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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics of detomidine hydrochloride administered IV (as an injectable formulation) or by the oral-transmucosal (OTM) route (as a gel) and assess sedative effects of the OTM treatment in healthy dogs.

ANIMALS 12 healthy adult dogs.

PROCEDURES In phase 1, detomidine was administered by IV (0.5 mg/m2) or OTM (1 mg/m2) routes to 6 dogs. After a 24-hour washout period, each dog received the alternate treatment. Blood samples were collected for quantification via liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and pharmacokinetic analysis. In phase 2, 6 dogs received dexmedetomidine IV (0.125 mg/m2) or detomidine gel by OTM administration (0.5 mg/m2), and sedation was measured by a blinded observer using 2 standardized sedation scales while dogs underwent jugular catheter placement. After a l-week washout period, each dog received the alternate treatment.

RESULTS Median maximum concentration, time to maximum concentration, and bioavailability for detomidine gel following OTM administration were 7.03 ng/mL, 1.00 hour, and 34.52%, respectively; harmonic mean elimination half-life was 0.63 hours. All dogs were sedated and became laterally recumbent with phase 1 treatments. In phase 2, median global sedation score following OTM administration of detomidine gel was significantly lower (indicating a lesser degree of sedation) than that following IV dexmedetomidine treatment; however, total sedation score during jugular vein catheterization did not differ between treatments. The gel was subjectively easy to administer, and systemic absorption was sufficient for sedation.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Detomidine gel administered by the OTM route provided sedation suitable for a short, minimally invasive procedure in healthy dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects at the injection site of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA) following IM administration of 1 dose to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

ANIMALS 7 adult nonreleasable healthy red-tailed hawks.

PROCEDURES In a randomized crossover study, CCFA (10 or 20 mg/kg) was administered IM to each hawk and blood samples were obtained. After a 2-month washout period, administration was repeated with the opposite dose. Muscle biopsy specimens were collected from the injection site 10 days after each sample collection period. Pharmacokinetic data were calculated. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of ceftiofur for various bacterial isolates were assessed.

RESULTS Mean peak plasma concentrations of ceftiofur-free acid equivalent were 6.8 and 15.1 μg/mL for the 10 and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively. Mean times to maximum plasma concentration were 6.4 and 6.7 hours, and mean terminal half-lives were 29 and 50 hours, respectively. Little to no muscle inflammation was identified. On the basis of a target MIC of 1 μg/mL and target plasma ceftiofur concentration of 4 μg/mL, dose administration frequencies for infections with gram-negative and gram-positive organisms were estimated as every 36 and 45 hours for the 10 mg/kg dose and every 96 and 120 hours for the 20 mg/kg dose, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Study results suggested that CCFA could be administered IM to red-tailed hawks at 10 or 20 mg/kg to treat infections with ceftiofur-susceptible bacteria. Administration resulted in little to no inflammation at the injection site. Additional studies are needed to evaluate effects of repeated CCFA administration.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine pharmacokinetics of butorphanol delivered via osmotic pumps in common peafowl (Pavo cristatus) as a method for analgesic administration to avian species.

ANIMALS 14 healthy adult male common peafowl.

PROCEDURES A preliminary experiment was conducted with 2 birds to establish time point and concentration requirements. Then, the remaining 12 birds were anesthetized, and 2 osmotic pumps containing butorphanol (volume, 2 mL; mean dosage, 247 μg/kg/h) were implanted subcutaneously in each bird for 7 days prior to removal. Blood samples were collected before pump implantation (time 0); 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144, and 168 hours after pump implantation; and 3 and 6 hours after pump removal. Plasma butorphanol concentrations were measured via liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry.

RESULTS Plasma concentrations peaked (mean, 106.4 μg/L; range, 61.8 to 133.0 μg/L) at a mean of 39.0 hours, with no evidence of sedation in any bird. After pump removal, butorphanol was rapidly eliminated (half-life, 1.45 hours; range, 1.31 to 1.64 hours; n = 5). Mean clearance per fraction of dose absorbed was 2.89 L/kg/h (range, 2.00 to 5.55 L/kg/h). Mean amount of time the plasma butorphanol concentration was ≥ 60 μg/L was 85.6 hours (range, 3.5 to 155.3 hours).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Plasma concentrations of butorphanol in common peafowl were maintained at or above reported efficacious analgesic concentrations. This study established a method for administering analgesics to avian patients without the need for frequent handling or injections. Use of these osmotic pumps may provide options for avian analgesia.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the novel factor Xa inhibitor apixaban in clinically normal cats.

ANIMALS 5 purpose-bred domestic shorthair cats.

