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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine intra- and interobserver reliability of a fluorescein stain–based tear film breakup time (TFBUT) test as performed in a clinical environment with and without administration of a topical anesthetic.

ANIMALS

21 privately owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

A randomized study design was used. Two independent observers that commonly perform the TFBUT test in clinical practice read the same description of TFBUT. Observers performed TFBUT testing for each dog before and after topical administration of 0.5% proparacaine solution in 4 testing periods with a 1-hour interval between periods. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis was used to assess inter- and intraobserver test reliability. Linear mixed models were used to assess the main effects of testing period, observer, eye, and presence of ophthalmic disorders and their interactions on TFBUT.

RESULTS

Mean TFBUT measurements performed by observer 1 and observer 2 were 5.9 seconds and 8.6 seconds, respectively, when adjusted for other effects in the model. Intraobserver ICC was poor for one observer and moderate for the other. Interobserver ICC was poor without use of topical anesthetic and slightly lower when anesthetic was used. Observer and testing period were each significantly associated with TFBUT; the measurements decreased and were more variable after multiple applications of fluorescein stain and proparacaine.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested tear film stability is negatively affected by topical administration of 0.5% proparacaine solution and repeated applications of fluorescein stain. The TFBUT test as performed in this study had poor to moderate reliability.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify and characterize abnormalities of iris vasculature in dogs with diabetes mellitus, compared to clinically normal, age-matched control dogs, by means of anterior segment angiography.

ANIMALS

10 dogs with naturally occurring diabetes mellitus and 10 age-matched control dogs with no ocular or systemic disease.

PROCEDURES

The day before iris vasculature abnormality (IVA) assessment, all dogs underwent complete physical and ophthalmic examinations and baseline clinicopathologic analyses. For diabetic dogs, serum fructosamine concentration and a 12-hour blood glucose concentration curve were generated. The next day, all dogs were sedated and anterior segment angiography (following IV injection of indocyanine green [1 mg/kg] and subsequently sodium fluorescein [20 mg/kg]) was performed with a full-spectrum camera and camera adapter system. Group findings were compared, and multiple linear regression analysis was performed to identify potential factor associations with IVAs.

RESULTS

During anterior segment angiography, the arterial, capillary, and venous phases were identified in all dogs. Times to onset of all phases in diabetic dogs were significantly less than those in control dogs. Vascular disruptions within the peripupillary region (evident following sodium fluorescein administration) were common in diabetic dogs. Severity of dye leakage into the iris stroma and aqueous humor was significantly greater in diabetic dogs than in control dogs. Duration of disease, mean blood glucose concentration, and serum fructosamine concentration were significantly associated with IVAs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In diabetic dogs, anterior segment angiography revealed IVAs that were not evident in control dogs. The severity of those changes appeared to be associated with disease duration and blood glucose regulation.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the feasibility of ocular ultrasonography for measurement of the ratio of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) to eyeball transverse diameter (ETD) in dogs with various morphologies and to evaluate the interob-server reliability of the ONSD/ETD ratio and its correlation with various morphological variables.

ANIMALS

45 healthy dogs of various breeds.

PROCEDURES

Height, head circumference, body weight, body condition score, intraocular pressure, and blood pressure were recorded for each dog. Unsedated dogs underwent bilateral ocular ultrasonography once. A veterinarian and board-certified ophthalmologist who were unaware of subject signalment independently reviewed the ultrasonographic videos and selected 1 image for each eye on which the ETD and ONSD were measured. The ONSD/ ETD ratio was calculated and compared between the 2 observers. Correlations between the ONSD/ETD ratio and various physiologic and morphological variables were assessed.

RESULTS

172 ONSD/ETD ratios were recorded. The ONSD/ETD ratio was calculated for at least 1 eye for 44 of the 45 (98%) dogs. Mean ± SD time required to complete the ultrasonographic examination was 90 ± 30 seconds (range, 15 seconds to 3 minutes). The mean ± SD ONSD/ETD ratio was 0.17 ± 0.01 (range, 0.15 to 0.20). The ONSD/ETD ratio did not differ significantly between the left and right eyes or the 2 observers and was not correlated with any of the variables assessed.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Ocular ultrasonography was a rapid, noninvasive, and reliable method for measurement of the ONSD/ETD ratio. The ONSD/ETD ratio did not appear to be influenced by dog morphology.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the effects of orally administered trazodone on intraocular pressure (IOP), pupil diameter measured in the vertical plane (ie, vertical pupil diameter [VPD]), selected physical examination variables, and sedation level in healthy equids.

ANIMALS

7 horses and 1 pony.

