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Abstract

Objective—To investigate penciclovir pharmacokinetics following single and multiple oral administrations of famciclovir to cats.

Animals—8 adult cats.

Procedures—A balanced crossover design was used. Phase I consisted of a single administration (62.5 mg, PO) of famciclovir. Phase II consisted of multiple doses of famciclovir (62.5 mg, PO) given every 8 or 12 hours for 3 days. Plasma penciclovir concentrations were assayed via liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry at fixed time points after famciclovir administration.

Results—Following a single dose of famciclovir, the dose-normalized (15 mg/kg) maximum concentration (Cmax) of penciclovir (350 ± 180 ng/mL) occurred at 4.6 ± 1.8 hours and mean ± SD apparent elimination half-life was 3.1 ± 0.9 hours. However, the dose-normalized area under the plasma penciclovir concentration-time curve extrapolated to infinity (AUC0→∞) during phase I decreased with increasing dose, suggesting either nonlinear pharmacokinetics or interindividual variability among cats. Accumulation occurred following multiple doses of famciclovir administered every 8 hours as indicated by a significantly increased dose-normalized AUC, compared with AUC0→∞ from phase 1. Dose-normalized penciclovir Cmaxfollowing administration of famciclovir every 12 or 8 hours (290 ± 150 ng/mL or 780 ± 250 ng/mL, respectively) was notably less than the in vitro concentration (3,500 ng/mL) required for activity against feline herpesvirus-1.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Penciclovir pharmacokinetics following oral famciclovir administration in cats appeared complex within the dosage range studied. Famciclovir dosages of 15 mg/kg administered every 8 hours to cats are unlikely to result in plasma penciclovir concentrations with activity against feline herpesvirus-1.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine how frequently Malassezia spp were identified on the periocular skin of dogs and assess the respective associations between the presence of Malassezia spp on the periocular skin and blepharitis, ocular discharge, and the application of ophthalmic medications.

Design—Prospective clinical study.

Animals—167 eyelids of 84 dogs.

Procedures—Samples obtained from the surface of the eyelid skin by use of adhesive tape were evaluated cytologically for the presence of Malassezia spp. Dogs were grouped on the basis of the presence of blepharitis, nature of ocular discharge, and whether ophthalmic medications were applied, and the proportion of samples with Malassezia spp was compared among the groups.

ResultsMalassezia spp were detected in 19 samples, of which 15 were obtained from eyes without blepharitis and 14 were obtained from eyes treated with topical ophthalmic medications. The proportion of samples with Malassezia spp was significantly higher for eyes with ocular discharge than for eyes without ocular discharge, especially if that discharge was mucoid or mucopurulent, and for eyes that were treated with aqueous-based medications only or a combination of oil- and aqueous-based medications than for eyes that were not treated.

Conclusions and Clinical RelevanceMalassezia organisms were detected on the periocular skin of 3 of 56 (5%) clinically normal dogs. Malassezia organisms were also frequently found on the periocular skin of dogs that had mucoid or mucopurulent ocular discharge or that were administered topical aqueous-based ophthalmic medications, and the periocular skin of these dogs should be cytologically evaluated for Malassezia organisms. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2014;244:1304–1308)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of topical application of undiluted heterologous serum on time to corneal reepithelialization in dogs with superficial chronic corneal epithelial defects (SCCEDs).

DESIGN Multicenter, randomized, double-masked, controlled clinical trial.

ANIMALS 41 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES After collection of baseline clinical and historical data, dogs were randomly assigned to receive topically applied undiluted heterologous serum (n = 22) or isotonic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (19) along with tobramycin and atropine. Epithelial debridement (at all visits) and grid keratotomy (at visits 2, 3, and 4) of SCCEDs were performed. Ophthalmic examination including fluorescein application was performed once weekly for 4 weeks or until corneal reepithelialization. Clinicians and owners were masked to treatment group.

RESULTS No differences in baseline data were detected between treatment groups. No difficulties with medication administration, noncompliance, or adverse reactions were noted. All SCCEDs in both groups healed by 4 weeks after treatment began. Median time to reepithelialization (2 weeks) was not significantly different between serum-treated and placebo-treated eyes. Irrespective of treatment group, median time to reepithelialization was not significantly different for Boxers versus non-Boxer breeds. Direct correlations were detected between time to reepithelialization and vascularization score at study entry, vascularization score at time of reepithelialization, and ulcer area at study entry in both groups. Time to reepithelialization was not correlated with age, sex, or duration of signs in either group.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Topical application of undiluted heterologous serum was well tolerated by dogs with SCCEDs but, as an adjunct to standard treatment, did not reduce time to corneal reepithelialization.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize clinical ocular disease, viral shedding, and serologic response associated with primary canine herpesvirus-1 (CHV-1) ocular infection in naïve adult dogs.

Animals—12 specific pathogen-free adult Beagles.

