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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of topically applied 2% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) ophthalmic solution on aqueous humor flow rate (AHFR) and intraocular pressure (IOP) in clinically normal dogs.

Animals—21 clinically normal dogs.

Procedures—A randomized longitudinal crossover design was used. Following acquisition of baseline IOP (morning and evening) and AHFR (afternoon only) data, dogs were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups and received 1 drop of either 2% THC solution or a control treatment (olive oil vehicle) to 1 randomly selected eye every 12 hours for 9 doses. The IOPs and AHFRs were reassessed after the final treatment. Following a washout period of ≥ 7 days, dogs were administered the alternate treatment in the same eye, and measurements were repeated.

Results—Mean ± SD IOPs in the morning were 15.86 ± 2.48 mm Hg at baseline, 12.54 ± 3.18 mm Hg after THC treatment, and 13.88 ± 3.28 mm Hg after control treatment. Mean ± SD IOPs in the evening were 13.69 ± 3.36 mm Hg at baseline, 11.69 ± 3.94 mm Hg after THC treatment, and 12.13 ± 2.99 mm Hg after control treatment. Mean IOPs were significantly decreased from baseline after administration of THC solution but not the control treatment. Changes in IOP varied substantially among individual dogs. Mean ± SD AHFRs were not significantly different from baseline for either treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Topical application of 2% THC ophthalmic solution resulted in moderate reduction of mean IOP in clinically normal dogs. Further research is needed to determine efficacy in dogs with glaucoma.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the tear film osmolality and electrolyte composition in healthy horses.

ANIMALS 15 healthy adult horses.

PROCEDURES Each horse was manually restrained, and an ophthalmic examination, which included slit-lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, and a Schirmer tear test, was performed. Tear samples were collected from both eyes with microcapillary tubes 3 times at 5-minute intervals. The tear samples for each horse were pooled, and the osmolality and electrolyte concentrations were measured. The mean (SD) was calculated for each variable to establish preliminary guidelines for tear film osmolality and electrolyte composition in healthy horses.

RESULTS The mean (SD) tear film osmolality was 283.51 (9.33) mmol/kg, and the mean (SD) sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium concentrations were 134.75 (10), 16.3 (5.77), 3.48 (1.97), and 1.06 (0.42) mmol/L, respectively. The sodium concentration in the tear film was similar to that in serum, whereas the potassium concentration in the tear film was approximately 4.75 times that of serum.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results provided preliminary guidelines with which tear samples obtained from horses with keratopathies can be compared. Measurement of tear film osmolality in these horses was easy and noninvasive. The tear film concentration of divalent cations was greater than expected and was higher than the divalent cation concentrations in the tear films of rabbits and humans. These data may be clinically useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of hyperosmolar ocular surface disease in horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of deracoxib and aspirin on serum concentrations of thyroxine (T4), 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3), free thyroxine (fT4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in healthy dogs.

Animals—24 dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were allocated to 1 of 3 groups of 8 dogs each. Dogs received the vehicle used for deracoxib tablets (PO, q 8 h; placebo), aspirin (23 to 25 mg/kg, PO, q 8 h), or deracoxib (1.25 to 1.8 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) and placebo (PO, q 8 h) for 28 days. Measurement of serum concentrations of T4, T3, fT4, and TSH were performed 7 days before treatment (day −7), on days 14 and 28 of treatment, and 14 days after treatment was discontinued. Plasma total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrations were measured on days −7 and 28.

