Browse

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 146 items for :

  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the effects of morphine-lidocaine-ketamine (MLK) and fentanyl-lidocaine-ketamine (FLK) combinations administered as constant rate infusions (CRIs) during and after veterinary procedures on postprocedure rectal temperature in dogs.

ANIMALS

32 clinically normal client-owned dogs undergoing nonemergent procedures.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were randomly assigned to receive an MLK or FLK combination (16 dogs/group). During the procedure, each dog received 2% lidocaine hydrochloride (1 mg/kg/h; both groups), ketamine hydrochloride (0.6 mg/kg/h; both groups), and morphine (0.36 mg/kg/h; MLK group) or fentanyl (4 μg/kg/h; FLK group) via CRI for analgesia; esophageal temperature was maintained at 37° to 39°C. At extubation, each drug dose in each assigned combination was halved and administered (via CRI) for 12 additional hours for postprocedure analgesia. Rectal temperature and other data were recorded at baseline (prior to administration of premedicants), extubation (0 hours), and 0.5, 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 hours thereafter.

RESULTS

Mean postprocedure rectal temperature was significantly lower at each postextubation time point for the MLK group, compared with corresponding values for the FLK group. Compared with the baseline value, mean postprocedure rectal temperature was significantly lower at 0, 0.5, 1.5, and 3 hours for the FLK group and at all postprocedure time points for the MLK group. Hypothermia (rectal temperature < 37°C) was detected at ≥ 1 postprocedure time point more often in dogs in the MLK group (9/16) than in the FLK group (1/16).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Dogs that received an MLK combination for analgesia during and after a veterinary procedure developed hypothermia more commonly than did dogs that received an FLK combination under similar conditions.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the sedative and cardiorespiratory effects of IM administration of alfaxalone and butorphanol combined with acepromazine, midazolam, or dexmedetomidine in dogs.

ANIMALS

6 young healthy mixed-breed hounds.

PROCEDURES

Dogs received each of 3 treatments (alfaxalone [2 mg/kg] and butorphanol [0.4 mg/kg] combined with acepromazine [0.02 mg/kg; AB-ace], midazolam [0.2 mg/kg; AB-mid], or dexmedetomidine [0.005 mg/kg; AB-dex], IM) in a blinded, randomized crossover-design study with a 1-week washout period between treatments. Sedation scores and cardiorespiratory variables were recorded at predetermined time points. Data were analyzed by use of mixed-model ANOVA and linear generalized estimating equations with post hoc adjustments.

RESULTS

All treatments resulted in moderate to deep sedation (median score, ≥ 15/21) ≤ 5 minutes after injection. Sedation scores did not differ among treatments until the 40-minute time point, when the score was higher for AB-dex than for other treatments. Administration of AB-dex resulted in median scores reflecting deep sedation until 130 minutes, versus 80 and 60 minutes for AB-ace and AB-mid, respectively, after injection. Heart rate, cardiac output, and oxygen delivery decreased significantly after AB-dex, but not AB-ace or AB-mid administration. Respiratory variables remained within clinically acceptable ranges after all treatments. Undesirable recovery characteristics were observed in 4 dogs after AB-mid treatment. Four dogs required atipamezole administration 180 minutes after AB-dex injection.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

All protocols produced reliable sedation. The results indicated that in young, healthy dogs, AB-mid may produce undesirable recovery characteristics; AB-dex treatment caused cardiovascular depression and should be used with caution.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate effects of body condition on permeability of intestinal mucosa in horses.

ANIMALS

13 horses (7 obese and 6 lean) from 8 to 15 years of age.

PROCEDURES

Body condition score was assessed, and an oral sugar test (OST) was performed to evaluate glucose and insulin dynamics. Horses were allowed a 2-week diet acclimation period and were then euthanized. Tissue samples were collected from the jejunum, ileum, cecum, pelvic flexure, right dorsal colon, and rectum. Mucosal permeability was assessed by measuring transepithelial resistance and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) flux across tissue samples mounted in Ussing chambers.

RESULTS

5 obese horses and 1 lean horse had evidence of insulin dysregulation, whereas 1 obese and 5 lean horses had no abnormalities in results of the OST. Results for the OST were not available for 1 obese horse. Mucosal transepithelial resistance did not differ in any intestinal segment between obese and lean horses. Obese horses had a significantly higher LPS flux across jejunal mucosa, compared with results for lean horses, but there were no significant differences between obese and lean horses for other intestinal segments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Obese horses may have had greater paracellular mucosal permeability of jejunal mucosa to LPS, compared with that for lean horses. This finding was consistent with data for the gastrointestinal mucosa of humans and mice and supported the hypothesis that obese horses may be at higher risk from chronic exposure to increased amounts of LPS, compared with the risk for lean horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the impact of mechanical ventilation (MV) and perfusion conditions on the efficacy of pulse-delivered inhaled nitric oxide (PiNO) in anesthetized horses.