PROCEDURES

Food was withheld for 12 hours prior to drug administration. After baseline (time 0) sedation scoring, physical examination, and measurement of IOP and VPD, equids received 1 dose (approx 6 mg/kg) of trazodone orally. Examination and measurement procedures were repeated 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours after drug administration. Blood samples were collected at each time point for analysis of plasma trazodone concentrations. Repeated-measures analysis was used to compare examination results between downstream time points and baseline.

RESULTS

7 of 8 equids had mild sedation from 0.5 to 8 hours after treatment; compared with baseline values, mean IOP was significantly lower from 0.5 hours to 8 hours, mean VPD was significantly smaller at 0.5 hours, and mean rectal temperature was significantly lower from 1 to 8 hours after drug administration. Adverse effects (signs of excitement in 1 equid and sweating in 4) were self-limiting and considered minor. Mean maximum plasma concentration of trazodone was 1,493 ng/mL 0.75 hours after administration, and terminal half-life of the drug was 9.96 hours.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The described oral dose of trazadone elicited sedation with a few self-limiting adverse effects in the study sample. Drug effects on IOP and VPD may alter ocular examination findings. Further investigation is warranted prior to use of trazodone for sedation in equids, particularly those with ophthalmic conditions.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the effects of short-term and prolonged topical instillation of 0.1% diclofenac sodium, 0.5% ketorolac tromethamine, and 0.03% flurbiprofen sodium on corneal sensitivity (CS) in ophthalmologically normal cats.

ANIMALS

12 healthy adult domestic shorthair cats.

PROCEDURES

In the first of 2 study phases, each cat received 0.1% diclofenac sodium, 0.5% ketorolac tromethamine, 0.03% flurbiprofen sodium, and saline (0.9% NaCl; control) solutions (1 drop [0.05 mL]/eye, q 5 min for 5 treatments) in a randomized order with a 2-day washout period between treatments. For each cat, an esthesiometer was used to measure CS before treatment initiation (baseline) and at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after the last dose. There was a 2-day washout period between phases. The second phase was similar to the first, except each treatment was administered at a dosage of 1 drop/eye, twice daily for 5 days and CS was measured before treatment initiation and at 15 minutes and 24 and 48 hours after the last dose. The Friedman test was used to evaluate change in CS over time.

RESULTS

None of the 4 treatments had a significant effect on CS over time in either study phase.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that neither short-term nor prolonged topical instillation of 3 NSAID ophthalmic solutions had any effect on the CS of healthy cats. Given potential differences in cyclooxygenase expression between healthy and diseased eyes, further investigation of the effects of topical NSAID instillation in the eyes of cats with ocular surface inflammation is warranted.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effects of gabapentin, tramadol, and meloxicam on tear production, intraocular pressure (IOP), pupillary diameter, tear break-up time, and corneal touch threshold in healthy dogs when given orally for 3 days.

ANIMALS

9 healthy research Beagles.

PROCEDURES

A randomized, blinded, case-crossover study with a 6-sequence, 3-treatment, and 3-period design was performed. A 7-day acclimation period was followed by 3 treatment phases, each with a 3-day treatment period followed by a 7-day washout period for 3 different drugs. Block randomization was used to group dogs for treatments with drug A (gabapentin), B (tramadol), or C (meloxicam). Measurements of tear production, IOP, pupillary diameter, tear break-up time, and corneal touch threshold were performed on a schedule. A generalized mixed-effects linear regression model was created for each ocular variable, accounting for repeated measures within individuals.

RESULTS

Intraocular pressure was the only variable to have differed substantially between the first 5 and last 2 days of the acclimation period. When treatment phase, day, time of day, dog identification, baseline value, and eye were accounted for, the mean IOP was lower for dogs during treatment phases with gabapentin or tramadol, compared with meloxicam, but this difference was not considered clinically meaningful.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that a minimum 5-day acclimation period is necessary for IOP measurements to return to baseline in dogs. The statistically identified effect of gabapentin and tramadol on IOP in dogs of the present study warrants further investigation. It is possible that at higher dosages, or in dogs with glaucoma, this effect may become clinically significant.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effectiveness of a novel fluorescence tracer agent, MB-102, for conducting ocular angiography in dogs.

ANIMALS

10 ophthalmologically normal dogs (2 to 4 years old) and 10 dogs with retinal degeneration or primary open-angle glaucoma (< 6 years old).

PROCEDURES

While anesthetized, all dogs received sodium fluorescein (20 mg/kg, IV) or MB-102 (20 or 40 mg/kg, IV) first and then the other dye in a second treatment session 2 days later in a randomized crossover design. Anterior fluorescence angiography was performed on one eye and posterior fluorescence angiography on the other. Imaging was performed with a full-spectrum camera and camera adaptor system. Filter sets that were tailored to match the excitation and emission characteristics of each angiographic fluorescent agent were used.

