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Abstract

Objective—To measure respiratory motion of the thoracic wall region in dogs using a real-time motion tracking system and compare the amount of respiratory motion between dogs positioned with and without a vacuum-formable cushion.

Animals—8 healthy adult mixed-breed dogs (median weight, 23 kg).

Procedures—Dogs were anesthetized and positioned in sternal and dorsal recumbency with and without a vacuum-formable cushion. Three-dimensional movement of anatomic landmarks was measured with a real-time motion capture system that tracked the locations of infrared light–emitting diodes attached externally to the dorsal or ventral and lateral aspects of the thoracic wall.

Results—Dogs positioned in sternal recumbency had significantly less cranial-to-caudal and left-to-right respiratory motion at the lateral aspect of the thoracic wall, compared with dogs positioned in dorsal recumbency, whether or not a cushion was used. For dogs treated in sternal recumbency, use of a cushion significantly increased the peak displacement vector (overall movement in 3-D space) for 3 of 4 marker locations on the dorsal thoracic wall. As respiratory rate increased, respiratory motion at the lateral and ventral aspects of the thoracic wall decreased when data for all dogs in dorsal recumbency were evaluated together.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Associations between respiratory rate and respiratory motion suggested that the use of rapid, shallow ventilation may be beneficial for dogs undergoing highly conformal radiation treatment. These results provide a basis for further research on respiratory motion in anesthetized dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the sensitivity of a real-time PCR assay for the detection of Tritrichomonas foetus in protozoal cultures of preputial scraping samples pooled from up to 25 bulls and to determine the specificity of that assay for detection of T foetus in cultures for individual animals.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—188 bulls and 150 steers.

Procedures—Preputial scraping samples were collected, placed in a culture kit, and incubated at 37°C for 7 days. Cultures for individual animals were tested for T foetus by means of a real-time PCR assay. Pools of protozoal cultures were made by including fixed aliquots of samples with known positive and negative results in ratios of 1:2, 1:3, 1:5, 1:10, 1:15, 1:20, and 1:25. Specificities of the real-time PCR assay and culture for detection of T foetus in samples obtained from individual animals and sensitivity of real-time PCR assay for each evaluated pool ratio were determined.

Results—Specificity estimates for culture and the real-time PCR assay for detection of T foetus in preputial scraping samples for individual animals were not significantly different (98.8% and 100%, respectively). Sensitivities of the real-time PCR assay for the various pooled samples with known positive and negative T foetus results were not significantly different; overall sensitivity of the assay was 94%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated the evaluated real-time PCR assay had high specificity and good sensitivity for the detection of T foetus in pooled protozoal cultures of preputial scraping samples obtained from up to 25 animals.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare blood glucose (BG) concentrations measured with a portable blood glucose meter in blood samples obtained with a marginal ear vein (MEV) nick technique, from a peripheral venous catheter, and by direct venipuncture in healthy cats and cats with diabetes mellitus.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—10 healthy cats and 11 cats with diabetes mellitus.

Procedure—On day 1, blood samples were collected every hour for 10 hours by the MEV nick technique and from a peripheral venous catheter. On day 2, blood samples were collected every hour for 10 hours by the MEV nick technique and by direct venipuncture of the medial saphenous vein.

Results—For all cats, mean BG concentration for samples collected by the MEV nick technique was not significantly different from mean concentration for samples obtained from the peripheral venous catheter. For healthy cats, mean BG concentration for samples collected by the MEV nick technique was not significantly different from mean concentration for samples obtained by direct venipuncture. For cats with diabetes mellitus, mean BG concentration for samples collected by the MEV nick technique was significantly different from mean concentration for samples obtained by direct venipuncture; however, for the range of concentrations examined, this difference was not clinically important.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that for the range of concentrations examined, the MEV nick technique is a reasonable alternative to venous blood collection for serial measurement of BG concentrations in cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002; 221:389–392)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To describe self-reported radiation safety practices by equine veterinary technicians in North America and identify factors associated with these practices.

SAMPLE

154 equine technicians.

PROCEDURES

An electronic questionnaire regarding radiation safety practices during the use of portable x-ray equipment was sent to 884 members of the American Association of Equine Veterinary Technicians and Assistants. Data were summarized, and various factors were evaluated for associations with reported safety practices.

