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  • Author or Editor: Dudley L. McCaw x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate safety and efficacy of LDI-100, a preparation containing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), in the treatment of dogs with mast cell tumors and to compare results with those from a control group receiving single-agent vinblastine.

Animals—95 dogs with measurable grade II or III mast cell tumors.

Procedures—Dogs were randomized to receive either LDI-100 (1.35 ng of BCG and 2 units of hCG, SC, q 24 h) or vinblastine (2 mg/m2, IV, q 1 wk) for 6 weeks. Tumors were measured at baseline and day 42, and dogs were monitored for signs of toxicosis. Clinical performance scores were recorded at each visit. Differences in host factors (sex, weight, and age), clinical performance score, tumor response, and adverse events were analyzed.

Results—46 dogs received LDI-100, and 49 dogs received vinblastine. No significant differences were found between the 2 treatment groups with regard to host factors or clinical performance score. Tumor response (≥50% reduction) rates were similar between the LDI-100 and vinblastine group (28.6% and 11.7%, respectively). Dogs in the LDI-100 group had significantly less neutropenia than the vinblastine group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—hCG and BCG have immunomodulatory and antitumor effects against a variety of malignancies in humans and dogs. In this study, LDI-100 provided clinical responses comparable to single-agent vinblastine chemotherapy but without myelosuppression. LDI-100 is a promising new agent that should be further investigated for multimodality therapy of mast cell tumors in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To characterize the frequency, clinical signs, biologic behavior, and response to treatment of tumors of the ear canal in dogs and cats.

Design

Retrospective analysis of medical records.

Animals

Medical records of 81 dogs (48 malignant tumors, 33 benign tumors) and 64 cats (56 malignant tumors, 8 benign tumors).

Procedure

Data were analyzed for cats and dogs with malignant tumors, and risk factors were analyzed for their potential impact on survival time.

Results

Malignant tumor types most commonly reported included ceruminous gland adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and carcinoma of undetermined origin. Median survival time of dogs with malignant aural tumors was > 58 months, whereas that of cats was 11.7 months. A poor prognosis was indicated by extensive tumor involvement (dogs) and by neurologic signs at time of diagnosis, diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma or carcinoma of undetermined origin, and invasion into lymphatics or blood vessels (cats).

Clinical Implications

Malignant tumors of the ear canal in dogs and cats have a propensity for local invasion, but tend not to metastasize. Squamous cell carcinoma and carcinoma of undetermined origin were the most locally aggressive tumors. Malignant tumors of the ear canal are best managed by aggressive surgical excision. Radiotherapy may be useful when tumors cannot be completely removed. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;208:1413-1418)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Long-term follow-up information pertaining to 162 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated by amputation alone was collected from 17 veterinary institutions. The majority (72.5%) of dogs died or were euthanatized because of problems documented to be related to metastases. The first clinically apparent sites of metastasis were the lungs (60.8% of total), the skeleton (5.2%), or both (4.6%). A Kaplan-Meier survivorship distribution was plotted on the basis of available survival time data in all 162 dogs. The mean and median survival times were estimated to be 19.8 and 19.2 weeks, respectively, and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were estimated to be 11.5 and 2.0% respectively.

Statistically significant relationships were not found between survival time and reporting institution, gender, site of primary tumor, whether the primary tumor was proximally or distally located, whether the primary tumor was located in the forelimb or hind limb, whether presurgical biopsy was performed, and whether death was tumor related. A significant (P < 0.01) quadratic relationship was found between age and survival time. Survival time was longest in dogs 7 to 10 years old and was shorter in older and younger dogs.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association