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  • Author or Editor: Khursheed R. Mama x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine pharmacokinetics and selected cardiopulmonary effects of fentanyl in isoflurane-anesthetized rhesus monkeys.

Animals—6 adult male rhesus monkeys.

Procedure—Fentanyl (8 mg/kg of body weight, IV) was administered to 6 monkeys anesthetized with isoflurane. End-tidal isoflurane concentration and esophageal temperature were kept constant, and ventilation was mechanically assisted. Heart rate, rhythm, aortic blood pressure, and blood pH, gas, and fentanyl concentrations were determined before and for 8 hours after administration of fentanyl. Pharmacokinetics of fentanyl were derived by use of noncompartmental methods based on statistical moment theory.

Results—Heart rate and mean arterial pressure decreased transiently following fentanyl administration. Maximal decreases were observed 5 to 15 minutes after administration. Arterial pH, PaCO2, and PaO2 ranged from 7.46 ± 0.04 to 7.51 ± 0.05 units, 29.2 ± 3 to 34.6 ± 4.4 mm Hg, and 412.6 ± 105.3 to 482.9 ± 71.2 mm Hg, respectively. The clearance, volume of distribution area, volume of distribution steady state, mean residence time, area under the curve, elimination rate constant, and half-life were 32.5 ± 2.48 ml/kg/min, 9.04 ± 1.91 L/kg, 7.0 ± 1.2 L/kg, 218.5 ± 35.5 min, 0.247 ± 0.019 mg/ml/min, 0.004 ± 0.001/min, and 192.0 ± 33.5 min, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Transient but potentially clinically important decreases in heart rate and mean arterial pressure were observed following fentanyl administration. Distribution and clearance data were similar to those reported for dogs and humans. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:931–934)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To measure concentrations of trazodone and its major metabolite in plasma and urine after administration to healthy horses and concurrently assess selected physiologic and behavioral effects of the drug.

ANIMALS 11 Thoroughbred horses enrolled in a fitness training program.

PROCEDURES In a pilot investigation, 4 horses received trazodone IV (n = 2) or orally (2) to select a dose for the full study; 1 horse received a vehicle control treatment IV. For the full study, trazodone was initially administered IV (1.5 mg/kg) to 6 horses and subsequently given orally (4 mg/kg), with a 5-week washout period between treatments. Blood and urine samples were collected prior to drug administration and at multiple time points up to 48 hours afterward. Samples were analyzed for trazodone and metabolite concentrations, and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined; plasma drug concentrations following IV administration best fit a 3-compartment model. Behavioral and physiologic effects were assessed.

RESULTS After IV administration, total clearance of trazodone was 6.85 ± 2.80 mL/min/kg, volume of distribution at steady state was 1.06 ± 0.07 L/kg, and elimination half-life was 8.58 ± 1.88 hours. Terminal phase half-life was 7.11 ± 1.70 hours after oral administration. Horses had signs of aggression and excitation, tremors, and ataxia at the highest IV dose (2 mg/kg) in the pilot investigation. After IV drug administration in the full study (1.5 mg/kg), horses were ataxic and had tremors; sedation was evident after oral administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Administration of trazodone to horses elicited a wide range of effects. Additional study is warranted before clinical use of trazodone in horses can be recommended.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare the effects of MK-467 and hyoscine butylbromide on detomidine hydrochloride–induced cardiorespiratory and gastrointestinal changes in horses.

ANIMALS 6 healthy adult horses.

PROCEDURES Horses received detomidine hydrochloride (20 μg/kg, IV), followed 10 minutes later by MK-467 hydrochloride (150 μg/kg; DET-MK), hyoscine butylbromide (0.2 mg/kg; DET-HYO), or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (DET-S), IV, in a Latin square design. Heart rate, respiratory rate, rectal temperature, arterial and venous blood pressures, and cardiac output were measured; blood gases and arterial plasma drug concentrations were analyzed; selected cardiopulmonary variables were calculated; and sedation and gastrointestinal borborygmi were scored at predetermined time points. Differences among treatments or within treatments over time were analyzed statistically.