Procedures—Dogs were topically inoculated in the right eye with CHV-1 (infection group; n = 8) or virus-free medium (control group; 4). Dogs were inoculated with or without corneal microtrephination and subconjunctivally administered corticosteroids. Conjunctiva, buffy coat, and serum samples for real-time PCR assay, virus isolation, and serum neutralization (SN) antibody titers were collected until postinfection day (PID) 224, and general physical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed.

Results—Dogs in the infection group developed bilateral, mild to moderate conjunctivitis that reached maximal intensity on PIDs 7 to 10. Ocular viral shedding was detected in all dogs in the infection group between PIDs 3 and 10. Infected dogs developed CHV-1 SN antibody titers, beginning at PID 7 and peaking on PID 21. All buffy coat PCR assay results were negative. Corneal microtrephination and subconjunctival corticosteroid administration did not significantly affect clinical disease or viral shedding. Following recovery from primary infection, dogs remained clinically normal, did not shed virus, and had slowly decreasing SN antibody titers. Dogs in the control group did not develop conjunctivitis, shed virus, or develop CHV-1 SN antibody titers.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Primary ocular infection of adult dogs with CHV-1 was associated with self-limiting conjunctivitis and ocular viral shedding, which was evident in the absence of clinically detectable keratitis or systemic disease. Features of this infection resembled herpes simplex virus primary ocular infection in humans.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—2 dogs (dogs 1 and 2) were examined for sudden onset of blindness. Both dogs had mild obtundation and mydriasis in both eyes. It was thought that dog 1 may have ingested ivermectin; dog 2 had been treated with ivermectin for demodectic mange.

Clinical Findings—On initial examination, both dogs had mydriasis and decreased pupillary light reflexes in both eyes. Dog 1 had an absent menace response bilaterally. Fundic examination of both eyes in both dogs revealed regions of multifocal retinal edema and folds with low-lying retinal separation. The electroretinogram was extinguished in dog 1 and attenuated in dog 2. Ivermectin was detected in serum samples from both dogs.

Treatment and Outcome—Both dogs made a complete clinical recovery following cessation of exposure to ivermectin; electroretinographic findings improved, and retinal edema resolved with some residual chorioretinal scarring.

Clinical Relevance—To our knowledge, this is the first report of resolution of retinal edema and electroretinographic changes associated with ivermectin toxicosis in dogs. In dogs that develop blindness suddenly, fundic examination, electroretinography, and assessment of serum ivermectin concentration are diagnostically useful, even if exposure to ivermectin is unknown.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—2 horses were examined because of vascular masses involving the lower eyelid.

Clinical Findings—Both horses had a unilateral, fluctuant mass involving the lower eyelid. For horse 1, the mass had been present since birth and had slowly increased in size over time. The mass also changed in size in response to various environmental stimuli, alterations in the position of the horse's head, and digital obstruction of superficial vessels adjacent to the mass. Horse 2 was brought to the hospital for euthanasia, and no historical or antemor-tem data were available. A combination of contrast angiography, Doppler ultrasonography, surgical exploration, and blood gas analysis (horse 1) and postmortem and histologic examination (horse 2) were used to determine that the masses consisted of non-neoplastic distended venous channels with anastomoses to the inferior lateral palpebral and angularis oculi veins (both horses) as well as the facial vein (horse 2). Histologic examination (horse 2) revealed large, endothelial cell-lined, blood-filled spaces within the deep dermis consistent with a distensible superficial venous orbital malformation.

Treatment and Outcome—Horse 1 underwent surgical exploration and ligation of the vascular malformation. Six months after surgery, the mass was markedly reduced in size, and size of the mass was static regardless of head position or environmental stimuli.

Clinical Relevance—Thorough preoperative planning with Doppler ultrasonography, contrast angiography, and blood gas analysis is recommended when attempting surgical correction of these malformations in horses. Surgical ligation can result in a successful cosmetic and functional outcome.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare client perception of outcome of phacoemulsification in dogs with information obtained from medical records.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—108 dogs (203 eyes) undergoing phacoemulsification from May 1999 through April 2004.

Procedure—Data obtained from medical records included signalment, presence of diabetes mellitus, cataract stage, whether surgery was unilateral or bilateral, intraocular lens (IOL) placement, and postoperative complications. Owners completed a survey concerning outcome of phacoemulsification in their dog. Survey responses from owners classified as satisfied or dissatisfied with the outcome of phacoemulsification on the basis of their willingness, in retrospect, to have the surgery performed again were compared.

