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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

The third article of this 4-part series discusses drug therapy in cats by therapeutic category. Specifically, the use of drugs to control infections, pain, fever, inflammation, cancer, and selected parasites is described. In addition, the use of hormonally related drugs and selected miscellaneous drugs in cats is addressed. Drugs emphasized are those for which use in cats is frequently associated with adverse reactions or drugs for which use is limited to illnesses that tend to be unique in cats.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

In the second part of this 4-part series, drug therapy in cats is discussed by use of a systems approach. Specifically, drugs that can be used safely for treatment of disorders affecting the feline gastrointestinal, central nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, and urogenital systems are described. Many drugs that are used in dogs can be safely used in cats according to the same or similar dosing regimens. Several drugs that have traditionally been considered inappropriate (eg, morphine derivatives, primidone) can probably also be used, if cautiously, in cats. In contrast, use of several drugs that are safely used in other species should be avoided in cats (eg, selected emetics and antiemetics, phosphate salt enemas, and selected urinary antiseptics). Cats are more sensitive than dogs to the adverse side effects of a variety of drugs (eg, aspirin, digoxin, selected antiarrhythmics), and extra precautions must be taken when these drugs are used in cats. Finally, several drugs are used for the treatment of illnesses that tend to be unique to cats (eg, taurine and calcium-channel blockers in selected feline cardiovascular disorders).

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

This is the first of a 4-part series concerning drug therapy in cats. In this article, factors that may increase the incidence of type-A adverse drug reactions in cats are discussed. Factors related to species and age differences, drug interactions, and the effects of disease are emphasized. Those that tend to be unique to cats, such as species-induced differences in drug disposition, are described in detail when sufficient information was available from the literature. General recommendations regarding drug administration are made, which will facilitate the implementation of rational drug therapy in cats, thus reducing the incidence of adverse reactions.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association