RESULTS With DET-MK, detomidine-induced hypertension and bradycardia were reversed shortly after MK-467 injection. Marked tachycardia and hypertension were observed with DET-HYO. Mean heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure differed significantly among all treatments from 15 to 35 and 15 to 40 minutes after detomidine injection, respectively. Cardiac output was greater with DET-MK and DET-HYO than with DET-S 15 minutes after detomidine injection, but left ventricular workload was significantly higher with DET-HYO. Borborygmus score, reduced with all treatments, was most rapidly restored with DET-MK. Sedation scores and pharmacokinetic parameters of detomidine did not differ between DET-S and DET-MK.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE MK-467 reversed or attenuated cardiovascular and gastrointestinal effects of detomidine without notable adverse effects or alterations in detomidine-induced sedation in horses. Further research is needed to determine whether these advantages are found in clinical patients and to assess whether the drug influences analgesic effects of detomidine.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare IV doses of alfaxalone and ketamine needed to facilitate orotracheal intubation and assess effects of each treatment on selected physiologic variables in goats undergoing orthopedic surgery with isoflurane anesthesia.

ANIMALS

18 healthy adult goats.

PROCEDURES

Behavior was assessed before and after sedation with midazolam (0.1 mg/kg, IV) for IV catheter placement. Anesthesia was induced with additional midazolam (0.1 mg/kg, IV) and alfaxalone (n = 9) or ketamine (9) at 2 mg/kg, IV, over 30 seconds. An additional dose of alfaxalone or ketamine (1 mg/kg) was given IV if needed for intubation; anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and IV fluids with ketamine (0.5 to 1 mg/kg/h). Direct systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP), and mean (MAP) arterial blood pressures; heart rate; and respiratory rate were recorded before induction, immediately after intubation, and during surgery. Qualitative anesthetic induction and recovery characteristics were assessed. Variables were compared within and between groups by statistical methods.

RESULTS

No preinduction variables differed significantly between groups. Postintubation and 30-minute intraoperative SAP, DAP, and MAP were higher for the ketamine group than for the alfaxalone group; within the alfaxalone group, postintubation SAP, MAP, and respiratory rate prior to mechanical ventilation were lower than respective preinduction values. All alfaxalone-group goats were intubated after 1 dose of the induction agent; 5 of 9 ketamine-group goats required an additional (1-mg/kg) dose. Postoperative recovery was good to excellent for all animals.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Both drugs were suitable for induction of anesthesia after sedation with midazolam, but most goats required higher doses of ketamine to allow intubation. For situations in which alfaxalone administration is appropriate, the potential for decreased arterial blood pressures and respiratory rate should be considered.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To quantitate effects of dose of sevoflurane and mode of ventilation on cardiovascular and respiratory function in horses and identify changes in serum biochemical values associated with sevoflurane anesthesia.

Animals—6 healthy adult horses.

Procedure—Horses were anesthetized twice: first, to determine the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane and second, to characterize cardiopulmonary and serum biochemical responses of horses to 1.0, 1.5, and 1.75 MAC multiples of sevoflurane during controlled and spontaneous ventilation.

Results—Mean (± SEM) MAC of sevoflurane was 2.84 ± 0.16%. Cardiovascular performance during anesthesia decreased as sevoflurane dose increased; the magnitude of cardiovascular depression was more severe during mechanical ventilation, compared with spontaneous ventilation. Serum inorganic fluoride concentration increased to a peak of 50.8 ± 7.1 µmol/L at the end of anesthesia. Serum creatinine concentration and sorbitol dehydrogenase activity reached their greatest values (2.0 ± 0.8 mg/dL and 10.2 ± 1.8 U/L, respectively) at 1 hour after anesthesia and then returned to baseline by 1 day after anesthesia. Serum creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase activities reached peak values by the first (ie, creatine kinase) or second (ie, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase) day after anesthesia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Sevoflurane causes dose-related cardiopulmonary depression, and mode of ventilation further impacts the magnitude of this depression. Except for serum inorganic fluoride concentration, quantitative alterations in serum biochemical indices of liver- and muscle-cell disruption and kidney function were considered clinically unremarkable and similar to results from comparable studies of other inhalation anesthetics. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:606–614)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of a constant-rate infusion of fentanyl on minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane and to determine the interaction between fentanyl and a benzodiazepine agonist (diazepam) and antagonist (flumazenil) in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs.

