Search Results

You are looking at 111 - 120 of 166 items for

  • Author or Editor: Philip H. Kass x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To compare the feasibility of training veterinary medicine students to perform laparoscopic versus conventional open ovariectomy in live dogs.

Design—Randomized prospective parallel-group experiment.

Population—25 students completing the second year of their veterinary curriculum.

Procedures—Students were randomly assigned to 2 groups to receive 14 hours of specific training in either open ovariectomy (n = 13) or laparoscopic ovariectomy (12). Confidence, basic surgical skills, and basic laparoscopic skills were evaluated before and after training, prior to live surgical procedures.

Results—Scores related to basic surgical skills were high in both groups and did not improve with either training program. Before live animal surgeries, student confidence and basic laparoscopic skills improved after training in laparoscopic ovariectomy and were higher than after training in open ovariectomy. Surgery time was higher for the students who received training in laparoscopic ovariectomy (129 minutes; range, 84 to 143 minutes), compared with students who received training in open ovariectomy (80 minutes; range, 62 to 117 minutes). On a 55-point scoring system, ovariectomy scores were similar between students who received training in open ovariectomy (34.5; range, 16.5 to 45) and students who received training in laparoscopic ovariectomy (34.5; range, 25 to 44.5).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The training programs were effective in improving student confidence and skills in laparoscopic ovariectomy. Results of this study suggested that veterinary medical students, with assistance from an instructor, may be taught to perform laparoscopic ovariectomies with performance equivalent to that for students performing open ovariectomies.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine total dietary fiber (TDF) composition of feline diets used for management of obesity and diabetes mellitus.

Design—Cross-sectional survey.

Sample—Dry veterinary (n = 10), canned veterinary (12), and canned over-the-counter (3) feline diets.

Procedures—Percentage of TDF as insoluble dietary fiber (IDF), high-molecular-weight soluble dietary fiber (HMWSDF), and low-molecular-weight soluble dietary fiber (LMWSDF) was determined.

Results—Median measured TDF concentration was greater than reported maximum crude fiber content in dry and canned diets. Median TDF (dry-matter) concentration in dry and canned diets was 12.2% (range, 8.11% to 27.16%) and 13.8% (range, 4.7% to 27.9%), respectively. Dry and canned diets, and diets with and without a source of oligosaccharides in the ingredient list, were not different in energy density or concentrations of TDF, IDF, HMWSDF, or LMWSDF. Similarly, loaf-type (n = 11) and gravy-type (4) canned diets differed only in LMWSDF concentration. Disparities in TDF concentrations among products existed despite a lack of differences among groups. Limited differences in TDF concentration and dietary fiber composition were detected when diets were compared on the basis of carbohydrate concentration. Diets labeled for management of obesity were higher in TDF concentration and lower in energy density than diets for management of diabetes mellitus.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Diets provided a range of TDF concentrations with variable concentrations of IDF, HMWSDF, and LMWSDF. Crude fiber concentration was not a reliable indicator of TDF concentration or dietary fiber composition. Because carbohydrate content is calculated as a difference, results suggested that use of crude fiber content would cause overestimation of both carbohydrate and energy content of diets.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the exposure obtained for minimally invasive abdominal organ biopsy (MIOB) from 3 access incisions in cats.

Design—Prospective experimental study and clinical case series.

Animals—6 purpose-bred research cats and 6 feline clinical patients with indications for abdominal organ biopsy.

Procedures—Three 3-cm incisions into the peritoneal cavity were created at different locations along the linea alba in research cats in randomized order. A wound retraction device was inserted in each incision. Ability to exteriorize various abdominal organs to the extent required to reasonably perform a surgical biopsy was recorded, and results were compared among incision sites. On the basis of results obtained, the access incision that provided exposure of the most frequently biopsied abdominal organs was used to perform MIOB in 6 feline clinical patients with various underlying pathological conditions.

Results—On the basis of experiments with research cats, a 3-cm access incision centered midway between the caudal margin of the xiphoid cartilage and the umbilicus was found to provide access for MIOB for most organs. In 5 of 6 clinical patients, all of the organs of interest were biopsied successfully via this incision location, although access to all hepatic lobes and all parts of the pancreas was inconsistent. In 1 cat, conversion to an open approach was performed because a palpable mass was detected in the area of the duodenocolic ligament.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Optimization of access incision location for MIOB allowed biopsy specimen collection from organs of interest to be performed in a minimally invasive manner in cats.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate signalment, clinical signs, treatment, and factors affecting visual prognosis in dogs with uveodermatologic syndrome (UDS).

DESIGN Retrospective case series and nested cohort study.

ANIMALS 50 dogs (37 Akitas and 13 non-Akitas) with UDS evaluated at 4 ophthalmology practices.

PROCEDURES Data were collected from the medical records regarding signalment, clinical signs, biopsy results, medications, adverse effects, vision and glaucoma status at initial and subsequent examinations, and duration of follow-up. Various factors were examined for associations with development of blindness or glaucoma following initial examination.

