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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate adrenal sex hormone concentrations in neutered dogs with hypercortisolemia.

Design—Case series.

Animals—11 neutered dogs with hypercortisolemia.

Procedure—Serum samples obtained before and 1 hour after administration of ACTH were evaluated for concentrations of cortisol, progesterone, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate or androstenedione or both, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone.

Results—For all dogs, concentrations of 1 or more adrenal sex hormones were substantially greater than reference range values before or after administration of ACTH. Testosterone concentration was not greater than reference range values in any of the dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results emphasize the importance of ruling out hypercortisolemia before measuring adrenal sex hormone concentrations as a means of diagnosing adrenal hyperplasia syndrome (alopecia X) in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:214–216)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine frequency with which Staphylococcus schleiferi could be isolated from dogs with pyoderma and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of isolates that were obtained.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—54 dogs with a first (n = 14) or recurrent (40) episode of pyoderma.

Procedure—Specimens were obtained and submitted for bacterial culture. Isolates were identified as S schleiferi on the basis of growth and biochemical characteristics. Two isolates were submitted for DNA sequencing to confirm identification. Methicillin susceptibility was determined by means of disk diffusion with oxacillin-impregnated disks.

Results—3 of 14 dogs examined because of a first episode of pyoderma and 12 of 40 dogs examined because of a recurrent episode of pyoderma were receiving antimicrobials at the time of specimen collection. Staphylococcus schleiferi was not isolated from any dog with first-time pyoderma but was isolated from 5 dogs with recurrent pyoderma that were not receiving antimicrobials at the time of specimen collection and 10 dogs with recurrent pyoderma that were receiving antimicrobials. Nine isolates were identified as S schleiferi subsp schleiferi, and 6 were identified as S schleiferi subsp coagulans. All S schleiferi subsp schleiferi isolates were resistant to methicillin, but only 2 S schleiferi subsp coagulans isolates were. Two methicillin-resistant isolates were also resistant to fluoroquinolones, and 1 isolate had intermediate susceptibility to fluoroquinolones.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that S schleiferi subsp schleiferi and S schleiferi subsp coagulans may be isolated from dogs with recurrent pyoderma. Although isolates from dogs with pyoderma were frequently resistant to methicillin, multiple drug resistance was uncommon. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:451–454)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (T/SMX) on thyroid function in dogs.

Animals—6 healthy euthyroid dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were administered T/SMX (14.1 to 16 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) for 3 weeks. Blood was collected weekly for 6 weeks for determination of total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (fT4), and canine thyroid- stimulating hormone (cTSH) concentrations. Schirmer tear tests were performed weekly. Blood was collected for CBC prior to antimicrobial treatment and at 3 and 6 weeks.

Results—5 dogs had serum TT4 concentrations equal to or less than the lower reference limit, and 4 dogs had serum fT4 less than the lower reference limit after 3 weeks of T/SMX administration; cTSH concentrations were greater than the upper reference limit in 4 dogs. All dogs had TT4 and fT4 concentrations greater than the lower reference limit after T/SMX administration was discontinued for 1 week, and cTSH concentrations were less than reference range after T/SMX administration was discontinued for 2 weeks. Two dogs developed decreased tear production, which returned to normal after discontinuing administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that administration of T/SMX at a dosage of 14.1 to 16 mg/kg, PO, every 12 hours for 3 weeks caused decreased TT4 and fT4 concentrations and increased cTSH concentration, conditions that would be compatible with a diagnosis of hypothyroidism. Therefore, dogs should not have thyroid function evaluated while receiving this dosage of T/SMX for > 2 weeks. These results are in contrast to those of a previous study of trimethoprim- sulfadiazine. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:256–259)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the methicillin-resistant profile of staphylococcal isolates from the skin of dogs with pyoderma.

Animals—90 dogs with pyoderma.

Procedure—Staphylococci isolated from dogs with pyoderma were tested for susceptibility to methicillin by use of a standard disk diffusion test with oxacillin disks. The DNA extracted from the isolates was tested for the mecA gene that encodes the penicillinbinding protein 2a (PBP2a) by use of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The expression of PBP2a was determined with a commercial latex agglutination assay. Species of staphylococcal isolates were identified by use of morphologic, biochemical, and enzymatic tests.

