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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The goal of this study was to determine plasma, urine, and synovial fluid concentrations and describe the effects on biomarkers of cartilage toxicity following intra-articular dexmedetomidine administration to horses.

ANIMALS

12 research horses.

PROCEDURES

Horses received a single intra-articular administration of 1 μg/kg or 5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine or saline. Plasma, urine, and synovial fluid were collected prior to and up to 48 hours postadministration, and concentrations were determined. The effects on CS846 and C2C were determined in synovial fluid at 0, 12, and 24 hours postadministration using immunoassays.

RESULTS

Plasma concentrations of dexmedetomidine fell below the limit of quantification (LOQ) (0.005 ng/mL) by 2.5 and 8 hours postadministration of 1 and 5 μg/kg, respectively. Synovial fluid concentrations were above the LOQ (0.1 ng/mL) of the assay at 24 hours in both dose groups. Drug was not detected in urine samples at any time postdrug administration. CS846 concentrations were significantly decreased relative to baseline at 12 hours postadministration in the saline group and significantly increased in the 5-μg/kg-dose group at 24 hours. Concentrations of C2C were significantly decreased at 12 and 24 hours postadministration in the saline treatment group. There were no significant differences in CS846 or C2C concentrations between dose groups at any time.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Systemic concentrations of dexmedetomidine remained low, compared to synovial fluid concentrations. CS846, a marker of articular cartilage synthesis, increased in a dose-dependent fashion. Based on these findings, further dose titration and investigation of analgesic and adverse effects are warranted.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of terbinafine administered to western pond turtles (Actinemys marmorata) via oral gavage and bioencapsulated in earthworms.

ANIMALS

7 western pond turtles.

PROCEDURES

A randomized complete crossover single-dose pharmacokinetic study was performed. Compounded terbinafine (25 mg/mL; 30 mg/kg) was administered through oral gavage (OG) directly into the stomach or bioencapsulated (BEC) into an earthworm vehicle. Blood (0.2 mL) was drawn from the jugular vein at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 120 hours after administration. Plasma terbinafine levels were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography.

RESULTS

Peak plasma terbinafine concentrations of 786.9 ± 911 ng/mL and 1,022.2 ± 911 were measured at 1.8 ± 2.8 and 14.1 ± 12.3 hours after OG and BEC administration, respectively. There was a significant (P = .031) increase in area under the curve with BEC compared to OG. Using steady-state predictions, with once-daily terbinafine administration, 3/7 and 7/7 turtles had plasma concentrations persistently greater than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Emydomyces testavorans for the OG and BEC administration routes of administration, respectively. With administration every 48 hours, 3/7 turtles for the OG phase and 6/7 turtles for the BEC phase had concentrations greater than the E. testavorans MIC throughout the entire dosing interval.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Administration of terbinafine (30 mg/kg) every 24 or 48 hours via earthworm bioencapsulation in western pond turtles may be appropriate for the treatment of shell lesions caused by E. testavorans. Clinical studies are needed to assess the efficacy of treatment.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Longevity and herd turnover rate are becoming common topics of discussion as the dairy industry strives for continuous improvement in efficiency, profitability, animal welfare, and environmental sustainability. Having the most productive animal fill each slot on a dairy makes strategic replacement and the resulting herd turnover an important tool for producers. Dairy operations can be considered to have slots available to be occupied by cows. The number of slots available is governed by dairy characteristics including parlor size and facility design. With sustainability and profitability goals, producers should aim to fill each slot with the most productive animal. The advantages of a modest surplus of replacement heifers allowing for a higher herd turnover rate are examined and shown to improve herd profitability, enhance welfare, and reduce environmental impact. A model assuming constant demand for dairy foods is presented with increased herd turnover rate leading to more milk production per cow and reduced enteric methane emissions. This analysis demonstrates that all else being equal, raising more replacements (having a relatively higher herd turnover rate and decreased herd-level longevity) improves sustainability compared to management aimed at lower herd turnover rates. Understanding the drivers of herd turnover in dairy production has important implications for the components of one health: animal well-being, food production, and environmental stewardship. The present work examines one tool toward this goal, while the companion Currents in One Health by Nguyen et al, JAVMA, January 2023, takes a broader view of many aspects of dairy sustainability.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the efficiency and safety of a doramectin-based treatment protocol in dogs affected by intraspinal spirocercosis (Spirocerca lupi).