Results—Mean serum T4, fT4, and T3 concentrations decreased significantly from baseline on days 14 and 28 of treatment in dogs receiving aspirin, compared with those receiving placebo. Mean plasma total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrations on day 28 decreased significantly in dogs receiving aspirin, compared with those receiving placebo. Fourteen days after administration of aspirin was stopped, differences in hormone concentrations were no longer significant. Differences in serum TSH or the free fraction of T4 were not detected at any time. No significant difference in any of the analytes was detected at any time in dogs treated with deracoxib.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Aspirin had substantial suppressive effects on thyroid hormone concentrations in dogs. Treatment with high dosages of aspirin, but not deracoxib, should be discontinued prior to evaluation of thyroid function.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the outcome and describe the complications associated with use of an Ahmed gonioimplant in the treatment of glaucoma in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—9 client-owned sighted dogs (median age, 9 years) with primary glaucoma.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs with primary glaucoma that underwent unilateral gonioimplant placement (in 2000 through 2008), during which a temporalis muscle fascia graft (n = 8) or porcine intestinal submucosa (1) was used to cover the implant tube as it exited the globe, were reviewed. All dogs were treated with mitomycin C in the conjunctival pocket intraoperatively and with tissue plasminogen activator immediately after surgery; 1% prednisolone acetate was applied to the implanted eye daily until failure of the implant. Medical intervention or additional surgery was performed when intraocular pressures (IOPs) were > 20 mm Hg or progressively increasing values were detected.

Results—After gonioimplant placement, IOP was controlled for a variable period in all dogs. Subsequently, IOP exceeded 20 mm Hg in 7 dogs (median postoperative interval, 326 days). Median interval to vision loss despite interventional surgery was 518 days (range, 152 to 1,220 days). Surgical intervention was necessary in 4 dogs to maintain satisfactory IOP. Implant extrusion attributable to conjunctival dehiscence or necrosis occurred in 4 dogs. At 365 days after surgery, 8 dogs retained vision, and 5 dogs retained vision throughout follow-up.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs with medically refractory primary glaucoma, placement of a gonioimplant appears to be effective in maintaining vision.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To identify morphologic differences in ovaries from cows persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and determine ovarian cell types infected in these cows.

Design

A comparative study of ovaries in cattle persistently infected with BVDV and cattle not persistently infected with BVDV, using morphologic and immunohistochemical analysis.

Animals

6 postpubertal cows persistently infected with BVDV and 6 postpubertal cows not persistently infected with BVDV.

Procedure

Ovaries were compared morphologically by counting the number of normal structures present on 3 histologic sections taken from each ovary. Immunohistochemistry was accomplished, using an indirect, monoclonal antibody-linked, avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex procedure.

Results

Significant (P < 0.01) decrease in the number of tertiary follicles, graafian follicles, atretic follicles, and corpus hemorrhagicum/luteum/albicans was observed in cows persistently infected with BVDV. No difference in numbers of primordial or secondary follicles was observed. Immunostaining of BVDV antigen in luteal cells and macrophage-like cells was evident in ovaries from cows persistently infected with BVDV.

Conclusions

Cows persistently infected with BVDV appear to have significant morphologic changes in their ovaries that suggest reduction in normal ovarian activities. Furthermore, BVDV antigen can be identified in specific ovarian cell types in cattle persistently infected with BVDV.

Clinical Relevance

The changes observed may reduce reproductive performance in cows persistently infected with BVDV, and may be of importance when trying to salvage valuable genetic material from persistently infected cows through embryo transfer. It is yet to be determined whether similar findings are true in cows acutely infected with BVDV. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:830–833)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess changes in systemic hydration, concentrations of plasma electrolytes, hydration and physical properties of colonic contents and feces, and gastrointestinal transit in horses with access to large amounts of grain.

Animals—6 horses with right dorsal colon (RDC) fistulas.

Procedure—In a crossover design, horses were alternately fed 1 of 3 diets: orchard grass hay ad libitum after being adapted to this diet for at least 5 days, orchard grass hay ad libitum and 4.55 kg of grain offered every 12 hours after being adapted to orchard grass hay ad libitum for at least 5 days, or orchard grass hay ad libitum and 4.55 kg of grain offered every 12 hours after being adapted to this diet for at least 5 days. Physical examinations were performed and samples of blood, colonic contents, and feces were collected every 6 hours during a 48-hour observation period.

Results—Grain ingestion had several effects, including changes in the concentrations of electrolytes in plasma; RDC contents became more homogenous, dehydrated, foamy, and less dense; RDC contents flowed spontaneously when the cannula was opened; RDC contents expanded when heated in an oven; and feces became fetid and less formed. Horses did not have any clinical signs of colic, endotoxemia, or laminitis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Changes observed in the colonic contents and feces may be explained by the large amounts of hydrolyzable carbohydrates provided by grain. Access to large amounts of grain may increase the risk of tympany and displacement of the large intestine. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:687–694)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess changes in systemic hydration, concentrations of electrolytes in plasma, hydration of colonic contents and feces, and gastrointestinal transit in horses treated with IV fluid therapy or enteral administration of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4), sodium sulfate (NaSO4), water, or a balanced electrolyte solution.

