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  • Author or Editor: Amara H. Estrada x
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Abstract

Objective—To compare the acute effects of cardiac pacing from various transvenous pacing sites on left ventricular (LV) function and synchrony in clinically normal dogs.

Animals—10 healthy adult mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were anesthetized, and dual-chamber transvenous biventricular pacing systems were implanted. Dogs were paced in single-chamber mode from the right atrial appendage (RAA) alone and in dual-chamber mode from the right ventricular apex (RVA), from the left ventricular free wall (LVFW), and simultaneously from the RVA and LVFW (BiV). Standard ECG and echocardiographic measurements, cardiac output measured with the lithium dilution method (LiDCO), and tissue Doppler–derived measurements of LV synchrony were obtained during each of the pacing configurations.

Results—Placement of the biventricular pacing systems was possible in 8 of the 10 dogs. The QRS duration was significantly different among all pacing sites, and the order of increasing duration was RAA, BiV, LVFW, and RVA. Pacing sites did not differ with respect to fractional shortening; however, pacing from the RVA resulted in a significantly lower ejection fraction than pacing from all other sites. During RVA and LVFW pacing, LiDCO was significantly lower than that at other sites; there was no significant difference between RAA and BiV pacing with respect to LiDCO. Although the degree of dyssynchrony was significantly lower during pacing from the RAA versus other ventricular pacing sites, it was not significantly different among sites.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ventricular activation by RAA pacing provided the best LV function and synchrony. Pacing from the RVA worsened LV function, and although pacing from the LVFW improved it, BiV pacing may provide additional improvement.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of fibroblasts from Doberman Pinschers with and without dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and mutation of the gene for pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isozyme 4 (PDK4) and to evaluate in vitro whether treatment with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (ie, gene therapy) would alter metabolic efficiency.

ANIMALS 10 Doberman Pinschers screened for DCM and PDK4 mutation.

PROCEDURES Fibroblasts were harvested from skin biopsy specimens obtained from Doberman Pinschers, and dogs were classified as without DCM or PDK4 mutation (n = 3) or with occult DCM and heterozygous (4) or homozygous (3) for PDK4 mutation. Fibroblasts were or were not treated with tyrosine mutant AAV type 2 vector containing PDK4 at multiplicities of infection of 1,000. Mitochondrial OCR was measured to evaluate mitochondrial metabolism. The OCR was compared among dog groups and between untreated and treated fibroblasts within groups.

RESULTS Mean ± SD basal OCR of fibroblasts from heterozygous (74 ± 8 pmol of O2/min) and homozygous (58 ± 12 pmol of O2/min) dogs was significantly lower than that for dogs without PDK4 mutation (115 ± 9 pmol of O2/min). After AAV transduction, OCR did not increase significantly in any group (mutation-free group, 121 ± 26 pmol of O2/min; heterozygous group, 88 ± 6 pmol of O2/min; homozygous group, 59 ± 3 pmol of O2/min).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Mitochondrial function was altered in skin fibroblasts of Doberman Pinschers with DCM and PDK4 mutation. Change in mitochondrial function after in vitro gene therapy at the multiplicities of infection used in this study was not significant. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:156–161)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare procedure times and major and minor complication rates associated with single-chamber versus dual-chamber pacemaker implantation and with 1-lead, 2-lead, and 3-lead pacemaker implantation in dogs with clinical signs of bradyarrhythmia.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—54 dogs that underwent pacemaker implantation because of clinical signs of bradyarrhythmia.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs that received pacemakers between July 2004 and December 2009 were reviewed for information regarding signalment, diagnosis, pacemaker implantation, pacemaker type, complications, and survival time. Analyses were performed to determine significant differences in anesthesia time, procedure time, and outcome for dogs on the basis of pacing mode and number of pacing leads.

Results—28 of 54 (51.9%) dogs received single-chamber pacemakers and 26 (48.1%) received dual-chamber pacemakers. Mean ± SD procedural time was significantly longer for patients with dual-chamber pacemakers (133.5 ± 51.3 minutes) than for patients with single-chamber pacemakers (94.9 ± 37.0 minutes), and procedure time increased significantly as the number of leads increased (1 lead, 102.3 ± 51.1 minutes; 2 leads, 114.9 ± 24.8 minutes; 3 leads, 158.2 ± 8.5 minutes). Rates of major and minor complications were not significantly different between dogs that received single-chamber pacemakers and those that received dual-chamber pacemakers or among dogs grouped on the basis of the number of pacing leads placed.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although dual-chamber pacemaker implantation did result in increased procedural and anesthesia times, compared with single-chamber pacemaker implantation, this did not result in a higher complication rate.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 19-year-old Thoroughbred mare was evaluated at 265 days of gestation with a markedly distended abdomen and edema of the ventral portion of the abdomen.

Clinical Findings—The uterus was distended over the pelvic rim, making transrectal palpation of the fetus impossible. Transabdominal ultrasonography revealed excessive amounts of fetal fluid. Results of analysis of fluid obtained via amnio- and allantocentesis confirmed that the amniotic cavity was large.

Treatment and Outcome—The mare was monitored for signs of weakness of the prepubic tendon and abdominal wall. The fetus and placenta were monitored for signs of stress and pending abortion. Flunixin meglumine and altrenogest were administered to the mare. Parturition was attended and occurred at 321 days' gestation. Postpartum complications in the mare included hypovolemic shock and cardiac arrhythmias. Both conditions were treated, and the mare recovered. The foal was considered small, had bilateral angular limb deformities, and was unable to nurse. The foal was given plasma for failure of passive transfer of immunity. Ten months later, the foal underwent procedures to correct limb deformities.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hydrops conditions are rare in horses, with hydrops allantois occurring more frequently than hydrops amnion; reportedly result in fetal or neonatal death; and may result in death of or injury to the mare. Close monitoring of maternal and fetal health in combination with supportive treatment of the mare can result in the safe progression of a hydrops pregnancy and the birth of a live foal.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association