RESULTS

All phases and phase intervals during anterior and posterior segment angiography were identified, regardless of the dye used. However, agent fluorescence and visualization of the iridal blood vessels were hindered in some dogs, irrespective of agent, owing to the degree of iridal pigmentation present. No significant difference was noted between the 2 dyes in any phase or phase interval, and slight improvement in image contrast was observed with MB-102 during the venous phases owing to a reduction of vessel wall staining in both normal and diseased eyes.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that MB-102 would be useful for conducting ocular angiography in dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the efficacy of 0.05% difluprednate ophthalmic emulsion and 1% prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension for controlling aqueocentesis-induced breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier in healthy dogs.

ANIMALS

34 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were allocated to 5 groups (6 to 8 dogs/group) to receive 0.05% difluprednate, 1% prednisolone acetate, or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control treatment) in both eyes 2 or 4 times daily. Eye drops were administered topically for 5 consecutive days. Anterior chamber paracentesis (aqueocentesis) was performed in 1 eye on the third day. Automated fluorophotometry was performed immediately before and 20 minutes and 24 and 48 hours after aqueocentesis. Relative fluorescence (RF), defined as fluorescence of the eye that had undergone aqueocentesis divided by fluorescence of the contralateral eye, was calculated to help control for variation among dogs.

RESULTS

Mean RF was significantly lower at 24 hours after aqueocentesis in dogs treated twice daily with 0.05% difluprednate or 4 times daily with 1% prednisolone acetate than in dogs receiving the control treatment. At 48 hours after aqueocentesis, mean RF was significantly lower in dogs treated 4 times daily with 1% prednisolone acetate than in control dogs. Mean RF differed over time in dogs treated 4 times daily with 0.05% difluprednate but did not differ over time for any of the other treatments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

All 4 treatments were effective for reducing aqueocentesis-induced anterior uveitis in healthy dogs regardless of the drug or frequency of administration. Topical ophthalmic administration of 0.05% difluprednate may be a viable treatment option for dogs with anterior uveitis and warrants further study.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To develop and assess a novel ex vivo corneal culture technique involving an agarose-based dome scaffold (ABDS) for use as a model of in vivo corneal wound healing in dogs and rabbits.

SAMPLE

Corneas from clinically normal dogs (paired corneas from 8 dogs and 8 single corneas) and rabbits (21 single corneas).

PROCEDURES

8 single dog corneas (DCs), 1 DC from each pair, and 10 rabbit corneas (RCs) were wounded with an excimer laser; 1 DC from each pair and 11 RCs remained unwounded. Corneas were cultured for 21 days on ABDSs (8 pairs of DCs and all RCs) or on flat-topped scaffolds (8 single DCs). The surface area of corneal fluorescein retention was measured every 6 (DCs) or 12 (RCs) hours until full corneal epithelialization was detected. Changes in corneal clarity were evaluated at 0, 7, 14, and 21 days.

RESULTS

Median time to full epithelialization for wounded dog and rabbit corneas was 48 and 60 hours, respectively; among wounded DCs, time to full epithelization did not differ by scaffold type. After 21 days of culture on ABDSs, all DCs and RCs that epithelialized developed a circular, diffuse, cloud-like pattern of optical haze, whereas DCs cultured on flat-topped scaffolds developed a focal, crater-like region of optical haze. All corneas on the ABDSs maintained convex curvature throughout the study.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Wounded ex vivo DCs and RCs cultured on ABDSs reliably epithelialized, formed optical haze (consistent with in vivo wound healing), and maintained convex curvature. This culture technique may be adaptable to other species.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate effects of topical ophthalmic administration of diclofenac on intraocular pressure (IOP) when applied at 4 frequencies to eyes of Beagles.

ANIMALS

8 ophthalmologically normal Beagles.

PROCEDURES

The study involved four 5-day experimental periods each separated by a 16-day washout period. During each period, 1 drop of 0.1% diclofenac sodium ophthalmic solution was administered to the right eye at 4 treatment frequencies (1, 2, 3, or 4 times/d); 1 drop of eyewash was administered to the left eye as a control treatment. A complete ophthalmic examination was performed on days 0 (day before first treatment) and 5 of each experimental period. Gonioscopy was performed on day 0 of the first period. The IOPs were measured at 7 am and 7 pm on days 1 through 5.

RESULTS

No abnormalities were detected during neuro-ophthalmic and ophthalmic examinations on day 0 of each experimental period. No adverse reactions to administration of diclofenac or eyewash were observed at any time point. No abnormalities were detected during ophthalmic examinations performed on day 5, and IOPs remained < 25 mm Hg in all 4 periods. No significant differences were identified between the treated and control eyes or among the 4 treatment frequencies.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Topical ophthalmic administration of diclofenac up to 4 times/d in dogs with no ophthalmic abnormalities did not significantly increase the IOP. Additional research is needed to evaluate the effect of topical ophthalmic administration of diclofenac on IOP in dogs with anterior uveitis.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research