 54 months of follow-up and from first calving to 54 months old); lifetime milk yield; and breeding performance.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—No difference was detected in overall risk of death or culling, milk production, or reproductive performance between cows fed CR and those fed MC as calves at birth.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To develop a better system for classification of herd infection status for paratuberculosis (Johne's disease [JD]) in US cattle herds on the basis of the risk of potential transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratubeculosis.

Sample—Simulated data for herd size and within-herd prevalence; sensitivity and specificity for test methods obtained from consensus-based estimates.

Procedures—Interrelationships among variables influencing interpretation and classification of herd infection status for JD were evaluated by use of simulated data for various herd sizes, true within-herd prevalences, and sampling and testing methods. The probability of finding ≥ 1 infected animal in herds was estimated for various testing methods and sample sizes by use of hypergeometric random sampling.

Results—2 main components were required for the new herd JD classification system: the probability of detection of infection determined on the basis of test results from a sample of animals and the maximum detected number of animals with positive test results. Tables were constructed of the estimated probability of detection of infection, and the maximum number of cattle with positive test results or fecal pools with positive culture results with 95% confidence for classification of herd JD infection status were plotted. Herd risk for JD was categorized on the basis of 95% confidence that the true within-herd prevalence was ≤ 15%, ≤ 10%, ≤ 5%, or ≤ 2%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Analysis of the findings indicated that a scientifically rigorous and transparent herd classification system for JD in cattle is feasible.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

The report provided here contains a simplified set of diagnostic testing recommendations. These recommendations were developed on the basis of research funded by the USDA–Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service–Veterinary Services through a cooperative agreement. The report is intended to provide simple, practical, cost-effective consensus testing recommendations for cattle herds that are not enrolled in the US Test-Negative Program. The information has been reviewed by paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) experts at the USDA and academic centers as well as stakeholders in various segments of the cattle industry. The recommendations were accepted by the National Johne's Working Group and Johne's Disease Committee of the US Animal Health Association during their annual meetings in October 2006.

The report is intended to aid veterinarians who work with cattle producers in the United States. The recommendations are based on information available up to October 2006. There is a paucity of large-scale, high-quality studies of multiple tests conducted on samples obtained from the same cattle. It is understood that there may be special circumstances that require deviation from these recommendations. Furthermore, as new information becomes available and assays are improved and their accuracy is critically evaluated, changes to these recommendations may be necessary.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of vaccination with a killed whole-cell vaccine against Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) on fecal shedding of the organism, development of clinical paratuberculosis (Johne's disease [JD]), milk production, measures of reproduction, and within-herd longevity of dairy cattle naturally exposed to MAP.

Design—Controlled clinical trial.

Animals—200 vaccinated and 195 unvaccinated (control) dairy cows from 3 herds in Wisconsin.

Procedures—Every other heifer calf born in each herd received the MAP vaccine; 162 vaccinates and 145 controls that had ≥ 1 lactation were included in analyses. Bacteriologic culture of fecal samples for MAP was performed annually for 7 years; results were confirmed via histologic methods and PCR assay. Production records and culture results were evaluated to determine effects of vaccination on variables of interest in study cows. Annual whole-herd prevalence of MAP shedding in feces was also determined.

Results—Vaccinates had a significantly lower hazard of testing positive for MAP via culture of fecal samples than did controls over time (hazard ratio, 0.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.34 to 0.97). Fewer vaccinates developed clinical JD than did controls (n = 6 and 12, respectively), but these differences were nonsignificant. Overall within-herd longevity, total milk production, and calving-to-conception intervals were similar between vaccinates and controls. In all herds, prevalence of MAP shedding in feces decreased over time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Vaccination with a killed whole-cell MAP vaccine appeared to be an effective tool as part of a program to control the spread of JD in dairy cattle.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine growth, morbidity, and mortality rates in dairy calves fed pasteurized nonsaleable milk versus commercial milk replacer and compare economics of feeding pasteurized nonsaleable milk versus commercial milk replacer in dairy calves.

Design—Clinical trial.

