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Abstract

Objective—To identify indications for and short- and long-term outcome of permanent tracheostomy performed in standing horses.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—82 horses undergoing permanent tracheostomy.

Procedures—Data obtained from medical records included signalment, diagnosis, surgical technique, complications, use of the horse before and after surgery, and owner satisfaction. Follow-up information was obtained through a telephone questionnaire administered to owners.

Results—Indications for permanent tracheostomy included nasopharyngeal cicatrix (n = 59), arytenoid chondropathy (55), and laryngeal hemiplegia (20); 54 horses had multiple indications for tracheostomy. Complications identified prior to discharge included partial dehiscence (n = 8), transient fever (10), and excessive swelling (13). Complications identified after discharge included partial dehiscence (n = 3), inversion of skin (2), and stenosis of the tracheostomy requiring repair (1). Long-term follow-up information was available for 64 horses. Fifty-seven of the 64 (89%) horses returned to their previous use, and owners of 63 (98%) horses reported being very satisfied with the results. The owner of 1 (2%) horse was unsatisfied with the results. The 1-year survival rate was 97% (95% confidence interval, 95% to 100%). Mean estimated truncated survival time (ie, failure-free period) was 9.7 years (95% confidence interval, 9.3 to 10.1 years).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that permanent tracheostomy can be safely performed in standing horses and was a viable treatment for horses with obstructive disease of the upper respiratory tract that was unresponsive to medical treatment or other surgical treatments.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the long-term survival rate and factors that affect survival time of domestic ferrets treated surgically for hyperadrenocorticism.

Study Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—130 ferrets with hyperadrenocorticism that were treated surgically.

Procedures—Medical records of ferrets surgically treated for hyperadrenocorticism were reviewed. Data recorded included signalment, duration of clinical signs prior to hospital admission, CBC values, serum biochemical analysis results, anesthetic time, surgical time, concurrent diseases, adrenal gland affected (right, left, or both [bilateral]), histopathologic diagnosis, surgical procedure, caudal vena caval involvement (yes or no), postoperative melena (yes or no), days in hospital after surgery, and whether clinical signs of hyperadrenocorticism developed after surgery.

Results—130 ferrets were entered in the study (11 of 130 ferrets were admitted and underwent surgery twice). The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 98% and 88%, respectively. A 50% survival rate was never reached. Combined partial adrenal gland resection with cryosurgery had a significantly negative effect on survival time. No other risk factors were identified. Survival time was not significantly affected by either histopathologic diagnosis or specific affected adrenal gland (right, left, or bilateral).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ferrets with adrenal gland masses that were treated surgically had a good prognosis. Survival time of ferrets with hyperadrenocorticism undergoing surgery was not affected by the histologic characteristic of the tumor, the adrenal glands affected (right, left, or bilateral), or complete versus partial adrenal gland resection. Debulking was a sufficient surgical technique to allow a favorable long-term outcome when complete excision was not possible.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine signalment, physical examination and clinicopathologic abnormalities, outcome, and subsequent fertility of mares with periparturient hemorrhage (PPH) and identify factors associated with outcome (ie, survival vs death).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—73 mares.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for information on age, breed, initial complaint, physical examination and clinicopathologic abnormalities, treatment, outcome, and subsequent fertility.

Results—Median age was 14.0 years (range, 5 to 24 years), and median number of foals produced prior to the diagnosis of PPH was 8 (range, 1 to 16). Ten (14%) mares had prepartum hemorrhage and 63 (86%) had postpartum hemorrhage. Treatment was aimed at restoring cardiovascular volume, enhancing coagulation, controlling pain, and reducing the effects of endotoxemia. Sixty-one (84%) mares survived and 12 (16%) died or were euthanized. Common complications included fever, leukopenia, retained fetal membranes, increased digital pulses, thrombophlebitis, and cardiac arrhythmias. Of the 53 surviving mares for which subsequent breeding information was available, 26 (49%) produced 1 or more foals after recovering from PPH.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that PPH can develop in mares of any age and parity. Treatment was associated with a good prognosis for survival and a reasonable prognosis for future fertility.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association