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  • Author or Editor: Dorothee Bienzle x
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Abstract

Objective—To compare CBC results obtained by use of an in-house centrifugal analyzer with results of a reference method.

Design—Prospective study.

Sample Population—Blood samples from 147 dogs, 42 cats, and 60 horses admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital and from 24 cows in a commercial dairy herd.

Procedure—Results obtained with the centrifugal analyzer were compared with results obtained with an electrical-impedance light-scatter hematology analyzer and manual differential cell counting (reference method).

Results—The centrifugal analyzer yielded error messages for 50 of 273 (18%) samples. Error messages were most common for samples with values outside established reference ranges. Correlation coefficients ranged from 0.80 to 0.99 for Hct, 0.55 to 0.90 for platelet count, 0.76 to 0.95 for total WBC count, and 0.63 (cattle) to 0.82 (cats) to 0.95 (dogs and horses) for granulocyte count. Coefficients for mononuclear cell (combined lymphocyte and monocyte) counts were 0.56, 0.65, 0.68, and 0.92 for cats, horses, dogs, and cattle, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that there was an excellent correlation between results of the centrifugal analyzer and results of the reference method only for Hct in feline, canine, and equine samples; WBC count in canine and equine samples; granulocyte count in canine and equine samples; and reticulocyte count in canine samples. However, an inability to identify abnormal cells, the high percentage of error messages, particularly for samples with abnormal WBC counts, and the wide confidence intervals precluded reliance on differential cell counts obtained with the centrifugal analyzer. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1195–1200)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the performance of a chemiluminescent endotoxin activity assay in horses with colic and healthy horses.

Animals—20 horses with colic and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS group), 8 horses with colic with no SIRS (NSIRS group), and 20 healthy horses.

Procedures—Venous blood was collected into EDTA blood collection tubes after completion of a physical examination, and a chemiluminescent endotoxin activity assay was performed within 60 minutes of collection. Medical or surgical interventions and outcome were recorded for each horse.

Results—Mean ± SE endotoxin activity was 0.16 ± 0.05 for healthy horses, 0.18 ± 0.07 for the NSIRS group, and 0.53 ± 0.05 for the SIRS group and was significantly different among the groups. Mean endotoxin activity was significantly higher in the SIRS group than in the NSIRS group and the healthy group. No significant difference between the healthy and NSIRS groups was present. The higher the measured endotoxin activity, the more likely it was for horses to be euthanized.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The chemiluminescent endotoxin assay was easy to use, required a short time to perform, could be completed at the patient's side, and with some modifications, may be a useful component in the clinical assessment and prognostication of horses with colic.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate experimental induction of recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) with inhaled fungal spores, lipopolysaccharide, and silica microspheres in horses.

Animals—7 horses with and 3 horses without a history of RAO.

Procedures—RAO-susceptible horses ranged in age from 17 to approximately 30 years, and control horses ranged in age from 7 to approximately 15 years. Pure mold cultures were derived from repeated culture of hay and identified via gene amplification and sequencing. Pulmonary function testing and bronchoalveolar lavage were performed before and after nebulization with a suspension of spores derived from 3 fungi, lipopolysaccharide, and 1-μm silica microspheres in all horses. This was followed by a 4-month washout period and a further pulmonary function test followed by saline (0.9% NaCl) solution challenge and bronchoalveolar lavage.

ResultsLichtheimia corymbifera, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Eurotium amstelodami were consistently identified in cultures of moldy hay. Nebulization with fungal spores, lipopolysaccharide, and microspheres induced significant increases in pleural pressure in RAO-susceptible but not control horses. Airway neutrophilia developed in both groups of horses with exposure to challenge material but more severely in RAO-susceptible horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that inhalation of fungal spores in combination with lipopolysaccharide and silica microspheres can induce disease exacerbation in susceptible horses and may thus be a useful model for future standardized studies of RAO in horses.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether canine protein C (CnPC) had antichemotactic effects on canine neutrophils, whether endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) was expressed on canine neutrophils, and the role of EPCR in neutrophil chemotaxis.

SAMPLE Neutrophils isolated from blood samples from healthy dogs (n = 6) and sick dogs with (2) or without (3) an inflammatory leukogram.

PROCEDURES Neutrophils were analyzed by reverse transcriptase PCR assay and flow cytometry for detection of EPCR mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Neutrophils were incubated with CnPC zymogen or canine activated protein C (CnAPC), with or without RCR-379 (an anti–human EPCR antibody). Neutrophils were then allowed to migrate through a filter membrane toward a chemokine. Untreated neutrophils served as positive control samples. Migration was quantified by fluorescence measurement, and chemotaxis index (Chx) values (fluorescence of test sample/fluorescence of positive control sample) were computed.

RESULTS The cDNA for EPCR was amplified, and EPCR expression was detected on neutrophil surfaces. Obtained Chx values were significantly higher in cells treated with RCR-379 than in cells treated with CnPC or CnAPC alone. The Chx values for neutrophils treated with RCR-379 were not significantly different from 1, whereas those for neutrophils treated without RCR-379 were significantly less than 1. The effects of RCR-379 on neutrophil migration were independent of concentration or activation status of protein C.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Canine neutrophils expressed EPCR, and inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis by CnPC and CnAPC depended on EPCR. Interventions with EPCR signaling may have therapeutic application in dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) accomplished by use of a bronchoscopic (B-BAL) and a nonbronchoscopic (NB-BAL) technique in healthy cats.

ANIMALS 12 healthy cats.