ANIMALS 27 healthy adult horses.

PROCEDURES Anesthetized horses were allocated into 4 groups: spontaneous breathing (SB) with low (< 70 mm Hg) mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; group SB-L; n = 7), SB with physiologically normal (≥ 70 mm Hg) MAP (group SB-N; 8), MV with low MAP (group MV-L; 6), and MV with physiologically normal MAP (group MV-N; 6). Dobutamine was used to maintain MAP > 70 mm Hg. Data were collected after a 60-minute equilibration period and at 15 and 30 minutes during PiNO administration. Variables included Pao 2, arterial oxygen saturation and content, oxygen delivery, and physiologic dead space-to-tidal volume ratio. Data were analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk, Mann-Whitney U, and Friedman ANOVA tests.

RESULTS Pao 2, arterial oxygen saturation, arterial oxygen content, and oxygen delivery increased significantly with PiNO in the SB-L, SB-N, and MV-N groups; were significantly lower in group MV-L than in group MV-N; and were lower in MV-N than in both SB groups during PiNO. Physiologic dead space-to-tidal volume ratio was highest in the MV-L group.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Pulmonary perfusion impacted PiNO efficacy during MV but not during SB. Use of PiNO failed to increase oxygenation in the MV-L group, likely because of profound ventilation-perfusion mismatching. During SB, PiNO improved oxygenation irrespective of the magnitude of blood flow, but hypoventilation and hypercarbia persisted. Use of PiNO was most effective in horses with adequate perfusion.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether the lactate threshold of dogs could be determined by a visual method and to assess the extent of agreement and bias among treadmill velocities for the lactate threshold as determined by visual (LTv) and polynomial (LTp) methods, glucose threshold as determined by visual (GTv) and polynomial (GTp) methods, and heart rate deflection point (HRdp) as a method for estimating the aerobic capacity of dogs.

ANIMALS 18 healthy adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES Each dog underwent a standardized incremental treadmill exercise test once. The test ended when the dog began to show signs of fatigue. Plasma lactate and glucose concentrations and heart rate (HR) were plotted against exercise intensity (treadmill velocity) for the duration of the test, and the LTv, GTv, and HRdp were determined visually. The LTp and GTp were determined by means of a second-order polynomial function. One-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation, Bland-Altman analyses, and ordinary least products regression were used to assess the extent of agreement and bias among the various threshold velocities.

RESULTS Mean velocity did not differ significantly among the thresholds evaluated. There was a strong positive correlation between the LTv velocity and the velocity for GTv (r = 0.91), LTp (r = 0.96), GTp (r = 0.94), and HRdp (r = 0.95).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that LTv could be determined for dogs undergoing intense exercise on a treadmill, and the treadmill velocity corresponding to the LTv was associated with the velocity for the other hallmarks of endurance. Thus, that method may be useful for prescription and evaluation of conditioning programs for dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of dipyrone to control pyrexia in horses with naturally occurring disease under field conditions.

ANIMALS 138 horses with pyrexia and various infections evaluated at 14 veterinary sites in 12 states.

PROCEDURES In the first (effectiveness) phase of this 2-phase study, horses were randomly assigned 3:1 to receive 1 dose of dipyrone (30 mg/kg [13.6 mg/lb], IV) or an equivalent amount of placebo. Effectiveness was defined as a decrease in rectal temperature ≥ 1.1°C (2°F), compared with the pretreatment value, or a rectal temperature of ≤ 38.3°C (101.0°F) 6 hours after treatment administration. Horses deemed to have an appropriate reduction in rectal temperature (regardless of treatment group) by 6 hours were immediately entered into the safety phase of the study, in which dipyrone was administered IV at 30 mg/kg between 0 and 8 times up to every 8 hours on an as-needed basis, as determined by the clinical investigators. Horses were monitored throughout for adverse events.

RESULTS A significantly greater proportion of dipyrone-treated horses (76/99 [77%]) had an effective treatment response than did placebo-treated horses (6/31 [19%]). Posttreatment adverse events were mild and transient. No differences in types or prevalence of gastrointestinal adverse events were evident between treatment groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Dipyrone was effective in controlling pyrexia by 6 hours after IV administration of a single 30-mg/kg dose in a large proportion of treated horses. Adverse effects were minimal.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on type VII collagen– cleaving matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the lamellar tissue of extracorporeally perfused equine limbs.

SAMPLE 10 right forelimbs and 3 left forelimbs collected from 10 adult horses after slaughter at a licensed abattoir.

PROCEDURES Extracorporeal perfusion of the isolated equine limbs was performed for 10 hours under physiologic conditions (control-perfused limbs; n = 5) and with the addition of 80 ng of LPS/L of perfusate (LPS-perfused limbs; 5). Lamellar tissue specimens were then collected from the dorsal aspect of the hooves. Additionally, corresponding control specimens were collected from the 3 nonperfused left forelimbs. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue blocks with antibodies against total (latent and active) MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-8, and MMP-9 as well as antibody against active MMP-9. Intensity of immunohistochemical staining was scored, and stain distribution in the lamellar tissue was noted.

