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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the effect of a circulating warm water blanket (WWB) in combination with a heated humidified breathing circuit (HHBC) heated to 45 °C on rectal temperature (RT) in dogs undergoing general anesthesia for elective ovariohysterectomies.

ANIMALS

29 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES

Dogs in the experimental group (n = 8) and dogs in the control group (21) were connected to an HHBC and a conventional rebreathing circuit, respectively. All dogs were placed on a WWB in the operating room (OR). The RT was recorded at baseline, premedication, induction, transfer to OR, every 15 minutes during maintenance of anesthesia, and extubation. Incidence of hypothermia (RT < 37 °C) at extubation was recorded. Data were analyzed using unpaired t tests, the Fisher exact test, and mixed-effect ANOVA. Statistical significance was defined as P < .05.

RESULTS

There was no difference in RT during baseline, premedication, induction, and transfer to OR. The overall RT was higher for the HHBC group during anesthesia (P = .005) and at extubation (37.7 ± 0.6 °C) compared with the control group (36.6 ± 1.0 °C; P = .006). The incidence of hypothermia at extubation was 12.5% for the HHBC group and 66.7% for the control group (P = .014).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The combination of HHBC and WWB can reduce the incidence of postanesthetic hypothermia in dogs. Use of an HHBC should be considered in veterinary patients.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare the doses of propofol required to induce general anesthesia in dogs premedicated with acepromazine maleate or trazodone hydrochloride and compare the effects of these premedicants on cardiovascular variables in dogs anesthetized for orthopedic surgery.

DESIGN Prospective, randomized study.

ANIMALS 30 systemically healthy client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES 15 dogs received acepromazine (0.01 to 0.03 mg/kg [0.005 to 0.014 mg/lb], IM) 30 minutes before anesthetic induction and 15 received trazodone (5 mg/kg [2.27 mg/lb] for patients > 10 kg or 7 mg/kg [3.18 mg/lb] for patients ≤ 10 kg, PO) 2 hours before induction. Both groups received morphine sulfate (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], IM) 30 minutes before induction. Anesthesia was induced with propofol (4 to 6 mg/kg [1.82 to 2.73 mg/lb], IV, to effect) and maintained with isoflurane or sevoflurane in oxygen. Bupivacaine (0.5 mg/kg [0.227 mg/lb]) and morphine (0.1 mg/kg [0.045 mg/lb]) were administered epidurally. Dogs underwent tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (n = 22) or tibial tuberosity advancement (8) and were monitored throughout anesthesia. Propofol induction doses and cardiovascular variables (heart rate and systemic, mean, and diastolic arterial blood pressures) were compared between groups.

RESULTS The mean dose of propofol required for anesthetic induction and all cardiovascular variables evaluated did not differ between groups. Intraoperative hypotension developed in 6 and 5 dogs of the acepromazine and trazodone groups, respectively; bradycardia requiring intervention developed in 3 dogs/group. One dog that received trazodone had priapism 24 hours later and was treated successfully. No other adverse effects were reported.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE At the described dosages, cardiovascular effects of trazodone were similar to those of acepromazine in healthy dogs undergoing anesthesia for orthopedic surgery.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To summarize the anesthetic events of snakes seen at a large university hospital, identify challenges with record keeping, and assess patient and anesthesia-related morbidity and death.

SAMPLE

139 anesthetic events were performed; only 106 cases had detailed anesthetic reports available for further analyses.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of snakes that underwent general anesthesia between October 2000 and January 2022 were retrospectively reviewed. Only cases with complete anesthesia records were used to assess anesthetic parameters. Collected data included general patient details, diagnoses, procedures, premedication, induction, maintenance, monitoring, and recovery.

RESULTS

A thorough review of the records identified issues or scenarios that resulted in poor record management as well as highlighted the most frequently used anesthetics in snakes. For premedication this was alfaxalone, butorphanol, and hydromorphone, whereas isoflurane, alfaxalone, or propofol were the most common with induction. Lastly, with maintenance, isoflurane was the most popular choice. Of the 139 cases performed, 127 animals recovered, 8 were euthanatized due to poor prognosis, and 4 failed to recover. All snakes that failed to recover had preexisting disease identified pre-, peri-, or postoperatively at necropsy.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

General anesthesia can be reliably and safely undertaken in snakes without severe preexisting disease. Efforts should be directed at identifying preexisting disease and maintaining and completing anesthesia records, and we recommend an auditing system to identify and correct issues as they arise.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the outcomes of doublelayer inverting anastomosis (DIA), single-layer anastomosis (SLA), and single-layer anastomosis combined with a hyaluronate membrane (SLA+HA-membrane) with respect to stomal diameter, adhesion formation, surgery time, and anastomotic healing in horses.

Animals—18 adult horses.

Procedure—Midline celiotomy and end-to-end anastomoses were performed. In control horses (n = 6), DIA was performed; in treated horses, SLA was performed (6) or SLA+HA-membrane was performed (6). Horses were euthanatized 21 days after surgery. Abdominal adhesions were evaluated grossly and histologically. Stomal diameters were measured ultrasonographically and compared with adjacent luminal diameters. Anastomotic healing was evaluated histologically for fibrosis and inflammation, tissue alignment, and inversion. Surgery times were recorded for the anastomotic procedure and compared among groups.