RESULTS

221 of 884 (25.0%) questionnaires were completed, including 154 by equine technicians who had been involved in equine radiography as x-ray tube operators, cassette holders, or both in the previous year. Lead apron use was suboptimal, reported as “always” for 80.0% (104/130) of tube operators and 83.1% (123/148) of cassette holders. Approximately 20% of participants never wore thyroid shields, and approximately 90% never wore lead eyeglasses. Almost 50% of participants did not have lead eyeglasses available. Although > 55% of participants always held the x-ray equipment by hand, 58.4% (73/125) of tube operators and 25.0% (35/140) of cassette holders never wore gloves. Cassette holders wore lead gloves and personal radiation dose–monitoring devices significantly more frequently than did tube operators.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Compliance of North American equine technicians with radiation safety recommendations by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements was suboptimal. Improvements in radiation safety training and education, strengthening the connection between academic institutions and private practices, and greater availability and requirement of personal protective equipment use by senior clinicians and employers might aid in improving safety practices.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical sensitivity and specificity of a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay for Campylobacter fetus subsp venerealis (Cfv) in preputial samples of bulls.

Animals—313 beef bulls.

Procedures—Preputial samples were collected from 300 virgin bulls and 13 Cfv-infected bulls. Specificity of the qRT-PCR assay, determined on the basis of results for samples collected from virgin bulls, was compared with specificity of bacteriologic culture performed with transport enrichment medium (TEM). Sensitivity of the qRT-PCR assay, determined on the basis of results for multiple samples collected at weekly intervals from infected bulls, was compared with sensitivity of the direct fluorescent antibody test (DFAT), bacteriologic culture, and bacteriologic culture with TEM.

Results—Specificity was 85% for the qRT-PCR assay and 100% for bacteriologic culture; results were significantly different. Mean sensitivity was 85.4% for the qRT-PCR assay, 82.3% for direct culture in blood agar, 72.1% for the DFAT, 32.7% for direct culture in Skirrow agar, 30% for bacteriologic culture with TEM and blood agar, and 38.1% for bacteriologic culture with TEM and Skirrow agar. Differences in sensitivity among tests varied with ambient outdoor temperature. Repeated sampling significantly increased sensitivity of the qRT-PCR assay.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Use of the qRT-PCR assay as a screening test on direct preputial samples had comparable sensitivity to bacteriologic culture, and repeated sampling improved sensitivity. Although improved performance of the qRT-PCR assay, compared with direct bacteriologic culture, was dependent on temperature, transport times that allow direct culture are unlikely under field conditions. The qRT-PCR assay would provide a fast and sensitive screening method for Cfv in bulls.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the relationship between inflammatory responses of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint in clinically normal horses.

Animals—7 mature horses.

Procedures—In each horse, 1 TMJ and 1 MCP joint were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.0025 μg). The contralateral TMJ and MCP joint were injected with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Synovial fluid samples were collected from all 4 joints over 24 hours after injection. Concentrations of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor-β, and total protein were measured via immunoassay. Horses were assessed for clinical signs of joint inflammation at each time point.

Results—Concentrations of interleukin-6 were not significantly different between LPS-injected MCP joints and TMJs at any time point. Transforming growth factor-β concentrations were significantly increased in MCP joints, compared with concentrations in TMJs, at 12 and 24 hours after injection. Tumor necrosis factor-α concentrations were significantly higher in LPS-injected TMJs than in LPS-injected MCP joints at 1 and 6 hours after injection. Total protein concentration did not differ significantly between LPS-injected MCP joints and TMJs. Injection of LPS induced clinical inflammation at all time points; additionally, 2 MCP joints (but no TMJs) had an inflammatory response to injection of saline solution.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The inflammatory response to LPS appeared to be attenuated more quickly in TMJs than in MCP joints of horses. The difference in response suggested that a lack of clinical osteoarthritis in the TMJ of horses could be attributable to a difference in cytokine response.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare the recovery rates of Campylobacter fetus subsp venerealis (Cfv) from preputial scrapings of infected bulls with passive filtration on selective medium versus nonselective medium, with and without transport medium.

Samples—217 preputial scrapings from 12 bulls (4 naturally and 8 artificially infected with Cfv).

Procedures—Preputial scrapings were collected in 2 mL of PBS solution and bacteriologically cultured directly on Skirrow medium or passively filtered through 0.65-μm filters onto blood agar, with or without 24 hour preincubation in modified Weybridge transport enrichment medium (TEM). After 72 hours, plates were examined for Cfv and bacterial and fungal contamination or overgrowth.