ANIMALS

Client-owned dogs that were admitted to a veterinary hospital during 2021 to 2022 with acute onset of neurological signs and diagnosed with intraspinal spirocercosis. All dogs underwent complete neurological evaluation, CSF analysis, PCR confirmation of CNS S lupi infection, and follow-up evaluation of at least 6 months.

PROCEDURES

Upon diagnosis, dogs were treated with doramectin at a dose of 400 μg/kg, SC, q 24 h for 3 consecutive days, followed by the same dose once a week for 6 weeks. Prednisone was administered at a dose of 1 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h and tapered every 3 days. Antimicrobial clindamycin was administered at a dose of 12.5 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h for 7 days to reduce the risk of secondary spinal cord infection. Short- and long-term outcomes (1 week to 56 months) were recorded.

RESULTS

8 dogs fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 7 of which presented with neurological deficits and 1 with cervical pain. Initiation of treatment was associated with stopping the deterioration in 7 of 8 dogs. Seven dogs improved and 6 recovered ambulation. One dog was euthanized due to lack of improvement. Six of the recovered dogs were still ataxic on the last follow-up examination at 6 to 56 months. No adverse effects of the drug were noted.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Frequent administration of doramectin was found to be safe and effective in preventing neurological deterioration in dogs with intraspinal spirocercosis.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Rabies is the deadliest viral infection known, with no reliable treatment, and although it is entirely preventable, rabies continues to kill more than 60,000 people every year, mostly children in countries where dog rabies is endemic. America is only 1 generation away from the time when rabies killed more than 10,000 animals and 50 Americans every year, but 3 to 5 Americans continue to die annually from rabies. Distressingly, > 50,000 Americans undergo rabies prevention therapy every year after exposure to potentially rabid animals. While enormous progress has been made, more must be done to defeat this ancient but persistent, fatal zoonosis.

In the US, lack of public awareness and ambivalence are the greatest dangers imposed by rabies, resulting in unnecessary exposures, anxiety, and risk. Veterinarians have a special role in informing and reassuring the public about prevention and protection from rabies. This summary of current facts and future advances about rabies will assist veterinarians in informing their clients about the disease.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report history, clinical examination findings, clinicopathologic findings, diagnostic test results, treatment, and outcome in horses with a novel idiopathic hepatitis syndrome.

ANIMALS

13 client-owned horses.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of horses that were presented with fever and increased blood liver enzyme activity over a 16-month period were reviewed (December 1, 2020, to April 1, 2022). Collected data included signalment, history, clinical and clinicopathologic findings, diagnostic test results, treatment, clinical progression, and short-term outcome.

RESULTS

Affected horses were presented between December and April of each of the 2 seasons investigated. The majority of horses developed cyclic fevers over the course of 3 weeks, during which time histologic evidence of hepatitis was observed. Histologic lesions included hepatic necrosis, neutrophilic to lymphohistiocytic inflammation, biliary epithelial injury, and portal fibrosis. Systemic inflammation was evidenced by increased serum amyloid A concentration and leukon changes. No horse developed signs of hepatic insufficiency, and all horses clinically recovered. Return of serum activity of GGT to within the reference range occurred within 16 weeks in most horses. Histologic lesions remained evident up to 27 weeks after initial presentation in 1 horse.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Although an etiologic agent has not been identified, an apparently seasonal equine hepatitis syndrome was characterized by fever, systemic inflammation, increased liver enzyme activity, and histologic evidence of hepatitis. An infectious cause is suspected on the basis of histology and outcome.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association