Results—There were significantly more adhesions in the SLA group, compared with the DIA and SLA+HAmembrane groups. Reduction in stomal diameters in the DIA group was significantly greater than the SLA and SLA+HA-membrane groups. Surgery times for the DIA group were significantly greater than the SLA and SLA+HA-membrane groups. Histologic findings of fibrosis, inflammation, and mucosal healing were similar among groups. There was significant tissue inversion in the DIA group, compared with the 2 treatment groups. Tissue alignment was not different among groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of a SLA+HA-membrane was an effective small intestinal anastomotic technique. This technique was faster to perform and resulted in a larger stomal diameter, compared with the DIA technique and significantly fewer perianastomotic adhesions, compared with the SLA technique. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1314–1319)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the minimum alveolar concentration that blunts adrenergic responses (MACBAR) for isoflurane and evaluate effects of fentanyl on isoflurane MACBAR in sheep.

ANIMALS 13 healthy adult Dorset-cross adult ewes.

PROCEDURES In a crossover design, each ewe was anesthetized 2 times for determination of isoflurane MACBAR. Anesthesia was induced with propofol administered IV. Sheep initially received fentanyl (5 μg/kg, IV, followed by a constant rate infusion of 5 μg/kg/h) or an equivalent volume of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control treatment). After a washout period of at least 8 days, the other treatment was administered. For MACBAR determination, a mechanical nociceptive stimulus (ie, sponge forceps) was applied at the coronary band for 1 minute. The MACBAR values of the 2 treatments were compared by means of a paired t test. During MACBAR determination, blood samples were collected for measurement of plasma fentanyl concentration.

RESULTS Mean ± SD isoflurane MACBAR of the fentanyl and control treatments was 1.70 ± 0.28% and 1.79 ± 0.35%, respectively; no significant difference was found between the 2 treatments. Plasma concentration of fentanyl reached a median steady-state concentration of 1.69 ng/mL (interquartile range [25th to 75th percentile], 1.47 to 1.79 ng/mL), which was maintained throughout the study.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Administration of fentanyl at 5 μg/kg, IV, followed by a constant rate infusion of the drug at 5 μg/kg/h did not decrease isoflurane MACBAR. Further studies to determine the effect of higher doses of fentanyl on inhalation anesthetic agents and their potential adverse effects are warranted. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:119–126)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To determine whether dogs had prostatic disease, urinary incontinence, or urinary tract infection 1 year after partial prostatectomy to treat prostatic abscesses and cysts.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

20 male dogs with prostatic abscesses or cysts. Fifteen dogs had evidence of urinary tract infection. Only 8 dogs urinated normally; the remainder dribbled, had obstructions, or required medical treatment.

Procedure

Partial prostatectomy was performed on each dog. Sexually Intact dogs (n = 12) also were castrated.

Results

None of the dogs had return of prostatic cystic enlargement or clinical signs of prostatic disease during the first year after surgery. Two dogs were euthanatized within 1 year after surgery, with 1 dog having prostatic enlargement and adenocarcinoma and 1 dog having unrelated lymphosarcoma. Fifteen dogs were continent. The remaining 5 dogs urinated normally but had intermittent and minor incontinence. Eleven dogs had no signs of infection 1 year after surgery, 5 had pyuria or positive urine bacteriologic culture results, 2 did not have urinalysis performed, and 2 were euthanatized.

Clinical Implications

Dogs with severe prostatic abscesses or cysts and infections can be successfully treated by partial prostatectomy with an ultrasonic surgical aspirator and castration, resulting in long-term disease resolution. Although most dogs with severe prostatic disease do not urinate normally before surgery, nearly all dogs resume normal micturition after partial prostatectomy. Postoperative results of partial prostatectomy appear to be better than those of previous drainage techniques for treatment of prostatic cavitary disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:868–871)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare analgesic and gastrointestinal effects of lidocaine and buprenorphine administered to rabbits undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

ANIMALS Fourteen 12-month-old female New Zealand White rabbits.

PROCEDURES Rabbits were assigned to 2 treatment groups (7 rabbits/group). One group received buprenorphine (0.06 mg/kg, IV, q 8 h for 2 days), and the other received lidocaine (continuous rate infusion [CRI] at 100 μg/kg/min for 2 days). Variables, including food and water consumption, fecal output, glucose and cortisol concentrations, and behaviors while in exercise pens, were recorded.

RESULTS Rabbits receiving a lidocaine CRI had significantly higher gastrointestinal motility, food intake, and fecal output and significantly lower glucose concentrations, compared with results for rabbits receiving buprenorphine. Rabbits receiving lidocaine also had a higher number of normal behaviors (eg, sprawling, traveling, and frolicking) after surgery, compared with behaviors such as crouching and sitting that were seen more commonly in rabbits receiving buprenorphine. Both groups had significant weight loss after surgery. Pain scores did not differ significantly between treatment groups. Significant decreases in heart rate and respiratory rate were observed on the day of surgery, compared with values before and after surgery. Rabbits in the lidocaine group had significantly overall lower heart rates than did rabbits in the buprenorphine group.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A CRI of lidocaine to rabbits provided better postoperative outcomes with respect to fecal output, food intake, and glucose concentrations. Thus, lidocaine appeared to be a suitable alternative to buprenorphine for alleviating postoperative pain with minimal risk of anorexia and gastrointestinal ileus.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research