Animals—438 dairy calves.

Procedure—Calves were assigned at 1 to 2 days of age to be fed pasteurized nonsaleable milk or a commercial milk replacer until weaned. Body weight was measured at the time of study enrollment and at the time of weaning, and any medical treatments administered and deaths that occurred prior to weaning were recorded. A partial budget model was developed to examine the economics of feeding pasteurized nonsaleable milk versus commercial milk replacer.

Results—Calves fed conventional milk replacer had significantly lower rates of gain (–0.12 kg/d [–0.26 lb/d]), lower weaning weights (–5.6 kg [–12.3 lb]), higher risk for treatment during the summer and winter months (odds ratio [OR], 3.99), and higher risk of death during the winter months (OR, 29.81) than did calves fed pasteurized nonsaleable milk. The estimated savings of feeding pasteurized nonsaleable milk, compared with milk replacer, was $0.69/calf per day. The estimated number of calves needed to economically justify the nonsaleable milk pasteurization system was 23 calves/d.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that dairy calves fed pasteurized nonsaleable milk have a higher growth rate and lower morbidity and mortality rates than do calves fed conventional milk replacer. Feeding pasteurized nonsaleable milk could be an economically viable strategy for dairy calf producers. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:1547–1554)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To estimate the prevalence of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis infection among cows on beef operations in the United States.

Design—Cross-sectional seroprevalence study.

Sample Population—A convenience sample of 380 herds in 21 states.

Procedure—Serum samples were obtained from 10,371 cows and tested for antibodies to M avium subsp paratuberculosis with a commercial ELISA . Producers were interviewed to collect data on herd management practices.

Results—30 (7.9%) herds had 1 or more animals for which results of the ELISA were positive; 40 (0.4%) of the individual cow samples yielded positive results. None of the herd management practices studied were found to be associated with whether any animals in the herd would be positive for antibodies to M avium subsp paratuberculosis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that the prevalence of antibodies to M avium subsp paratuberculosis among beef cows in the United States is low. Herds with seropositive animals were widely distributed geographically. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:497–501)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate use of crotalid antivenom, frequency of hypersensitivity reactions, and risk factors for hypersensitivity reactions and death in envenomed cats.

Design—Retrospective multicenter case series.

Animals—115 envenomed cats treated with antivenom and 177 envenomed cats treated without antivenom.

Procedures—Medical records from 5 institutions were searched by means of a multiple-choice survey with standardized answers for patient data including signalment, diagnosis, antivenom administration criteria, premedication, product, dose, administration rate, hypersensitivity reactions, and mortality rate.

Results—95 of 115 (82.6%) cats received whole IgG antivenom, 11 (9.57%) received F(ab′)2 antivenom, and 4 (3.48%) received Fab antivenom. The majority (101/115 [878%]) of cats received 1 vial of antivenom. In all cats, the median dilution of antivenom was 1:60 (range, 1:10 to 1:250) administered over a median period of 2.0 hours (range, 0.3 to 9.0 hours). There was no mortality rate difference between cats that did (6.67%) or did not (5.08%) receive antivenom. A type I hypersensitivity reaction was diagnosed in 26 of 115 (22.6%) cats. The use of premedications did not decrease type I hypersensitivity or improve mortality rate. Cats that had a type I hypersensitivity reaction were 10 times as likely to die as were those that did not have such a reaction.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The mortality rate of cats treated with antivenom was low. The administration of premedications did not improve mortality rate or prevent hypersensitivity reactions. The only variable associated with mortality rate was development of a type I hypersensitivity reaction. The rate of antivenom administration should be further evaluated as a possible risk factor for type I hypersensitivity reactions.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate sensitivities at the herd level of test strategies used in the Voluntary Johne's Disease Herd Status Program (VJDHSP) and alternative test strategies for detecting dairy cattle herds infected with Mycobacterium paratuberculosis.

Design—Nonrandom cross-sectional study.

Sample Population—64 dairy herds from Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Colorado, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Fifty-six herds had at least 1 cow shedding M paratuberculosis in feces; the other 8 herds were free from paratuberculosis.