Results—Passive filtration of fresh preputial scrapings onto blood agar yielded significantly higher recovery rates of Cfv (86%) than direct plating on Skirrow medium (32%), whereas recovery from TEM was poor for both media (35% and 40%, respectively). Skirrow cultures without TEM were significantly more likely to have fungal contamination than were cultures performed with any other technique, and fungal contamination was virtually eliminated by passive filtration onto blood agar. Bacterial contamination by Pseudomonas spp was significantly more common with Skirrow medium versus passive filtration on blood agar, regardless of TEM use.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The use of transport medium and the choice of culture medium had significant effects on Cfv recovery and culture contamination rates from clinical samples. Both factors should be considered when animals are tested for this pathogen.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the prevalence of antibodies against a swine-origin Helicobacter pylori–like organism (HPLO) and H pylori in conventionally reared swine.

Animals—640 conventionally reared swine of various ages from 16 high-health farms in Canada, 20 sows from Ohio, and 35 gnotobiotic swine.

Procedures—Blood was collected from the cranial vena cava. Sera were collected and tested via ELISA for antibodies against antigen prepared from a swine-origin HPLO and human H pylori strain 26695.

Results—Antibodies reactive with a swine HPLO, H pylori, or both were detected in 483 of 640 swine from all 16 farms in western Canada. Seroprevalence varied with age and was low (5.6%) in suckling (≤ 4-week-old) swine and increasingly high in swine ranging from > 4 weeks old to adulthood.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings suggested that colonization by a swine-origin HPLO, H pylori, or both and resultant seroconversion, like that of H pylori infection in humans, were common in commercial swine operations. Furthermore, data indicated that gastric infection was acquired at an early age. The relationships to gastric colonization by HPLOs and clinical manifestations of disease such as gastritis and gastroesophageal ulceration remain to be determined.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The objectives of this study were to investigate scattered radiation doses to the hands of equine workers holding the cassette and the x-ray tube by hand, for both limb and vertebral column studies, and to compare the scattered radiation attenuation of lead with radiation protection lead-free gloves. Radiation doses to the hands of the cassette holder in the primary beam were also investigated.

SAMPLE

A whole-body horse cadaver.

PROCEDURES

A portable x-ray unit was used to simulate 6 radiographic study types in the horse cadaver. Doses were measured with no shielding and, for cassette holders, with the ion chamber enclosed in a lead glove and a lead-free glove. Thirty exposures were performed for each study view and condition (n = 1,920).

RESULTS

Mean scattered doses to x-ray unit operators were higher than doses to cassette holders for ungula (hoof), thoracic vertebrae, and lumbar vertebrae studies, whereas doses to cassette holders were higher than doses to x-ray tube operators for studies of the metacarpophalangeal joint (fetlock) and tarsus (hock). Doses did not differ for the stifle joint. Mean percentage decrease in scattered radiation dose was 99.58% with lead gloves and 98.9% with lead-free gloves.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

X-ray tube operators can be exposed to equal or higher scattered radiation doses to the hand as cassette holders. Lead-free hand shielding should only be considered as an alternative to lead gloves if their lighter weight increases frequency of use by workers.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the radiation safety behaviors of veterinary specialists performing small animal fluoroscopic procedures and examine potential risk factors for these behaviors, including knowledge of radiation risk and training regarding machine operating parameters.

SAMPLE

197 veterinary specialists and residents in training.

PROCEDURES

An electronic questionnaire was distributed to members of the American Colleges of Veterinary Internal Medicine (subspecialties of cardiology and small animal internal medicine), Veterinary Radiology, and Veterinary Surgery.

RESULTS

The overall survey response rate was 6% (240/4,274 email recipients). Of the 240 respondents, 197 (82%) had operated an x-ray unit for a small animal fluoroscopic procedure in the preceding year and fully completed the questionnaire. More than 95% of respondents believed that radiation causes cancer, yet approximately 60% of respondents never wore hand or eye protection during fluoroscopic procedures, and 28% never adjusted the fluoroscopy machine operating parameters for the purpose of reducing their radiation dose. The most common reasons for not wearing eye shielding included no requirement to wear eyeglasses, poor fit, discomfort, and interference of eyeglasses with task performance. Respondents who had received training regarding machine operating parameters adjusted those parameters to reduce their radiation dose during procedures significantly more frequently than did respondents who had not received training.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

On the basis of the self-reported suboptimal radiation safety practices among veterinary fluoroscopy users, we recommend formal incorporation of radiation safety education into residency training programs. All fluoros-copy machine operators should be trained regarding the machine operating parameters that can be adjusted to reduce occupational radiation exposure.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association