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Abstract

Current guidelines for the use of systemic antimicrobials for the treatment of superficial bacterial folliculitis in dogs include the recommendation that the disease be treated for a minimum of 3 weeks and for at least 1 week beyond clinical resolution. With increasing antimicrobial resistance being noted for bacteria involved in this condition, as well as the increased use of evidence-based medicine, this dogma needs to be reevaluated.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Viewpoint articles represent the opinions of the authors and do not represent AVMA endorsement of such statements.

Introduction

Events such as the COVID-19 pandemic, police brutality, and climate change have exposed how structural factors such as politics, economics, and infrastructure impact human health, particularly the health of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC). Structural racism is defined as “the totality of ways in which societies foster racial discrimination, through mutually reinforcing inequitable systems (in housing, education, employment, earnings, benefits, credit, media, health care, criminal justice, and so on) that in turn reinforce discriminatory beliefs, values, and distribution of resources.”

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Viewpoint articles represent the opinions of the authors and do not represent AVMA endorsement of such statements.

Introduction

“Imperfections are not inadequacies; they are reminders that we’re all in this together.

We don’t have to do all of it alone. We were never meant to.”

–Brené Brown

In 2016, The Oiho State University (OSU) College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) began a strategic planning process systematically evaluating 6 crucial domains: 1) institutional culture and sustainability of its people, 2) education and success of our students, 3) innovative and impactful research, 4) features of a highly successful referral veterinary medical center,

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Viewpoint articles represent the opinions of the authors and do not represent AVMA endorsement of such statements.

Introduction

Antimicrobial stewardship has been defined for the veterinary profession as “the actions veterinarians take individually and as a profession to preserve the effectiveness and availability of antimicrobial drugs through conscientious oversight and responsible medical decision-making while safeguarding animal, public, and environmental health.”1 These actions may include making a commitment in one’s veterinary practice by assigning a staff member to track stewardship activities, selecting antimicrobials in a judicious and evidence-based manner, or attending continuing education about antimicrobial use (AMU) decision-making. The

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Overview of Outcomes Research

Outcomes research entails the application of clinical- and population-based research methods to optimize the end results of health-care practices and interventions, delivering benefits and value to stakeholders.1 Widely used in human health care, outcomes research principles can assist health-care providers and their patients in making decisions regarding medical costs while weighing available treatment options. The overarching goal of health-care providers should be to achieve clinical outcomes and improve value for patients. Value, however, is not the same as low cost. Porter and Lee2 defined value as the health-related outcomes that matter to

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Author: Joerg Mayer

Abstract

Abstract

Veterinary education is becoming more and more complex, but the ultimate goal—providing an education that will prepare students for entry-level positions in the profession—remains the same. Often, hands-on work with living animals aimed at achieving core competencies is relegated to the final year of the veterinary curriculum. But, incorporating honeybees allows introduction of these important concepts during earlier years of veterinary student training. In addition, honeybees are under severe threat from a multitude of health problems, and this has dire implications for our own food supply. Veterinarians need to be actively involved in addressing this health crisis. Ever since the US FDA implemented its Veterinary Feed Directive rule, which dictates how certain antimicrobials can legally be administered in the feed or water of food-producing animals, and made changes to its policy on the use of medically necessary antimicrobials on bees, honeybees have fallen under the direct purview of veterinarians, highlighting the need for greater literacy in honeybee health. The present manuscript describes reasons why and ways how honeybees can play a larger role in the education of veterinarians in the United States.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Introduction

The past several decades have seen substantial advances in clinical veterinary medicine, including widespread specialization, access to more complex diagnostic testing and imaging methods, and increased availability of advanced treatments. However, these advances, in conjunction with the increasing costs of veterinary education, medical equipment, and general practice operations, mean that veterinary care can be financially out of reach for many pet owners. 1 A recent survey 2 of pet owners in the United States found that 28% had experienced a barrier to veterinary care in the previous 2 years and that the overwhelming barrier, for all types

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Introduction

Technological advances are creating an ever-widening array of options for detecting pathogens and diagnosing diseases of concern in clinical and regulatory veterinary medicine. New technology can facilitate timelier responses and, in some instances, move assays from laboratory-based to patient-side. However, these technological advances can also create confusion in selecting the most appropriate tests and interpreting their results. The present article discusses the process of diagnostic test validation and the use of molecular diagnostic tests in clinical and regulatory veterinary medicine. For the purposes of this article, the term molecular diagnostic tests refers to tests that detect molecular components, including

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

“Learning is not the product of teaching. Learning is the product of the activity of learners.”

John Holt

In his more than 25 years of general practice, Dr. Mike Dyer has seen the many challenges new veterinary graduates face. He and his partners employ approximately 20 veterinarians in 9 practices in the tristate area encompassing southeastern Ohio, eastern Kentucky, and western West Virginia. Typically, he says, it takes about 2 years for a new graduate to become fully prepared for practice. “It's like we've had to complete their clinical training once we hired them,” says Dr. Dyer, whose Appalachia-based practices

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Introduction

Phosphorus is the 11th most abundant mineral on earth and is present in all living organisms. It is found in every part of the cell, including the phospholipid bilayer membrane, the mitochondria, and the nucleus. Phosphorylation is important for regulation of enzyme activity and results in both activation and inactivation of various key enzymes. The largest pool of phosphorus in vertebrates is skeletal tissue, which acts as a storage depot and may release or absorb phosphorus as needed. Overall, phosphorus comprises about 1% of the total body weight of an adult person, with 85% in skeletal tissue and bone,

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association