Animals—8 mixed-breed adult dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane 3 times during a 6-week period. After a 30-minute equilibration period, each MAC determination was performed in triplicate, using standard techniques. Fentanyl was administered as a bolus (10 µg/kg of body weight, IV) that was followed by a constant infusion (0.3 µg/kg per min, IV) throughout the remainder of the experiment. After determining isoflurane-fentanyl MAC in triplicate, each dog received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, diazepam, or flumazenil. After 30 minutes, MAC was determined again.

Results—Fentanyl significantly decreased isoflurane MAC (corrected to a barometric pressure of 760 mm Hg) from 1.80 ± 0.21 to 0.85 ± 0.14%, a reduction of 53%. Isoflurane-fentanyl-diazepam MAC (0.48 ± 0.29%) was significantly less than isoflurane-fentanylsaline MAC (0.79 ± 0.21%). Percentage reduction in isoflurane MAC was significantly greater for fentanyldiazepam (74%), compared with fentanyl-saline (54%) or fentanyl-flumazenil (61%). Mean fentanyl concentrations for the entire experiment were increased over time and were higher in the diazepam group than the saline or flumazenil groups.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Fentanyl markedly decreased isoflurane MAC in dogs. Diazepam, but not flumazenil, further decreased isoflurane-fentanyl MAC. Our results indicate that diazepam enhances, whereas flumazenil does not affect, opioid-induced CNS depression and, possibly, analgesia in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:555–560)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of a continuous rate infusion of lidocaine on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in horses.

Animals—8 healthy adult horses.

Procedures—Horses were anesthetized via IV administration of xylazine, ketamine, and diazepam; anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen. Approximately 1 hour after induction, sevoflurane MAC determination was initiated via standard techniques. Following sevoflurane MAC determination, lidocaine was administered as a bolus (1.3 mg/kg, IV, over 15 minutes), followed by constant rate infusion at 50 μg/kg/min. Determination of MAC for the lidocaine-sevoflurane combination was started 30 minutes after lidocaine infusion was initiated. Arterial blood samples were collected after the lidocaine bolus, at 30-minute intervals, and at the end of the infusion for measurement of plasma lidocaine concentrations.

Results—IV administration of lidocaine decreased mean ± SD sevoflurane MAC from 2.42 ± 0.24% to 1.78 ± 0.38% (mean MAC reduction, 26.7 ± 12%). Plasma lidocaine concentrations were 2,589 ± 811 ng/mL at the end of the bolus; 2,065 ± 441 ng/mL, 2,243 ± 699 ng/mL, 2,168 ± 339 ng/mL, and 2,254 ± 215 ng/mL at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes of infusion, respectively; and 2,206 ± 329 ng/mL at the end of the infusion. Plasma concentrations did not differ significantly among time points.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Lidocaine could be useful for providing a more balanced anesthetic technique in horses. A detailed cardiovascular study on the effects of IV infusion of lidocaine during anesthesia with sevoflurane is required before this combination can be recommended.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare cardiovascular effects of sevoflurane alone and sevoflurane plus an IV infusion of lidocaine in horses.

Animals—8 adult horses.