Results—Most of the isolated staphylococci were methicillin-susceptible, coagulase-positive Staphylococcus intermedius isolates. Whereas only 2 of 57 S intermedius isolates were resistant to methicillin, approximately half of the isolates had the mecA gene and produced PBP2a. Staphylococcus schleiferi was the second most common isolate. Widespread resistance to methicillin was found among S schleiferi isolates. More coagulase-negative S schleiferi isolates were identified with mecA gene-mediated resistance to methicillin, compared with coagulase-positive S schleiferi isolates.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The latex agglutination assay for the detection of PBP2a expression coupled with the PCR assay for the mecA gene may provide new information about emerging antimicrobial resistance among staphylococcal isolates. (Am J Vet Res2004;65:1265–1268)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the frequency of isolation and susceptibility patterns of Staphylococcus schleiferi from healthy dogs and dogs with otitis, pyoderma, or both that had or had not received antimicrobial treatment.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—50 dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were allocated to 1 of 4 groups: healthy dogs (n = 13), dogs without otitis but with pyoderma (10), dogs with otitis but without pyoderma (11), and dogs with otitis and pyoderma (16). Bacteriologic culture of ear swab specimens was performed in all dogs. Bacteriologic culture of skin swab specimens was also performed in dogs with concurrent pyoderma. Isolates were identified as S schleiferi subsp schleiferi or S schleiferi subsp coagulanson the basis of growth and biochemical characteristics.

ResultsS schleiferi was not isolated from any dogs with pyoderma only. Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp schleiferi was isolated from the ears of 2 healthy dogs, and the skin and ears of 2 dogs and the skin of 1 dog with otitis and pyoderma. Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp coagulans was isolated from the ears of 3 dogs with otitis only, and the ears of 6 dogs and the skin of 2 dogs with otitis and pyoderma. One of the S schleiferi subsp schleiferi isolates from ears, 2 of the S schleiferi subsp coagulansisolates from ears, and 1 of the S schleiferi subsp coagulansisolates from the skin were resistant to methicillin. One methicillin-resistant isolate from the ears and 1 from the skin were also resistant to fluoroquinolones.

Conclusions and Clinical RelevanceS schleiferi subsp schleiferiwas detected in healthy dogs and dogs with otitis and pyoderma. Methicillin-resistant and -susceptible S schleiferi subsp schleiferi and S schleiferi subsp coagulans were detected as the predominant organisms in dogs with otitis. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:928–931)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether resistance to oxacillin and other antimicrobials in 3 Staphylococcus spp commonly isolated from dogs increased from 2001 to 2005.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Sample Population—1,772 clinical samples of various types obtained from dogs examined at the University of Tennessee Veterinary Teaching Hospital or at regional veterinary hospitals and submitted to the bacteriology and mycology laboratories associated with the teaching hospital.

Procedures—Samples were submitted by attending veterinarians to the bacteriology and mycology laboratories for routine aerobic microbial culture. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility procedures were performed on all isolates. Susceptibility reports for each antimicrobial and Staphylococcus spp were determined from aggregate electronically archived test results. Oxacillin and multidrug resistance for Staphylococcus intermedius was analyzed by reviewing disk diffusion zone measurements.

Results—Oxacillin resistance increased among S intermedius isolates during the past 5 years, and the increase was associated with multidrug resistance. In 2005, 1 in 5 Staphylococcus spp isolates from canine clinical samples was resistant to oxacillin. The most common staphylococcal species isolated were S intermedius (n = 37), Staphylococcus schleiferi (21), and Staphylococcus aureus (4), and frequencies of oxacillin resistance in isolates of these species were 15.6%, 46.6%, and 23.5%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Veterinarians should be aware of the potential for empiric drug treatment failures in instances where Staphylococcus spp infections are common (eg, pyoderma). Judicious use of bacterial culture and susceptibility testing is recommended.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize the L1 gene of papillomaviruses detected in epithelial lesions of cats and to determine the relationship between those L1 gene nucleotide sequences and known L1 gene sequences of human and feline papillomaviruses.

Sample Population—10 tissue samples of epithelial lesions from 8 cats.

Procedures—DNA was extracted from tissue samples. Primers were designed to amplify the L1 gene of papillomaviruses. Amplicons of DNA were sequenced; nucleotide sequences were compared with known L1 gene nucleotide sequences of papillomaviruses and used for phylogenetic analysis.

