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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether plasma cardiac troponin I (cTnl) concentrations can be used to identify cardiac involvement in dogs with hemangiosarcoma, exclude cardiac hemangiosarcoma in dogs with noncardiac hemangiosarcoma, and identify cardiac hemangiosarcoma in dogs with pericardial effusion.

Design—Cohort study

Animals—57 dogs (18 with confirmed [5 dogs] or suspected [13] cardiac hemangiosarcoma, 14 with confirmed hemangiosarcoma involving sites other than the heart [noncardiac hemangiosarcoma], 10 with pericardial effusion not caused by hemangiosarcoma, and 15 with noncardiac nonhemangiosarcoma neoplasms).

Procedures—Plasma cTnl concentration was measured, and thoracic radiography, abdominal ultrasonography, and echocardiography were performed in each dog. The cTnl concentration was compared among groups.

Results—Median plasma cTnl concentration in dogs with cardiac hemangiosarcoma was significantly higher than the concentration in each of the other groups. A plasma cTnl concentration > 0.25 ng/mL could be used to identify cardiac involvement in dogs with hemangiosarcoma at any site (sensitivity, 78%; specificity, 71 %). A plasma cTnl concentration > 0.25 ng/mL could be used to identify cardiac hemangiosarcoma in dogs with pericardia effusion (sensitivity, 81%; specificity, 100%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The median plasma cTnl concentration was higher in dogs with cardiac hemangiosarcoma, compared with the median concentration in dogs with hemangiosarcoma at other sites, dogs with other neoplasms, and dogs with pericardial effusion not caused by hemangiosarcoma. The plasma cTnl concentration may be used to identify cardiac involvement in dogs with hemangiosarcoma and to identify cardiac hemangiosarcoma in dogs with pericardial effusion. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2010;237:806–811)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—4 horses with a history of neck pain, abnormal head carriage, and related inability to perform were examined. Cranial nuchal bursitis was diagnosed in 2 horses, and caudal nuchal bursitis was diagnosed in the other 2.

Clinical Findings—All 4 horses had prominent swelling in the region between the frontal bone and temporal fossa (ie, the poll) and abnormal head carriage. Ultrasonographic examination revealed fluid distention and synovial thickening of the cranial or caudal nuchal bursa in all 4 horses. Ultrasonography-guided aspiration of the affected region was performed successfully in 3 horses. Radiography revealed bony remodeling and mineralization over the dorsal aspect of the atlas in 1 horse and a radiolucency at the axis in another. Nuclear scintigraphy revealed an increase in radioisotope uptake at the level of C2 in 1 horse. Although a septic process was considered among the differential diagnoses in all horses, a septic process could only be confirmed in 1 horse.

Treatment and Outcome—All horses were refractory to conservative management consisting of intrabursal injection of anti-inflammatory medications. Bursoscopic debridement and lavage of the affected bursae resulted in resolution of the clinical signs in all horses, and they all returned to their intended use.

Clinical Relevance—Cranial and caudal nuchal bursitis, of nonseptic or septic origin, should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with head and neck pain. Horses undergoing surgical intervention consisting of nuchal bursoscopy have the opportunity to return to their original degree of exercise. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2010;237:823–829)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a single measurement of cortisol concentration can be used to monitor dogs receiving trilostane for hyperadrenocorticism.

Design—Controlled drug efficacy trial.

Animals—103 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Results of ACTH stimulation tests before and during trilostane treatment were evaluated. Each cortisol concentration after ACTH stimulation was classified as indicative of excessive, acceptable, or inadequate control of adrenal gland function, as outlined by the trilostane manufacturer. Baseline cortisol concentrations before and during trilostane treatment were evaluated; target variables were defined, and sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were determined.

Results—Results of 103 and 342 ACTH stimulation tests before and during treatment were evaluated. In this population, baseline cortisol concentrations ≥ 1.3 μg/dL accurately excluded excessive suppression (defined by cortisol concentration after ACTH stimulation < 1.5 μg/dL) in 254 of 259 (98%) dogs. In addition, baseline cortisol concentrations ≤ 2.9 μg/dL correctly excluded inadequate control (defined by cortisol concentration after ACTH stimulation > 9.1 μg/dL) in 200 of 211 (95%) dogs. During trilostane treatment, baseline cortisol concentrations between 1.3 and either 2.9 μg/dL or ≤ 50% of the pretreatment baseline cortisol concentration correctly predicted acceptable control of adrenal gland function in 147 of 168 (88%) dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Evaluation of a baseline cortisol concentration collected 4 to 6 hours after trilostane administration in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism provided clinically useful information about control of adrenal gland function. Many dogs receiving trilostane may be adequately monitored without the expense and inconvenience of an ACTH stimulation test. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2010;237:801–805)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association