PROCEDURES A single dose of apixaban (0.2 mg/kg, PO) was administered to each cat (time 0), and blood samples were obtained at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 120, 240, 360, 480, and 1,440 minutes. After a 1-week washout period, another dose of apixaban (0.2 mg/kg, IV) was administered to each cat, and blood samples were obtained at 0, 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 120, 240, 360, 480, and 1,440 minutes. Apixaban concentrations in plasma were measured via liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacodynamic effects of apixaban were determined with a commercial assay for factor × activity, which measures endogenous factor Xa activity chromogenically.

RESULTS Factor Xa was inhibited as a function of time after a single dose of apixaban administered orally or IV, and a direct inverse correlation with the plasma apixaban concentration was detected. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed moderate clearance, short half-life, and high bioavailability for apixaban. A 2-compartment model was fit to the IV pharmacokinetic data; compartmental modeling could not be used to adequately describe the oral data because of substantial interindividual variability.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results inticated that apixaban was an effective inhibitor of factor Xa in cats. Further studies will be needed to determine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics after multidose administration, effects of cardiac disease on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, dosing recommendations, and efficacy of apixaban for use in the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disease in cats.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate pharmacokinetics of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (TTM) after IV and oral administration to dogs and effects of TTM administration on trace mineral concentrations.

ANIMALS 8 adult Beagles and Beagle crossbreds (4 sexually intact males and 4 sexually intact females).

PROCEDURES Dogs received TTM (1 mg/kg) IV and orally in a randomized crossover study. Serum molybdenum and copper concentrations were measured via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in samples obtained 0 to 72 hours after administration. Pharmacokinetics was determined via noncompartmental analysis.

RESULTS For IV administration, mean ± SD terminal elimination rate constant, maximum concentration, area under the curve, and half-life were 0.03 ± 0.01 hours−1, 4.9 ± 0.6 μg/mL, 30.7 ± 5.4 μg/mL•h, and 27.7 ± 6.8 hours, respectively. For oral administration, mean ± SD terminal elimination rate constant, time to maximum concentration, maximum concentration, area under the curve, and half-life were 0.03 ± 0.01 hours−1, 3.0 ± 3.5 hours, 0.2 ± 0.4 μg/mL, 6.5 ± 8.0 μg/mL•h, and 26.8 ± 8.0 hours, respectively. Oral bioavailability was 21 ± 22%. Serum copper concentrations increased significantly after IV and oral administration. Emesis occurred after IV (2 dogs) and oral administration (3 dogs).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Pharmacokinetics for TTM after a single IV and oral administration was determined for clinically normal dogs. Absorption of TTM after oral administration was variable. Increased serum copper concentrations suggested that TTM mobilized tissue copper. Further studies will be needed to evaluate the potential therapeutic use of TTM in copper-associated chronic hepatitis of dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine pharmacokinetics of posaconazole in dogs given an IV solution, oral suspension, and delayed-release tablet.

ANIMALS 6 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES Posaconazole was administered IV (3 mg/kg) and as an oral suspension (6 mg/kg) to dogs in a randomized crossover study. Blood samples were collected before (time 0) and for 48 hours after each dose. In an additional experiment, 5 of the dogs received posaconazole delayed-release tablets (mean dose, 6.9 mg/kg); blood samples were collected for 96 hours. Plasma concentrations were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography.

RESULTS IV solution terminal half-life (t1/2) was 29 hours (coefficient of variation [CV], 23%). Clearance and volume of distribution were 78 mL/h/kg (CV, 59%) and 3.3 L/kg (CV, 38%), respectively. Oral suspension t1/2 was 24 hours (CV, 42%). Maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of 0.42 μg/mL (CV, 56%) was obtained at 7.7 hours (CV, 92%). Mean bioavailability was 26% (range, 7.8% to 160%). Delayed-release tablet t1/2 was 42 hours (CV, 25%), with a Cmax of 1.8 μg/mL (CV, 44%) at 9.5 hours (CV, 85%). Mean bioavailability of tablets was 159% (range, 85% to 500%). Bioavailability of delayed-release tablets was 497% (range, 140% to 1,800%) relative to that of the oral suspension.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Absorption of posaconazole oral suspension in dogs was variable. Absorption of the delayed-release tablets was greater than absorption of the oral suspension, with a longer t1/2 that may favor its clinical use in dogs. Administration of delayed-release tablets at a dosage of 5 mg/kg every other day can be considered for future studies.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics of doxycycline hyclate administered orally in the form of experimental formulations with different proportions of acrylic acid–polymethacrylate-based matrices.

ANIMALS 30 healthy adult dogs.

