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Abstract

Objective—To determine ocular tissue drug concentrations after topical ocular administration of 0.3% ciprofloxacin and 0.5% moxifloxacin in ophthalmologically normal horses.

Animals—24 ophthalmologically normal adult horses.

Procedures—0.3% ciprofloxacin and 0.5% moxifloxacin solutions (0.1 mL) were applied to the ventral conjunctival fornix of 1 eye in each horse as follows: group 1 (n = 8) at 0, 2, 4, and 6 hours; group 2 (8) at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 10 hours; and group 3 (8) at 0, 2, 4, 6, 10, and 14 hours. Tears, cornea, and aqueous humor (AH) were collected at 8, 14, and 18 hours for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Drug concentrations were determined via high-performance liquid chromatography.

Results—Median (25th to 75th percentile) concentrations of ciprofloxacin for groups 1, 2, and 3 in tears (μg/mL) were 53.7 (25.5 to 88.8), 48.5 (19.7 to 74.7), and 24.4 (15.4 to 67.1), respectively; in corneal tissue (μg/g) were 0.95 (0.60 to 1.02), 0.37 (0.32 to 0.47), and 0.48 (0.34 to 0.95), respectively; and in AH were lower than the limit of quantification in all groups. Concentrations of moxifloxacin for groups 1, 2, and 3 in tears (μg/mL) were 188.7 (44.5 to 669.2), 107.4 (41.7 to 296.5), and 178.1 (70.1 to 400.6), respectively; in corneal tissue (μg/g) were 1.84 (1.44 to 2.11), 0.78 (0.55 to 0.98), and 0.77 (0.65 to 0.97), respectively; and in AH (μg/mL) were 0.06 (0.04 to 0.08), 0.03 (0.02 to 0.05), and 0.02 (0.01 to 0.04), respectively. Corneal moxifloxacin concentrations were significantly higher in group 1 than groups 2 and 3.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—After topical ocular administration, fluoroquinolones can reach therapeutic concentrations in tears and corneal tissue of horses, even when there is an intact epithelium.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the hemodynamic effects of orally administered carvedilol in healthy dogs with doses that might be used to initiate treatment in dogs with congestive heart failure.

Animals—24 healthy dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were randomly allocated to receive carvedilol PO at a dose of 1.56, 3.125, or 12.5 mg, twice daily for 7 to 10 days; 6 dogs served as controls. Investigators were blinded to group assignment. Hemodynamic variables were recorded prior to administration of the drug on day 1 and then 2, 4, and 6 hours after the morning dose on day 1 and days 7 to 10. Change in heart rate after IV administration of 1 µg of isoproterenol/kg and change in systemic arterial blood pressure after IV administration of 8 µg of phenylephrine/kg were recorded 2 and 6 hours after administration of carvedilol.

Results—Administration of carvedilol did not significantly affect resting hemodynamic variables or response to phenylephrine. The interaction of day and carvedilol dose had a significant effect on resting heart rate, but a significant main effect of carvedilol dose on resting heart rate was not detected. Increasing carvedilol dose resulted in a significant linear decrease in heart rate response to isoproterenol.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In healthy conscious dogs, orally administered carvedilol at mean doses from 0.08 to 0.54 mg/kg given twice daily did not affect resting hemodynamics. Over the dose range evaluated, there was a dose-dependent attenuation of the response to isoproterenol, which provided evidence of β-adrenergic receptor antagonism. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:637–641)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate differences in response to ID injection of histamine, phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and Aspergillus organisms between clinically normal horses and horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO).

Animals—5 healthy adult horses and 5 adult horses with RAO.

Procedure—Intradermal testing (IDT) was performed on the neck with 2 positive control substances (histamine and PHA) and a mixture comprising 5 Aspergillus species. Four concentrations of each test substance plus a negative control substance were used. Equal volumes (0.1 mL) of each test substance were prepared to yield 15 syringes ([4 concentrations of each test substance plus 1 negative control substance] times 3 test substances) for each side of each horse (ie, 30 syringes/horse). Intradermal injections were administered; diameter of wheals was recorded 0.5, 4, and 24 hours after injection.

Results—Hypersensitive responses to ID injection of histamine were detected 0.5 hours after injection, and a delay in wheal formation after ID injection of Aspergillus mixture 24 hours after injection was detected in RAO-affected horses but was not observed in clinically normal horses. No differences were detected between the 2 groups after ID injection of PHA.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—RAO-affected horses are hypersensitive to histamine, suggesting that RAO is associated with a heightened vascular response to histamine. Higher concentrations of Aspergillus mixture may be needed to detect horses that are sensitive to this group of antigens. Wheal reactions to Aspergillus may be a delayed response, suggesting that IDT results should be evaluated 0.5, 4, and 24 hours after ID injection. (Am J Vet Res2005;66:1348–1355)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the precision of intradermal testing (IDT) in horses.