Results—Data from medical records and survey responses were available for 108 dogs (203 eyes). Median follow-up was 3 months via medical record review and 12 months via owner survey responses. Most (81%) owners were satisfied with outcome. The most common reason for dissatisfaction was loss of vision after surgery; however, most dissatisfied owners did not return their dog for examinations. Owner perception of success was not associated with patient age, sex, presence of diabetes mellitus, cataract stage, or IOL placement in at least 1 eye but was associated with perceived improvement of their pet's vision and activity level. Dissatisfied owners were significantly more likely to report that explanation of risks and complications before surgery was inadequate.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Owner perception of outcome after phacoemulsification in dogs was highly favorable. However, surgical risks and the importance of postoperative examinations, particularly in dogs undergoing visual deterioration, must be conveyed to clients.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare aesthesiometer-determined corneal sensitivity between diabetic and nondiabetic dogs and to investigate the correlation between corneal sensitivity and duration of diabetes or status of glycemic control, as estimated by use of glycated blood protein concentrations.

Animals—23 diabetic and 29 nondiabetic normoglycemic dogs.

Procedure—A Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometer was used to measure corneal touch threshold (CTT) in 5 corneal regions of each dog. At the time of ocular examination, duration of diabetes mellitus was estimated from the history, and blood was drawn for assessment of blood glycosylated hemoglobin and serum fructosamine concentrations.

Results—Median CTT for central, nasal, dorsal, temporal, and ventral corneal regions in nondiabetic dogs (1.6, 2.3, 2.8, 2.8, and 5.1 g/mm2, respectively) was significantly lower than in diabetic dogs (2.8, 4.0, 5.1, 5.1, and 6.6 g/mm2, respectively). Median regional CTT in diabetic dogs was not significantly correlated with estimated duration of diabetes mellitus or blood glycated protein concentrations. No significant difference was found in regional CTT between eyes of normoglycemic dogs with unilateral cataracts.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Diabetic dogs have significantly reduced corneal sensitivity in all regions, compared with nondiabetic normoglycemic dogs. Regional variation in corneal sensitivity is similar in diabetic and normoglycemic dogs. Neither glycemic control nor duration of diabetes, as estimated, is significantly correlated with corneal hyposensitivity. Corneal nerve dysfunction may be associated with recurrent or nonhealing ulcers in diabetic dogs for which no other underlying cause can be found. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:7–11)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate orally administered famciclovir for treatment of cats with experimentally induced disease attributable to feline herpesvirus type-1 (FHV-1).

Animals—16 nonvaccinated specific-pathogen-free cats.

Procedures—Cats were treated orally with famciclovir (90 mg/kg; n = 10) or a similar volume of lactose (400 mg; 6) 3 times/d for 21 days. Cats were inoculated with FHV-1 and administered the first treatment dose on day 0. Disease score; weight; results of urinalysis, serum biochemical analysis, and CBC; histologic conjunctivitis score; herpetic DNA shedding; goblet cell density; anti-FHV-1 antibody concentration; and plasma penciclovir concentration were measured.

Results—On days 4 to 18 following inoculation, disease scores were lower in famciclovir-treated cats than in lactose-treated cats. Lactose-treated cats decreased in weight during the first 7 days after inoculation, but famciclovir-treated cats increased in weight throughout the study. Percentage change in weight was greater in famciclovir-treated cats on days 7 and 14 than in lactose-treated cats. Serum globulin concentration was lower on days 3 through 9, conjunctivitis histologic score was lower on day 14, herpetic DNA was shed less frequently throughout the study, goblet cell density was greater on day 21, and circulating anti-FHV-1 antibody concentration at study end was lower in famciclovir-treated cats, compared with these measurements in lactose-treated cats. Approximate peak plasma penciclovir concentration was 2.0 μg/mL.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Famciclovir administration improved outcomes for systemic, ophthalmic, clinicopathologic, virologic, and histologic variables in cats experimentally infected with FHV-1. Adjunctive topical mucinomimetic and antimicrobial treatments may also be necessary.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) on tear film breakup time (TFBUT) and Schirmer tear test (STT) values in cats with primary experimental infection and to determine the relationship betweenTFBUT and STT values and conjunctival goblet cell density (GCD).

Sample Population—9 specific-pathogen–free cats of approximately 6 months of age.

Procedures—6 cats were inoculated with FHV-1; 3 control cats were sham inoculated. Clinical and histologic evidence of conjunctivitis and TFBUT, GCD, and STT values were assessed at multiple times until postinoculation day (PID) 29.

Results—In infected cats, mean clinical and histologic conjunctivitis scores peaked at PID 7 and remained above baseline at PID 29. In control cats, these 2 variables did not change from baseline throughout the study. MeanTFBUT declined rapidly in infected cats up to PID 15 and at PID 29 remained less than baseline, less than for control cats, and below refer-ence range values. Mean STT value for infected cats at PID 29 was increased from baseline but was within the reference range and not different from the value for control cats. Mean GCD in infected cats declined precipitously by PID 7 and remained below reference range values at PID 29. Mean GCD in control cats remained unchanged for the duration of the study period.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—FHV-1 induced qualitative tear film abnormalities in experimentally infected cats, as measured by TFBUT and GCD. Assessment of TFBUT provided a reasonable clinical estimate of GCD.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research