PROCEDURES In a crossover study, dogs were randomly assigned (in groups of 10) to receive a single oral dose (20 mg/kg) of doxycycline hyclate without excipients (control) or extended-release formulations (ERFs) containing doxycycline, acrylic acid polymer, and polymethacrylate in the following proportions: 1:0.5:0.0075 (ERF1) or 1:1:0.015 (ERF2). Serum concentrations of doxycycline were determined for pharmacokinetic analysis before and at several intervals after each treatment.

RESULTS Following oral administration to the study dogs, each ERF resulted in therapeutic serum doxycycline concentrations for 48 hours, whereas the control treatment resulted in therapeutic serum doxycycline concentrations for only 24 hours. All pharmacokinetic parameters for ERF1 and ERF2 were significantly different; however, findings for ERF1 did not differ significantly from those for the control treatment.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that both ERFs containing doxycycline, acrylic acid polymer, and polymethacrylate had an adequate pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship for a time-dependent drug and a longer release time than doxycycline alone following oral administration in dogs. Given the minimum effective serum doxycycline concentration of 0.26 μg/mL, a dose interval of 48 hours can be achieved for each tested ERF. This minimum inhibitory concentration has the potential to be effective against several susceptible bacteria involved in important infections in dogs. Treatment of dogs with either ERF may have several benefits over treatment with doxycycline alone.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics of pergolide after IV administration to horses.

ANIMALS 8 healthy adult horses.

PROCEDURES Pergolide mesylate was administered IV at a dose of 20 μg/kg (equivalent to 15.2 μg of pergolide/kg) to each horse, and blood samples were collected over 48 hours. Pergolide concentrations in plasma were determined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry, and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined on the basis of noncompartmental methods.

RESULTS After IV administration of pergolide, mean ± SD clearance, elimination half-life, and initial volume of distribution were 959 ± 492 mL/h/kg, 5.64 ± 2.36 hours, and 0.79 ± 0.32 L/kg, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE With an elimination half-life of approximately 6 hours, twice-daily dosing may be more appropriate than once-daily dosing to reduce peak-trough fluctuation in pergolide concentrations. Further pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies of pergolide and its metabolites will be necessary to determine plasma concentrations that correlate with clinical effectiveness to determine the therapeutic range for the treatment of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics of cefovecin sodium after SC administration to Hermann's tortoises (Testudo hermanni).

Animals—23 healthy adult Hermann's tortoises (15 males and 8 females).

Procedures—Cefovecin (8.0 mg/kg) was injected once in the subcutis of the neck region of Hermann's tortoises, and blood samples were obtained at predetermined time points. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were measured via ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated with a noncompartmental model. Plasma protein concentration was quantified, and the percentage of cefovecin bound to protein was estimated with a centrifugation technique.

Results—Cefovecin was absorbed rapidly, reaching maximum plasma concentrations between 35 minutes and 2 hours after administration, with the exception of 1 group, in which it was reached after 4 hours. The mean ± SD time to maximum concentration was 1.22 ± 1.14 hours; area under the concentration-time curve was 220.35 ± 36.18 h•μg/mL The mean protein-bound fraction of cefovecin ranged from 41.3% to 47.5%. No adverse effects were observed.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of a single dose of cefovecin SC appeared to be well-tolerated in this population of tortoises. Results of pharmacokinetic analysis indicated that the 2-week dosing interval suggested for dogs and cats cannot be considered effective in tortoises; however, further research is needed to determine therapeutic concentrations of the drug and appropriate dose ranges.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA) following SC administration of a single dose to sheep.

Animals—9 healthy adult female Suffolk-crossbred sheep.

Procedures—Each sheep was administered 6.6 mg of CCFA/kg, SC, in the cervical region once. Serial blood samples were collected at predetermined intervals for 14 days. Serum concentration of ceftiofur free-acid equivalents (CFAE) was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by compartmental and noncompartmental methods.

Results—Pharmacokinetics for CCFA following SC administration in sheep was best described with a 1-compartment model. Mean ± SD area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity, peak serum concentration, and time to peak serum concentration were 206.6 ± 24.8 μ•h/mL, 2.4 ± 0.5 μg/mL, and 23.1 ± 10.1 h, respectively. Serum CFAE concentrations ≥ 1 μg/mL (the target serum CFAE concentration for treatment of disease caused by Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida) were maintained for 2.6 to 4.9 days. No significant adverse reactions to CCFA administration were observed.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that adequate therapeutic serum concentrations of CFAE for treatment of disease caused by M haemolytica and P multocida were achieved in sheep following SC administration of a single dose (6.6 mg/kg) of CCFA. Thus, CCFA might be useful for the treatment of common respiratory tract pathogens in sheep.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research