Procedures—Each horse was anesthetized twice via IV administration of xylazine, diazepam, and ketamine. During 1 anesthetic episode, anesthesia was maintained by administration of sevoflurane in oxygen at 1.0 and 1.5 times the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC). During the other episode, anesthesia was maintained at the same MAC multiples via a reduced concentration of sevoflurane plus an IV infusion of lidocaine. Heart rate, arterial blood pressures, blood gas analyses, and cardiac output were measured during mechanical (controlled) ventilation at both 1.0 and 1.5 MAC for each anesthetic protocol and during spontaneous ventilation at 1 of the 2 MAC multiples.

Results—Cardiorespiratory variables did not differ significantly between anesthetic protocols. Blood pressures were highest at 1.0 MAC during spontaneous ventilation and lowest at 1.5 MAC during controlled ventilation for either anesthetic protocol. Cardiac output was significantly higher during 1.0 MAC than during 1.5 MAC for sevoflurane plus lidocaine but was not affected by anesthetic protocol or mode of ventilation. Clinically important hypotension was detected at 1.5 MAC for both anesthetic protocols.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Lidocaine infusion did not alter cardiorespiratory variables during anesthesia in horses, provided anesthetic depth was maintained constant. The IV administration of lidocaine to anesthetized nonstimulated horses should be used for reasons other than to improve cardiovascular performance. Severe hypotension can be expected in nonstimulated horses at 1.5 MAC sevoflurane, regardless of whether lidocaine is administered.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare the efficacy and adverse effects of sustained-release (SR) buprenorphine following SC administration and buprenorphine following oral transmucosal (OTM) administration in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

Animals—21 young healthy female cats.

Procedures—As part of anesthetic premedication (0 hours), 10 cats received buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg) via OTM administration with additional doses at 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 hours and 11 cats received an equivalent total dose as a single SC injection of SR buprenorphine (0.12 mg/kg). The SR product contained buprenorphine hydrochloride in a proprietary SR matrix. All other anesthetic drugs and a single postoperative dose of meloxicam were administered similarly to all cats. Behavioral and physiologic variables were recorded, and signs of pain were assessed by use of 2 pain assessment scales and von Frey filament testing in each cat prior to premedication administration (baseline), during recovery from anesthesia (RFA), and at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 hours.

Results—Heart rate increased and temperature (determined via microchip transponder thermometry) decreased from baseline values during RFA in both groups. Compared with baseline values, pain scores were increased during RFA and at the 12- and 24-hour time points in both groups; von Frey scores were higher during RFA. Behavioral and physiologic variables did not differ significantly between groups at any time point.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy, SC administration of a preoperative dose of SR buprenorphine appeared to have comparable efficacy and adverse effect profile as that of twice-daily OTM administration of buprenorphine before and after surgery.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine plasma concentrations and behavioral, antinociceptive, and physiologic effects of methadone administered via IV and oral transmucosal (OTM) routes in cats.

Animals—8 healthy adult cats.

Procedures—Methadone was administered via IV (0.3 mg/kg) and OTM (0.6 mg/kg) routes to each cat in a balanced crossover design. On the days of drug administration, jugular catheters were placed in all cats under anesthesia; a cephalic catheter was also placed in cats that received methadone IV. Baseline measurements were obtained ≥ 90 minutes after extubation, and methadone was administered via the predetermined route. Heart and respiratory rates were measured; sedation, behavior, and antinociception were evaluated, and blood samples were collected for methadone concentration analysis at predetermined intervals for 24 hours after methadone administration. Data were summarized and evaluated statistically.

Results—Plasma concentrations of methadone were detected rapidly after administration via either route. Peak concentration was detected 2 hours after OTM administration and 10 minutes after IV administration. Mean ± SD peak concentration was lower after OTM administration (81.2 ± 14.5 ng/mL) than after IV administration (112.9 ± 28.5 ng/mL). Sedation was greater and lasted longer after OTM administration. Antinociceptive effects were detected 10 minutes after administration in both groups; these persisted ≥ 2 hours after IV administration and ≥ 4 hours after OTM administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Despite lower mean peak plasma concentrations, duration of antinociceptive effects of methadone was longer after OTM administration than after IV administration. Methadone administered via either route may be useful for perioperative pain management in cats.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research