Procedure—For all adult cows in each herd, serum samples were tested for antibodies to M paratuberculosis with an ELISA, and fecal samples were submitted for bacterial culture for M paratuberculosis. Sensitivities at the herd level (probability of detecting infected herd) of various testing strategies were then evaluated.

Results—Sensitivity at the herd level of the testing strategy used in level 1 of the VJDHSP (use of the ELISA to test samples from 30 cows followed by confirmatory bacterial culture of feces from cows with positive ELISA result) ranged from 33 to 84% for infected herds, depending on percentage of cows in the herd with positive bacterial culture results. If follow- up bacterial culture was not used to confirm positive ELISA results, sensitivity ranged from 70 to 93%, but probability of identifying uninfected herds as infected was 89%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that the testing strategy used in the VJDHSP will fail to identify as infected most dairy herds with a low prevalence of paratuberculosis. A higher percentage of infected herds was detected if follow-up bacterial culture was not used, but this test strategy was associated with a high probability of misclassifying uninfected herds. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220: 1053–1057)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in Campylobacter spp isolated from dairy cattle and farms managed organically and conventionally in the midwestern and northeastern United States.

Design—Longitudinal study.

Sample Population—128 farms.

Procedure—Samples and data were collected every 2 months from August 2000 to October 2001. Fecal samples were collected from calves and cows. Milk samples were obtained from the bulk tank and milk line filters. Environmental samples were obtained from a water source, feed bunks of lactating cows, and cattle housing areas. Campylobacter identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed at a central laboratory by use of microbroth dilution with 2 customized antimicrobial susceptibility panels.

Results—460 and 1,570 Campylobacter isolates were obtained from organic and conventional dairy farms, respectively. Most isolates from both farm types were susceptible to most antimicrobial agents tested, and antimicrobial susceptibility of conventional dairy isolates was decreased, compared with organic dairy isolates. Low proportions of isolates resistant to ampicillin (< 10%) and moderate proportions resistant (30% to 60%) to kanamycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline were observed on both farm types. The proportion of isolates resistant to tetracycline was higher for conventional than organic farms.

Conclusions and Clinical RelevanceCampylobacter isolates from dairy cattle and farms managed organically and conventionally had similar patterns of antimicrobial resistance; the proportion of resistant isolates was higher for conventional than organic farms.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe the occurrence of fecal shedding, persistence of shedding over time, and serogroup classification of Salmonella spp on a large number of dairy farms of various sizes.

Design—Longitudinal study.

Sample Population—22,417 fecal samples from cattle and 4,570 samples from the farm environment on 110 organic and conventional dairy farms in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and New York.

Procedure—5 visits were made to each farm at 2-month intervals from August 2000 to October 2001. Fecal samples from healthy cows, calves, and other targeted cattle groups and samples from bulk tank milk, milk line filters, water, feed sources, and pen floors were collected at each visit. Bacterial culture was performed at 1 laboratory.

ResultsSalmonella spp were isolated from 4.8% of fecal samples and 5.9% of environmental samples; 92.7% of farms had at least 1 Salmonella-positive sample. The 75th percentile for median within-herd prevalence of Salmonella spp in cattle for 5 sampling visits to a given farm was 2.0% and for maximum within-herd prevalence of Salmonella spp was 13.6%. Farms with a median within-herd prevalence of Salmonella spp of ≥ 2.0% accounted for 76.3% of Salmonella-positive samples. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of Salmonella spp between conventional and organic farms. Seasonal differences in Salmonella shedding were observed. More farms had at least 1 serogroup B isolate than any other serogroup, whereas serogroup E1 was the most common among all Salmonella-positive samples. More than 1 serogroup was isolated on 76.4% of Salmonella-positive farms.

Conclusions and Clinical RelevanceSalmonella spp were isolated from > 90% of dairy farms; however, 25% of farms accounted for > 75% of Salmonella-positive samples. This information is critical for the direction of intervention strategies to decrease the prevalence of Salmonella spp on dairy farms. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:567–573)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association