Results—Tissue samples were obtained from lesions (diagnosed as dysplasia [n = 1], squamous cell carcinoma in situ [3], or squamous cell carcinoma [6]) of the skin (9) and oral mucosa [1]. Two amplicons had 99% homology with the L1 gene nucleotide sequence of human papillomavirus type 38b subtype FA125. Another amplicon had 84% homology with the L1 gene nucleotide sequence of human papillomavirus type 80 and was considered to be a new type of papillomavirus. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that these 3 papillomaviruses were grouped into 2 clades that were not similar to the clades of Felis domesticus papillomavirus type 1 or F domesticus papillomavirus type 2 (FdPV2). The remaining 7 amplicons had 98% to 100% homology with the L1 gene nucleotide sequence of FdPV2. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that those 7 papillomaviruses were grouped nto a single clade with FdPV2.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results support the likelihood of transmission of papillomaviruses between humans and cats.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) and methicillin-susceptible S pseudintermedius (MSSP) infections in dogs.

Design—Multicenter case-control study.

Animals—Dogs with MRSP infections were matched, by hospital, with 2 MSSP controls, with the infections occurring immediately before and after the case infection.

Procedures—Signalment, historical, clinical, treatment, and outcome data were documented. Conditional logistic regression was performed. A manual stepwise backward elimination procedure was used to build the multivariable model.

Results—56 case and 112 control dogs were enrolled. Pyoderma was the most common infection type in both groups. In the final multivariable model, systemic administration of antimicrobials within 30 days prior to infection was significantly associated with an MRSP versus an MSSP infection (OR, 9.9; 95% confidence interval, 3.59 to 27.53).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The association of prior antimicrobial administration and MRSP infection indicated the potential impact of routine antimicrobial use in veterinary medicine on antimicrobial resistance and the need for prudent use of these important drugs. Mortality rate was not significantly different between MRSP and MSSP infections; the lack of a significant difference suggested that MRSP was inherently no more virulent than MSSP, provided the infection was properly diagnosed and appropriate treatment was started. Basic concepts such as prudent antimicrobial use and early diagnosis through timely submission of appropriate culture specimens therefore can be important measures to try to reduce the impact of this pathogen.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine the effect of oral melatonin (MT) administration on serum concentrations of sex hormones, prolactin, and thyroxine in dogs.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

8 male and 8 female adult sexually intact dogs.

Procedure

5 male and 5 female dogs were treated with MT (1.0 to 1.3 mg/kg [0.45 to 0.59 mg/lb] of body weight), PO, every 12 hours for 28 days; the other 6 dogs were used as controls. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 14, and 28, and serum concentrations of estradiol-17β, progesterone, testosterone, androstenedione, 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-HP), dihydroepiandrostenedione sulfate (DHEAS), prolactin, and thyroxine were determined. On day 5, serum MT concentrations were measured before and periodically for up to 8 hours after MT administration in 4 treated dogs.

Results

Female dogs treated with MT had significant decreases in serum estradiol, testosterone, and DHEAS concentrations between days 0 and 28. Male dogs treated with MT had significant decreases in serum estradiol and 17-HP concentrations between days 0 and 28. Serum MT concentrations increased significantly after MT administration and remained high for at least 8 hours. Prolactin and thyroxine concentrations were unaffected by treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Melatonin is well absorbed following oral administration and may alter serum sex hormone concentrations. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:1111–1115)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the efficacy of long-term enalapril administration in delaying the onset of congestive heart failure (CHF).

Design—Placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter, randomized trial.

Animals—124 dogs with compensated mitral valve regurgitation (MR).

Procedures—Dogs randomly assigned to receive enalapril or placebo were monitored for the primary endpoint of onset of CHF for ≤ 58 months. Secondary endpoints included time from study entry to the combined endpoint of CHF-all-cause death; number of dogs free of CHF at 500, 1,000, and 1,500 days; and mean number of CHF-free days.

Results—Kaplan-Meier estimates of the effect of enalapril on the primary endpoint did not reveal a significant treatment benefit. Chronic enalapril administration did have a significant benefit on the combined endpoint of CHF-all-cause death (benefit was 317 days [10.6 months]). Dogs receiving enalapril remained free of CHF for a significantly longer time than those receiving placebo and were significantly more likely to be free of CHF at day 500 and at study end.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Chronic enalapril treatment of dogs with naturally occurring, moderate to severe MR significantly delayed onset of CHF, compared with placebo, on the basis of number of CHF-free days, number of dogs free of CHF at days 500 and study end, and increased time to a combined secondary endpoint of CHF-all-cause death. Improvement in the primary endpoint, CHF-free survival, was not significant. Results suggest that enalapril modestly delays the onset of CHF in dogs with moderate to severe MR.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association