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Abstract

Objective—To describe the technique and determine outcome for male cats with urethral obstruction treated with fluoroscopically guided percutaneous antegrade urethral catheterization (PAUC).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—9 client-owned neutered male cats with urethral obstruction and inability to pass a retrograde urinary catheter.

Procedures—Information regarding the procedure and hospitalization was obtained from medical records. Long-term follow-up was obtained via medical record review or telephone interview.

Results—Diagnoses included iatrogenic urethral tear (n = 6), obstructive urethral calculi (1), urethral ulceration (1), and urethral stricture (1). Seven of the 9 procedures were successful. The 2 patients in which PAUC failed had mechanical obstructions preventing guide wire access across the urethral obstruction. Procedure times ranged from 25 to 120 minutes. No complications were noted in any patients during the procedure. One patient was euthanized because of unrelated disease. Follow-up information was available for 6 of 8 surviving patients. No complications that could be directly attributed to the procedure were noted. All 6 patients had a perineal urethrostomy performed 0 days to 6 weeks following the procedure because of reobstruction of the lower urinary tract. None of these patients had documented urethral strictures and none had recurrence of clinical signs following perineal urethrostomy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that PAUC can be a simple, rapid, minimally invasive, and safe technique to facilitate transurethral catheterization in select cases. Patients with iatrogenic urethral tears may be good candidates. Patients with impacted urethral calculi, severe strictures or ulcerations, or a nondistended urinary bladder may be less amenable to PAUC.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—An 11-year-old castrated male mixed-breed dog was examined for a 3-month history of hematochezia and tenesmus. Abdominal ultrasonography and rectal examination prior to referral had revealed a colorectal polyp, diagnosed as a benign colorectal polypoid adenoma after histologic examination of tissue samples. The patient was referred for treatment.

Clinical Findings—A 2-cm-diameter sessile polypoid mass was located approximately 6 cm orad to the anus in the right dorsolateral region of the descending colon just caudal to the pubis. There was no evidence of metastasis on thoracic radiography or abdominal ultrasonography. Results of a CBC and serum biochemical analysis were within reference limits.

Treatment and Outcome—Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and snare electrocautery were used to resect the mass and a definitive histopathologic diagnosis of a sessile colorectal polypoid adenoma was made. A 9.9-mm gastroduodenoscope was used during colonoscopy to inspect the mass. To aid in EMR, a 25-gauge endoscopic injection needle was used to infuse sterile saline (0.9% NaCl) solution under the base of the polyp, into the submucosa to elevate the mucosa from the muscularis layer beneath the polyp prior to polypectomy. This was necessary because of the sessile, rather than pedunculated, base of the mass. The entire polyp was successfully removed with endoscopic guidance. The clinical signs of hematochezia and tenesmus resolved immediately, and serial rectal examinations were performed over the following 36 months with no palpable evidence of recurrence.

Clinical Relevance—The patient described in the present report underwent successful colonic EMR and snare polypectomy with no known evidence of mass recurrence during the following 36 months, suggesting that this minimally invasive procedure may be a valuable treatment option for sessile polyps. The advantage of this technique was that elevation of the mucosa via injection of saline solution improved visibility of the polyp and helped to separate the polyp base from the deeper submucosal colorectal tissue, making complete resection possible.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—Two adult male castrated cats were evaluated because of a history of constipation, tenesmus, or intermittent vomiting.

Clinical Findings—Radiography and ultrasonography revealed luminal narrowing in the colon of 1 cat and a colonic mass in the other. A histopathologic diagnosis of colonic adenocarcinoma was made in both cats.

Treatment and Outcome—Under fluoroscopic guidance, a self-expanding metallic stent was advanced over a wire and across the area of colonic stenosis and deployed. One cat had progressive weight loss but maintained a normal appetite, energy, and a high quality of life. Fecal continence was maintained, and tenesmus was rarely observed. The cat was euthanized because of tumor metastasis 274 days after the colonic stent was placed. The other cat retained fecal continence, and the owners reported subjective improvement in the severity of tenesmus, compared with that prior to stent placement. The cat was euthanized 19 days after stent placement because of perceived decreased quality of life.

Clinical Relevance—The use of self-expanding metallic stents for alleviation of colonic obstruction secondary to adenocarcinoma in cats appears to be effective. This technique provides a simple, quick, nonsurgical option for palliation in cats with advanced metastatic or systemic disease in which surgical resection may not be possible or warranted.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION 4 cats were examined because of ureteral obstruction.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Clinical and clinicopathologic abnormalities were nonspecific and included anorexia, lethargy, weight loss, anemia, leukocytosis, neutrophilia, lymphopenia, and azotemia. A diagnosis of pyonephrosis was made in all cats. The presence of bacteriuria was confirmed by means of urinalysis in 2 cats, bacterial culture of a urine sample obtained by means of preoperative cystocentesis in 2 cats, and bacterial culture of samples obtained from the renal pelvis intraoperatively in 3 cats. Ureteral obstruction was caused by a urolith in 3 cats; ureteral stricture associated with a circumcaval ureter was identified in 1 cat.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME All 4 cats underwent renal pelvis lavage and placement of a subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) device for treatment of obstructive pyonephrosis. Postoperatively, the cystostomy tube became occluded with purulent material in 1 cat, requiring exchange. The procedure was successful in relieving the obstruction and pyonephrosis in all cats. Three of 4 cats had documented resolution of urinary tract infection. One cat had persistent bacteriuria without clinical signs 1 month after SUB device placement.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this small series suggested that renal pelvis lavage with placement of an SUB device may be a treatment option for cats with obstructive pyonephrosis.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe the technical aspects and clinical outcome of endoscopic- and fluoroscopic-guided ureteropelvic lavage and ureteral stent placement for treatment of obstructive pyonephrosis in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—13 client-owned dogs (14 obstructed ureters).

Procedures—All patients with obstructive pyonephrosis were treated with a ureteral stent. Medical records were reviewed for history, clinical signs, pre- and postprocedural clinical and imaging data, and short- and long-term outcomes.

Results—13 dogs (14 ureters) had unilateral or bilateral ureteral obstructions and pyonephrosis due to ureterolithiasis (n = 13) or a suspected ureteral stricture (1). Eleven dogs had positive results of bacteriologic culture of urine obtained from the bladder, renal pelvis, or both. Ten were thrombocytopenic, and 8 were azotemic. Stents were placed fluoroscopically with endoscopic (n = 11) or surgical (3) assistance. Median hospitalization time was 48 hours (range, 6 to 260 hours). Median follow-up time was 480 days (range, 2 to 1,460 days). Intraoperative complications occurred in 2 patients (stent occlusion from shearing of a guide wire, and wire penetration of the ureter at the location of a stone). Short-term complications included a bladder hematoma (n = 1) and transient dysuria (1). Long-term complications included stent encrustation (n = 1), stent migration (1), and tissue proliferation at the ureterovesicular junction (5), which had no clinical implications. Recurrent urinary tract infections were documented in 7 dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ureteral stenting was a successful renal-sparing treatment for obstructive pyonephrosis in dogs and could often be performed in a minimally invasive manner. There were few major complications. This technique may be considered as an effective treatment option for this condition in dogs.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association