RESULTS Staining intensity of total and active MMP-9 was significantly increased in LPS-perfused versus control-perfused limbs. No such difference was identified for MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-8.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Of the 4 MMPs that are capable of degrading type VII collagen, MMP-9 was the only one for which production increased in the lamellar tissue of isolated equine limbs perfused with versus without a clinically relevant concentration of LPS. These results suggested that MMP-9 may be involved in initiation of pathological changes in lamellar tissue in endotoxin-induced laminitis, whereas MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-8 may be less relevant.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare dialysate sodium concentration and patient plasma sodium concentration of dogs during intermittent hemodialysis treatments.

SAMPLE 211 intermittent hemodialysis treatments performed on 40 client-owned dogs for the management of dialysis-dependent uremia.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed to determine the plasma sodium concentration of each dog before and after routine hemodialysis treatments. Associations between detected changes in plasma sodium concentration and dialysate sodium concentration were evaluated by use of Spearman rank correlations and linear regression analysis.

RESULTS Significant linear correlations were found between the dialysate sodium concentration and patient sodium concentration. The starting dialysate-to-patient sodium gradient was associated with the strongest correlation to the change in patient sodium concentration at the end of the dialysis session. Modest correlations existed between the dialysate sodium concentration and postdialysis patient sodium concentration as well as between the predialysis dialysate-to-patient sodium gradient and postdialysis dialysate-to-patient sodium gradient.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The dialysate sodium concentration was correlated with the patient sodium concentration in dogs, and the dialysate-to-patient sodium gradient could be used to further refine this association to predict the postdialysis patient sodium concentration and potentially manage dysnatremia during hemodialysis. Prospective studies should be performed to determine how these associations can be used to correct aberrations as well as to avoid unwanted alterations in patient sodium concentrations.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of meloxicam on movement, feeding, and drinking behaviors of transported and nontransported cattle.

ANIMALS 100 crossbred beef steers.

PROCEDURES During experiment 1 of a 2-experiment study, calves from a livestock auction received meloxicam (1 mg/kg, PO; n = 50) or a lactose placebo (1 capsule/calf; 50; control), then calves were transported approximately 1,000 km overnight to a feedlot, where they were instrumented with a real-time location-monitoring ear tag, placed in randomly assigned pens (n = 5 pens/treatment), and monitored for 21 days. During experiment 2, calves in pens were administered the treatment opposite that of experiment 1, returned to their pens without undergoing transportation, and monitored for another 21 days. For each experiment, mean daily distance traveled and percentage time spent near feed (PNF) and water (PNW) were calculated on a pen basis and compared between treatments.

RESULTS During experiment 1, mean daily distance traveled, PNF, and PNW did not differ significantly between meloxicam-treated and control calves; however, all 3 behaviors varied significantly by day. During experiment 2, although mean distance traveled was significantly associated with the interaction between day and treatment, it did not differ significantly between meloxicam-treated and control calves within any specific day. Mean PNF and PNW were significantly associated with day only, although no pattern in that effect was evident.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that a single dose of meloxicam prior to transportation did not significantly affect the behaviors of transported and nontransported calves.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of meloxicam administration before long-distance transport on inflammatory mediators and leukocyte function of cattle at feedlot arrival.

ANIMALS 60 healthy yearling beef steers.

PROCEDURES Single-source steers were assigned to a transported (n = 40) or nontransported (20) group. Then, half of the steers within each group were assigned to receive meloxicam (1 mg/kg, PO) or a lactose placebo (1 bolus/steer, PO). All steers were transported approximately 1,300 km overnight to a feedlot; however, the nontransported group was moved before treatment (meloxicam or placebo) administration and allowed a 17-day acclimation period, whereas the transported group was moved immediately after treatment administration on day −1. Blood samples for measurement of inflammatory mediators and leukocyte function were collected from all steers on days −1, 0, and 3.

RESULTS For steers that received meloxicam, mean plasma meloxicam concentration for the transported group was significantly greater than that for the nontransported group on day 0. For steers that received the placebo, mean haptoglobin-matrix metalloproteinase-9 complex for the transported group was significantly greater than that for the nontransported group on day 0. Mean haptoglobin concentration, neutrophil L-selectin intensity, and polymorphonuclear leukocyte count for the transported group were significantly greater than those for the nontransported group. Mean substance P concentration for nontransported steers that received meloxicam was significantly lower than that for the other 3 treatment groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated meloxicam administration to healthy steers immediately before long-distance transport did not significantly mitigate the effects of transport-induced stress on leukocyte function or inflammatory markers.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research