Animals—12 healthy adult horses.

Procedure—IDT was performed on the neck of each horse by use of 2 positive control substances (histamine and phytohemagglutinin [PHA]) and a negative control substance. An equal volume (0.1 mL) for each injection was prepared to yield a total of 20 syringes ([4 concentrations of each positive control substance plus 1 negative control substance] times 2 positive control substances times 2 duplicative tests) for each side of the neck. Both sides of the neck were used for IDT; therefore, 40 syringes were prepared for each horse. Hair was clipped on both sides of the neck, and ID injections were performed. Diameter of the skin wheals was recorded 0.5, 4, and 24 hours after ID injection.

Results—Intra- and interhorse skin reactions to ID injection of histamine and PHA resulted in wheals of uniform size at 0.5 and 4 hours, respectively. Significant intra- and interhorse variation was detected in wheals caused by PHA at 24 hours.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—ID injection of histamine and PHA caused repeatable and precise results at 0.5 and 4 hours, respectively. Concentrations of 0.005 mg of histamine/mL and 0.1 mg of PHA/mL are recommended for use as positive control substances for IDT in horses. This information suggests that consistent wheal size is evident for ID injection of control substances, and variation in wheals in response to ID injection of test antigens results from a horse's immune response to specific antigens. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1341–1347)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the duration of effect and the effect of multiple doses of topical ophthalmic application of 0.5% proparacaine hydrochloride on corneal sensitivity in clinically normal dogs.

Animals—8 clinically normal dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were randomly allocated to treatment order in a 2 × 2 (period × treatment) crossover study. Treatments consisted of topical application of ophthalmic 0.5% proparacaine (1 drop or 2 drops at a 1-minute interval); treatments were applied to both eyes. A Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometer was used to determine corneal touch threshold (CTT) before corneal application, 1 and 5 minutes after corneal application, and at 5-minute intervals thereafter for 90 minutes.

Results—The CTT value before treatment differed significantly from CTT values after treatment until 45 minutes after application in the 1-drop group and until 55 minutes after application in the 2-drop group. As determined by use of the Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometer, a significantly greater anesthetic effect was detected for the 2-drop treatment, compared with the effect for the 1-drop treatment, at 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, and 55 minutes after application. Maximal anesthetic effect lasted for 15 minutes for the 1-drop treatment and 25 minutes for the 2-drop treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Duration of corneal anesthetic effect induced by topical ophthalmic application of 0.5% proparacaine in dogs of this study is considerably longer than that reported elsewhere. Serial application of doses of 0.5% proparacaine increases the duration and magnitude of corneal anesthetic effects. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:77–80)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess changes in systemic hydration, concentrations of electrolytes in plasma, hydration of colonic contents and feces, and gastrointestinal transit in horses treated with IV fluid therapy or enteral administration of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4), sodium sulfate (NaSO4), water, or a balanced electrolyte solution.

Animals—7 horses with fistulas in the right dorsal colon (RDC).

Procedure—In a crossover design, horses alternately received 1 of 6 treatments: no treatment (control); IV fluid therapy with lactated Ringer's solution; or enteral administration of MgSO4, Na2SO4, water, or a balanced electrolyte solution via nasogastric intubation. Physical examinations were performed and samples of blood, RDC contents, and feces were collected every 6 hours during the 48 hour-observation period. Horses were muzzled for the initial 24 hours but had access to water ad libitum. Horses had access to hay, salt, and water ad libitum for the last 24 hours.

Results—Enteral administration of a balanced electrolyte solution and Na2SO4 were the best treatments for promoting hydration of RDC contents, followed by water. Sodium sulfate was the best treatment for promoting fecal hydration, followed by MgSO4 and the balanced electrolyte solution. Sodium sulfate caused hypocalcemia and hypernatremia, and water caused hyponatremia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Enteral administration of a balanced electrolyte solution promoted hydration of RDC contents and may be useful in horses with large colon impactions. Enteral administration of either Na2SO4 or water may promote hydration of RDC contents but can cause severe electrolyte imbalances. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:695–704)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess changes in systemic hydration, concentrations of plasma electrolytes, hydration and physical properties of colonic contents and feces, and gastrointestinal transit in horses with access to large amounts of grain.

Animals—6 horses with right dorsal colon (RDC) fistulas.

Procedure—In a crossover design, horses were alternately fed 1 of 3 diets: orchard grass hay ad libitum after being adapted to this diet for at least 5 days, orchard grass hay ad libitum and 4.55 kg of grain offered every 12 hours after being adapted to orchard grass hay ad libitum for at least 5 days, or orchard grass hay ad libitum and 4.55 kg of grain offered every 12 hours after being adapted to this diet for at least 5 days. Physical examinations were performed and samples of blood, colonic contents, and feces were collected every 6 hours during a 48-hour observation period.