RESULTS The most common ophthalmic signs included aqueous flare (n = 35 [70%]), iris abnormalities (29 [58%]), retinal detachment (23 [46%]), and choroidal depigmentation or chorioretinal infiltrates (10 [20%]). At initial examination, 36% (18/50) of dogs had glaucoma and 57% (26/46) were blind in both eyes. Twenty-five (50%) dogs had vision at their final visit, representing 78% of the 32 dogs that had vision at initial examination or regained vision during the follow-up period. In dogs that lost vision, median time to permanent blindness in both eyes was 13.5 months (range, 0.4 to 59 months) after initial examination. No significant associations with time to glaucoma or vision loss were identified for signalment variables, specific medications, or duration of clinical signs prior to initial examination.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE UDS commonly resulted in glaucoma, vision loss, or both in affected dogs. No evaluated factor was associated with visual prognosis; however, a subset of patients maintained vision through to the final recheck examination.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of and risk factors for ophthalmic disease in leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) evaluated at a veterinary teaching hospital.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 112 of 144 (78%) leopard geckos that were evaluated at a veterinary teaching hospital in January 1985 through October 2013 and for which sufficient medical record information was available.

PROCEDURES Information from medical records was used to identify leopard geckos with ophthalmic disease, characterize cases, and determine risk factors for the presence of ophthalmic disease.

RESULTS Of the 112 leopard geckos, 52 (46%) had ophthalmic disease (mainly corneal or conjunctival disease). Female geckos were less likely to have ophthalmic disease, and there was a positive association between increasing age and ophthalmic disease. Use of a paper towel substrate, absence of any heat source, and lack of vitamin A supplementation were positively associated with a diagnosis of ophthalmic disease. Head dysecdysis was the only concurrent disorder significantly associated with ophthalmic disease. At necropsy, 5 affected leopard geckos had squamous metaplasia of the conjunctivae.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that ophthalmic disease is a common finding in leopard geckos. The cause of ocular surface disease in leopard geckos may be multifactorial, and hypovitaminosis A may be an important risk factor. Although animals receiving supplemental vitamin A were less likely to have ophthalmic disease, further understanding is required regarding the metabolism of and nutritional requirements for vitamin A in leopard geckos.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare efficacy between cyclosporine and prednisone for treatment of primary immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA) in dogs.

DESIGN Randomized controlled clinical trial.

ANIMALS 20 client-owned dogs with primary IMPA.

PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive prednisone (starting at 1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h; n = 10) or cyclosporine (5 mg/kg [2.3 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h; 10) for 90 days. Cyclosporine-treated dogs also received carprofen, tramadol, or both for the first 7 days for analgesia. Data collection, physical examination, and cytologic analysis of synovial fluid samples were performed on days 0, 14, 45, and 90. Trough whole blood cyclosporine concentrations were determined on days 7 to 17 for cyclosporine-treated dogs. Treatment failure was defined as lack of clinical improvement by day 14, lack of cytologic improvement by day 45, or need to change treatment because of adverse effects.

RESULTS Treatment was successful for 7 prednisone-treated dogs and 7 cyclosporine-treated dogs. Absence of synovial fluid cytologic abnormalities on day 45 was identified for 5 prednisone-treated dogs and 8 cyclosporine-treated dogs. Prednisone-treated dogs were more likely to develop polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia than were cyclosporine-treated dogs. Opportunistic infections (ie, demodicosis or Erysipelothrix bacteremia) were identified in 2 cyclosporine-treated dogs and 0 prednisone-treated dogs, and diarrhea developed in 1 cyclosporine-treated dog, requiring treatment discontinuation.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Although the number of dogs evaluated was small, limiting generalizability, results of this study suggested that cyclosporine offers promise as a suitable alternative to prednisone for treatment of IMPA in dogs.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine total dietary fiber (TDF) concentration and composition of commercial diets used for management of obesity, diabetes mellitus, and dietary fat-responsive disease in dogs.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Sample—Dry (n = 11) and canned (8) canine therapeutic diets.

Procedures—Insoluble and soluble dietary fiber (IDF and SDF), high-molecular-weight SDF (HMWSDF), and low-molecular-weight SDF (LMWSDF) concentrations were determined. Variables were compared among diets categorized by product guide indication, formulation (dry vs canned), and regulatory criteria for light and low-fat diets.