PROCEDURES Two BALs were performed in a randomized order 2 weeks apart in each cat. Cats were anesthetized, and a 2.9-mm fiberoptic bronchoscope (B-BAL) or 8F red rubber catheter (NB-BAL) was wedged in a bronchus. Two 5-mL aliquots of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution were infused into the left and right caudal lung fields and aspirated manually with a 20-mL syringe. Proportion of BAL fluid (BALF) retrieved, depth of wedging, and anesthetic complications were recorded. Total nucleated cell count, differential cell count, and semiquantitative scores of cytologic slide quality were determined for all BALF samples. Results were compared with ANOVAs and Wilcoxon signed rank tests.

RESULTS Proportion of retrieved BALF and depth of wedging were significantly greater for B-BAL than NB-BAL. Differential cell counts and cytologic slide quality did not differ significantly between techniques. Complications included transient hemoglobin desaturation (24/24 [100%] BALs) and prolonged anesthetic recovery time (4/24 [17%] BALs). Anesthetic recovery scores did not differ significantly between techniques.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that NB-BAL was noninferior to B-BAL with regard to ease of performance, anesthetic variables, and cytologic slide quality for cats without clinical respiratory tract disease.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid obtained by manual aspiration (MA) with a handheld syringe with that obtained by suction pump aspiration (SPA) in healthy dogs.

Animals—13 adult Beagles.

Procedures—Each dog was anesthetized and bronchoscopic BAL was performed. The MA technique was accomplished with a 35-mL syringe attached to the bronchoscope biopsy channel. The SPA technique was achieved with negative pressure (5 kPa) applied to the bronchoscope suction valve with a disposable suction trap. Both aspiration techniques were performed in each dog in randomized order on opposite caudal lung lobes. Two 1 mL/kg aliquots of warm saline (0.9% NaCl) solution were infused per site. For each BAL fluid sample, the percentage of retrieved fluid was calculated, the total nucleated cell count (TNCC) and differential cell count were determined, and semiquantitative assessment of slide quality was performed. Comparisons were made between MA and SPA techniques for each outcome.

Results—1 dog was removed from the study because of illness. The mean percentage of fluid retrieved (mean difference, 23%) and median TNCC (median distribution of differences, 100 cells/μL) for samples obtained by SPA were significantly greater than those for samples obtained by MA.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In healthy dogs, BAL by SPA resulted in a significantly higher percentage of fluid retrieval and samples with a higher TNCC than did MA. Further evaluation of aspiration techniques in dogs with respiratory tract disease is required to assess whether SPA improves the diagnostic yield of BAL samples.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 1.5-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat was admitted for hind limb locomotor difficulties and signs of pain along the lumbar portion of the vertebral column. At the time of referral, the cat was paraparetic with deficits in the spinal reflexes of the hind limbs. Neuroanatomic localization was at the L6-S2 spinal cord segments, corresponding approximately to the region of the L4-L6 vertebral bodies.

Clinical Findings—Radiography revealed a mixed osteolytic-proliferative lesion within the body of L5 involving the cranial end plate, as well as punctate radiolucencies in the distal portion of the femur. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intramedullary spinal cord lesion along with extensive meningeal and nerve root lesions in the area of the L4-L6 vertebral bodies. Cytologic analysis of a bone marrow aspirate from the right trochanteric fossa revealed a substantial plasma cell infiltrate. Analysis of CSF revealed a high protein concentration and morphologically abnormal plasma cells. Urine, but not serum, protein electrophoresis revealed a sharp γ-globulin peak consistent with a monoclonal band of Bence-Jones proteins. The diagnosis was multiple myeloma.

Treatment and Outcome—The cat was treated with melphalan and prednisolone. A rapid clinical response was reported, and by week 3 after diagnosis, the cat's locomotion and behavior had normalized. However, by month 4, multifocal neurologic deficits were evident. The cat was euthanized at 9 months because of tetraparesis and substantial weight loss.

Clinical Relevance—To our knowledge, this is the first report of myeloma in a cat that had electrophoretically detectable light chain proteinuria but lacked a detectable serum monoclonal gammopathy.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the diagnostic quality of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid acquired from healthy dogs by manual aspiration via polyethylene tubing (MAPT) and via suction pump aspiration (SPA) with a suction trap connection.

Animals—12 healthy adult Beagles.

Procedures—BAL was performed with bronchoscopic guidance in anesthetized dogs. The MAPT was performed with a 35-mL syringe attached to polyethylene tubing wedged in a bronchus via the bronchoscope's biopsy channel. The SPA was performed with 5 kPa of negative pressure applied to the bronchoscope's suction valve via a suction trap. The MAPT and SPA techniques were performed in randomized order on opposite caudal lung lobes of each dog. Two 1 mL/kg lavages were performed per site. Samples of BAL fluid were analyzed on the basis of a semiquantitative quality scale, percentage of retrieved fluid, and total nucleated and differential cell counts. Results were compared with Wilcoxon signed rank tests.

Results—Percentage of BAL fluid retrieved (median difference, 16.2%), surfactant score (median difference, 1), and neutrophil count (median difference, 74 cells/μL) were significantly higher for SPA than for MAPT. A higher BAL fluid epithelial cell score was obtained via MAPT, compared with that for samples obtained via SPA (median difference, 1).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that in healthy dogs, SPA provided a higher percentage of BAL fluid retrieval than did MAPT. The SPA technique may improve the rate of diagnostic success for BAL in dogs, compared with that for MAPT. Further evaluation of these aspiration techniques in dogs with respiratory tract disease is required.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research