Results—Grain ingestion had several effects, including changes in the concentrations of electrolytes in plasma; RDC contents became more homogenous, dehydrated, foamy, and less dense; RDC contents flowed spontaneously when the cannula was opened; RDC contents expanded when heated in an oven; and feces became fetid and less formed. Horses did not have any clinical signs of colic, endotoxemia, or laminitis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Changes observed in the colonic contents and feces may be explained by the large amounts of hydrolyzable carbohydrates provided by grain. Access to large amounts of grain may increase the risk of tympany and displacement of the large intestine. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:687–694)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare the effects of 2 preoperative anti-inflammatory regimens on intraocular inflammation following phacoemulsification.

Design—Randomized controlled trial

Animals—21 dogs with immature cataracts.

Procedures—All dogs had cataract surgery via phacoemulsification, and most received prosthetic intraocular lenses. Dogs were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group A dogs were treated topically with prednisolone acetate for 7 days prior to surgery, whereas prednisolone acetate treatment commenced the evening prior to surgery in group B dogs. Postoperative care was identical for both groups. Blood-aqueous barrier breakdown was quantified by use of anterior chamber fluorophotometry, with fluorescein entry into the anterior chamber measured 2 and 9 days after surgery compared with baseline scans obtained prior to surgery. Ophthalmic examinations were performed before surgery and 1 day, 9 days, 3 weeks, 7 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. A subjective inflammation score was established at each examination. Intraocular pressures were measured 4 and 8 hours after surgery and at each follow-up examination.

Results—There was no difference in the extent of blood-aqueous barrier disruption between the groups at 2 or 9 days after surgery. Subjective inflammation scores were also similar at most time points. Dogs in group A developed postoperative ocular hypertension at a higher frequency (60%) than did those in group B (18%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs that underwent cataract surgery via phacoemulsification, a full week of topical prednisolone acetate treatment prior to surgery did not decrease postoperative inflammation, compared with commencement of topical prednisolone acetate treatment the evening prior to surgery, and was associated with a greater incidence of postoperative ocular hypertension.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To document ocular findings in cats with blastomycosis.

ANIMALS

35 cats with blastomycosis.

PROCEDURES

Medical records from 1978 through 2019 were reviewed to identify cats with confirmed Blastomyces infection. Cats were grouped as having or not having ocular involvement. Clinical signs, histopathologic findings, and response to treatment were evaluated.

RESULTS

21 of the 35 (60%) cats with confirmed blastomycosis had ocular abnormalities. Two of 21 cats with ocular abnormalities also had systemic hypertension and were excluded. Of the remaining 19 cats, 15 (79%) had bilateral ocular signs. Ten (53%) cats had inflammatory ocular lesions, and 9 (47%) had neuro-ophthalmic abnormalities. Six of the 19 (32%) cats appeared to be completely blind, and 5 (26%) appeared to be unilaterally blind. For the 10 cats with inflammatory ocular lesions, the most common lesions were anterior uveitis (9/20 eyes), active chorioretinitis (6/20 eyes), and retinal detachment (4/20 eyes). For the 9 cats with neuro-ophthalmic abnormalities, the most common abnormalities were a negative menace or tracking response (10/18 eyes) and negative pupillary light response (4/18 eyes).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that ocular involvement is common in cats with blastomycosis and that both inflammatory lesions and neuro-ophthalmic abnormalities can be seen. Blastomycosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for cats with anterior uveitis, posterior segment inflammation, or neuro-ophthalmic abnormalities, and a complete ophthalmic examination should be performed in all cats with confirmed or suspected blastomycosis.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify apoptosis in equine intestines and determine whether apoptosis is associated with gastrointestinal tract disease or a specific tissue layer of intestine.

Animals—38 horses that underwent surgery or were euthanatized for small or large intestine obstruction, strangulation, or distension and 9 control horses euthanatized for reasons other than gastrointestinal tract disease or systemic disease.

Procedure—Specimens were collected at surgery from intestine involved in the primary lesion and distant to the primary lesion site or at necropsy from several sites including the primary lesion site. Histologic tissue sections were stained with H&E, and apoptosis was detected by use of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling technique. The number of apoptotic cells per hpf was counted in the mucosa, circular muscle, longitudinal muscle, and serosa.

Results—Apoptotic nuclei were seen in all layers of intestine. An increased number of apoptotic cells was found in the circular muscle of the intestine from horses with simple obstruction, compared with strangulating obstruction or healthy intestine. Intestine distant from a primary strangulating lesion had higher numbers of apoptotic cells than did intestine distant from a simple obstructive lesion or intestine taken at the site of a strangulating or simple obstructive lesion.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Intestine from horses with obstructing or strangulating lesions in the small intestine and large colon had high numbers of apoptotic cells possibly because of ischemic cell injury and subsequent inflammation. Whether substantial apoptosis affects intestinal function is not yet known. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:982–988)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research