Results—SDF (HMWSDF and LMWSDF) comprised a median of 30.4% (range, 9.4% to 53.7%) of TDF; LMWSDF contributed a median of 11.5% (range, 2.7% to 33.8%) of TDF. Diets for diabetes management had higher concentrations of IDF and TDF with lower proportions of SDF and LMWSDF contributing to TDF, compared with diets for treatment of fat-responsive disease. Fiber concentrations varied within diet categories and between canned and dry versions of the same diet (same name and manufacturer) for all pairs evaluated. Diets classified as light contained higher TDF and IDF concentrations than did non-light diets. All canned diets were classified as low fat, despite providing up to 38% of calories as fat.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Diets provided a range of TDF concentrations and compositions; veterinarians should request TDF data from manufacturers, if not otherwise available. Consistent responses to dry and canned versions of the same diet cannot necessarily be expected, and diets with the same indications may not perform similarly. Many diets may not provide adequate fat restriction for treatment of dietary fat-responsive disease.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome of positive-pressure ventilation (PPV) for 24 hours or longer and identify factors associated with successful weaning from PPV and survival to hospital discharge in dogs and cats.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—124 dogs and 24 cats that received PPV for 24 hours or longer.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for signalment, primary diagnosis, reason for initiating PPV, measures of oxygenation and ventilation before and during PPV, ventilator settings, complications, duration of PPV, and outcome. Animals were categorized into 1 of 3 groups on the basis of the reason for PPV.

Results—Group 1 patients received PPV for inadequate oxygenation (67 dogs and 6 cats), group 2 for inadequate ventilation (46 dogs and 16 cats), and group 3 for inadequate oxygenation and ventilation (11 dogs and 2 cats). Of the group 1 animals, 36% (26/73) were weaned from PPV and 22% (16/73) survived to hospital discharge. In group 2, 50% (31/62) were weaned from PPV and 39% (24/62) survived to hospital discharge. In group 3, 3 of 13 were weaned from PPV and 1 of 13 survived to hospital discharge. Likelihood of successful weaning and survival to hospital discharge were significantly higher for group 2 animals, and cats had a significantly lower likelihood of successful weaning from PPV, compared with dogs. Median duration of PPV was 48 hours (range, 24 to 356 hours) and was not as-sociated with outcome.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that long-term PPV is practical and successful in dogs and cats.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine dispersion uniformity and stability of meloxicam and carprofen in extemporaneous preparations stored for 28 days.

Design—Prospective study.

Sample Population—Meloxicam and carprofen (commercial formulations) were compounded (day 0) with deionized water (DW), 1% methylcellulose gel (MCG), MCG and simple syrup (SS; 1:1 mixture), or a suspending and flavoring vehicle combination (SFVC; 1:1 mixture) to nominal drug concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/mL and 1.25, 2.5, or 5.0 mg/mL, respectively.

Procedures—Preparations were stored at approximately 4°C (39.2°F) or 22°C (71.6°F). For each preparation, drug concentrations were determined and drug stability was evaluated at intervals during storage; on days 0 and 28, pH values were measured and bacterial cultures were initiated.

Results—In meloxicam-DW, meloxicam-MCG (0.25 mg/mL), and meloxicam-MCG (0.5 mg/mL) preparations, drug distribution was uniform (coefficient of variation < 10%); > 90% of the original drug concentration was maintained for 28 days. Despite uniform drug distribution of the carprofen-SFVC preparations, most retained ≥ 90% of the original drug concentration for only 21 days. Use of the MCG-SS combination resulted in foamy preparations of unacceptable variability. After 28 days, pH decreased slightly in meloxicam-DW and meloxicam-MCG preparations (0.17 ± 0.04 and 0.21 ± 0.04, respectively). Carprofen-SFVC (2.5 mg/mL) and carprofen-MCG-SS (5.0 mg/mL) preparations stored at 22°C for 28 days yielded bacterial growth.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—DW, MCG, and the SFVC can be used successfully for extemporaneous preparation of meloxicam and carprofen for administration to small exotic animals. Refrigeration is recommended for preparations of meloxicam-DW and carprofen-SFVC.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare associations between vaccine types and other injectable drugs with development of injection-site sarcomas in cats.

Design—Case-control study.

Animals—181 cats with soft tissue sarcomas (cases), 96 cats with tumors at non-vaccine regions (control group I), and 159 cats with basal cell tumors (control group II).

Procedures—Subjects were prospectively obtained from a large pathology database. Demographic, sarcoma location, basal cell tumor, and vaccine and other injectable history data were documented by use of a questionnaire and used to define case, control, and exposure status. Three control groups were included: cats with sarcomas at non-vaccine sites, cats with basal cell tumors, and a combined group of cats with sarcomas at non-vaccine sites and cats with basal cell tumors. χ2 tests, marginal homogeneity tests, and exact logistic regression were performed.

Results—In the broad interscapular region, the frequency of administration of long-acting corticosteroid injections (dexamethasone, methylprednisolone, and triamcinolone) was significantly higher in cases than in controls. In the broad rear limb region, case cats were significantly less likely to have received recombinant vaccines than inactivated vaccines; ORs from logistic regression analyses equaled 0.1, with 95% confidence intervals ranging from 0 to 0.4 and 0 to 0.7, depending on control group and time period of exposure used.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—This case-control study measuring temporal and spatial exposures efficiently detected associations between administrations of various types of vaccines (recombinant vs inactivated rabies) and other injectable products (ie, long-acting corticosteroids) with sarcoma development without the need to directly measure incidence. These findings nevertheless also indicated that no vaccines were risk free. The study is informative in allowing practitioners to weigh the relative merits and risks of commonly used pharmaceutical products.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association