Animals—7 horses with fistulas in the right dorsal colon (RDC).

Procedure—In a crossover design, horses alternately received 1 of 6 treatments: no treatment (control); IV fluid therapy with lactated Ringer's solution; or enteral administration of MgSO4, Na2SO4, water, or a balanced electrolyte solution via nasogastric intubation. Physical examinations were performed and samples of blood, RDC contents, and feces were collected every 6 hours during the 48 hour-observation period. Horses were muzzled for the initial 24 hours but had access to water ad libitum. Horses had access to hay, salt, and water ad libitum for the last 24 hours.

Results—Enteral administration of a balanced electrolyte solution and Na2SO4 were the best treatments for promoting hydration of RDC contents, followed by water. Sodium sulfate was the best treatment for promoting fecal hydration, followed by MgSO4 and the balanced electrolyte solution. Sodium sulfate caused hypocalcemia and hypernatremia, and water caused hyponatremia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Enteral administration of a balanced electrolyte solution promoted hydration of RDC contents and may be useful in horses with large colon impactions. Enteral administration of either Na2SO4 or water may promote hydration of RDC contents but can cause severe electrolyte imbalances. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:695–704)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate antiplatelet effects and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel in cats.

Design—Original study.

Animals—5 purpose-bred domestic cats.

Procedure—Clopidogrel was administered at dosages of 75 mg, PO, every 24 hours for 10 days; 37.5 mg, PO, every 24 hours for 10 days; and 18.75 mg, PO, every 24 hours for 7 days. In all cats, treatments were administered in this order, with at least 2 weeks between treatments. Platelet aggregation in response to ADP and collagen and oral mucosal bleeding times (OMBTs) were measured before and 3, 7, and 10 days (75 and 37.5 mg) or 7 days (18.75 mg) after initiation of drug administration. Serotonin concentration in plasma following stimulation of platelets with ADP or collagen was measured before and on the last day of drug administration. Platelet aggregation, OMBT, and serotonin concentration were evaluated at various times after drug administration was discontinued to determine when drug effects were lost.

Results—For all 3 dosages, platelet aggregation in response to ADP, platelet aggregation in response to collagen, and serotonin concentration were significantly reduced and OMBT was significantly increased at all measurement times during drug administration periods. All values returned to baseline values by 7 days after drug administration was discontinued. No significant differences were identified between doses. None of the cats developed adverse effects associated with drug administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that administration of clopidogrel at dosages ranging from 18.75 to 75 mg, PO, every 24 hours, results in significant antiplatelet effects in cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1406–1411)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether ticlopidine exerts an antiplatelet effect, estimate the pharmacodynamics of ticlopidine, and evaluate any acute adverse effects associated with administration of ticlopidine in cats.

Animals—8 domestic purpose-bred sexually intact male cats.

Procedure—Ticlopidine was administered orally (50 mg, q 24 h; 100 mg, q 24 h; 200 mg, q 24 h; and 250 mg, q 12 h). Each treatment period consisted of 10 days of drug administration. Platelet aggregation studies with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen and evaluation of oral mucosal bleeding times (OMBTs) were performed on days 3, 7, and 10 during each drug administration. Serotonin was measured to evaluate secretion at baseline and on day 10 for cats that received the 250-mg dosage.

Results—A significant reduction in platelet aggregation was detected in response to ADP on days 7 and 10 at 100 mg, on day 3 at 200 mg, and on days 3, 7, and 10 at 250 mg. A significant increase in the OMBT and decrease in serotonin release on day 10 at 250 mg was also detected; however, the cats had anorexia and vomiting at the 250-mg dosage.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although there was a consistent antiplatelet effect at the 250-mg dosage, there was dose-dependent anorexia and vomiting that we conclude precludes the clinical usefulness of this drug in cats. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:327–332)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research