Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 168 items for :

  • Commentaries x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Introduction

The COVID-19 pandemic brought unprecedented challenges to veterinary education. As the public health situation worsened, veterinary colleges and schools across North America adapted rapidly to continue teaching and mentoring their students. This required a close examination of veterinary curriculums to prioritize efforts to adequately prepare future veterinarians for their careers. As part of the examination, the appropriate role of swine veterinary medicine in modern curricula needed to be defined and updated. As a new normality emerges, it is critically important that both a basic understanding of swine medicine, as well as opportunities for advanced swine learning and clinical skill

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Introduction

Medical error is widespread in both human 1 and veterinary medicine, 24 although the latter is much less studied. Much of this error is attributable to poor communication, either between the veterinarian-physician and client-patient or within the medical team. This commentary focuses on the issues of within-team communication.

Handoffs

Within-team communication failures often occur during shift changes or transfers of case responsibility. In fact, an Institute of Medicine 2001 report indicates that inadequate handoffs are “where safety often fails first.” 5 As a result, there has been great interest within the human medical field

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

As veterinary students and future graduates, we believe that improving the professional and environmental sustainability and the diversity of our industry is the way forward. Our career choices will most certainly reflect these values. A veterinary culture that incorporates diversity, environmental sustainability, and a future-focused mindset will benefit staff members, clients, the community, and our future businesses. There is evidence that a diverse team is more open-minded, efficient, and ultimately more profitable. 1 Unfortunately, however, though our profession has progressed in many ways, the current diversity statistics of our industry seem discouragingly static. This should not be considered acceptable

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Introduction

The world has experienced multiple devastating infectious disease outbreaks in the past few decades. Most recently, the current COVID-19 pandemic has had catastrophic impacts on human health and economies around the world, and the 2018 outbreak of African swine fever (ASF) in China caused the world's largest pork-producing country to lose almost half of its pigs in 1 year. 1 Now, ASF has crossed international borders and is causing substantial damage to swine industries elsewhere in Asia and around the world. The global nature of these emerging infectious diseases requires strong and early international cooperation in public and

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Author: Paul Bartlett
Introduction

Go ahead: try a plant-based burger. Or maybe some ice cream made with vegan whey protein. Or some tissue culture chicken, now sold in Singapore but soon to be available in the United States. I’m not a connoisseur of fine foods, but I can barely taste a difference between these products and the animal-based products they imitate. The manufactured protein companies are targeting people like me who eat a lot of meat and dairy products. And, if progress like this continues, although there might be only minor changes to the way our food tastes in the future, there will

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Introduction

The AAVMC Foresight report 1 identified community engagement as a means of promoting the societal value of veterinary medicine, garnering public trust, and educating young people about the role of veterinarians. Through community engagement, veterinary professionals can build relationships that create opportunities for community members to better trust and comply with medical recommendations to increase patient well-being. 2,3 In addition, veterinary students may derive particular benefits from community-engagement opportunities. However, there is a dearth of research examining veterinary student community-engagement and service-learning experiences beyond the development of clinical skills. 4

Community-engagement experiences for veterinary students

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Introduction

Second-guessing refers to the all-too-human tendency to question or criticize someone's—or one's own—actions or decisions after the results of those actions or decisions are already known. In the sports world, second-guessing is frequently known as Monday morning quarterbacking and is a generally harmless pastime. In the health-care field, however, second-guessing can be detrimental, shaking the confidence of clinicians, particularly those early in their careers.

Of course, there are times when retrospective analysis of case-management decisions is appropriate. Structured morbidity and mortality rounds and even informal conversations with mentors and colleagues can help in identifying and correcting deficiencies in clinical

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Author: John J. Hasenau
Introduction

The Veterinary Consortium for Research Animal Care and Welfare is a new group composed of representative veterinarians from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners, American Association of Laboratory Animal Science, and Association of Primate Veterinarians. The goal of this newly formed consortium is to provide accurate information on the care and use of research animals to inform the public, lawmakers, and the scientific community about the veterinary care and welfare of these animals.

During its initial discussions, the consortium determined that there frequently was confusion or misunderstanding surrounding what was meant by

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In a recent study of suicides and deaths of uncertain intent among US veterinary professionals, Witte et al 1 found that for 34 of 73 (47%) veterinarians, the mechanism of death was classified as poisoning, with 18 of those 34 deaths (or 25% of the total) attributed to pentobarbital, the active ingredient in euthanasia solutions. Even more troubling, for 13 of the 18 deaths attributed to pentobarbital poisoning, the death-related injury occurred at home. Although data were not available on where or how the pentobarbital was procured, it seems likely that in some, if not all, of these cases,

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Ultimately, the value of any profession depends on its ability to address the needs of society 1,2 ; its survival depends on its ability to address the challenges it faces. In viewing the current state of the veterinary profession, we contend that changes are urgently needed if the profession is to continue addressing societal needs and ongoing challenges. For > 20 years, the flexibility of professional education and licensing embraced by the engineering profession has been discussed as a model that is exquisitely responsive to the changing needs of society and extremely effective in meeting new challenges. 3–7 We

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association