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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of dobutamine, esmolol, milrinone, and phenylephrine on left atrial phasic function of healthy dogs.

ANIMALS 9 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES Following sedation with propofol on each of 4 experimental days, dogs were administered a constant rate infusion of dobutamine (5 μg/kg/min), esmolol (500 μg/kg/min), milrinone (25 μg/kg, IV bolus, followed by 0.5 μg/kg/min), or phenylephrine (2 μg/kg/min). There was at least a 14-day interval between experimental days. Each drug was administered to 6 dogs. Conventional and 2-D speckle tracking echocardiography were performed before (baseline) and after administration of the cardiovascular drug, and time–left atrial area curves were derived to calculate indices for left atrial reservoir, conduit, and booster pump functions (left atrial phasic function) and left ventricular contractility and lusitropy.

RESULTS Compared with baseline values, indices for left atrial reservoir and booster pump functions and left ventricular contractility and lusitropy were significantly increased following dobutamine administration; indices for left atrial phasic function and left ventricular lusitropy were changed insignificantly, and indices for left ventricular contractility were significantly impaired following esmolol administration; indices for left atrial phasic function and left ventricular relaxation were changed insignificantly, and indices for left ventricular systolic function were significantly augmented following milrinone administration; and indices for left atrial phasic function and left ventricular lusitropy were changed insignificantly, and indices of ventricular contractility were significantly impaired following phenylephrine administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that, following administration of dobutamine, esmolol, milrinone, or phenylephrine to healthy dogs, left atrial phasic function indices were fairly stable and did not parallel changes in left ventricular function indices.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To generate reference intervals for ECG variables in clinically normal chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

ANIMALS 100 clinically normal (51 young [< 10 years old] and 49 adult [≥ 10 years old]) wild-born chimpanzees.

PROCEDURES Electrocardiograms collected between 2009 and 2013 at the Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Centre were assessed to determine heart rate, PR interval, QRS duration, QT interval, QRS axis, P axis, and T axis. Electrocardiographic characteristics for left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and morphology of the ST segment, T wave, and QRS complex were identified. Reference intervals for young and old animals were calculated as mean ± 1.96•SD for normally distributed data and as 5th to 95th percentiles for data not normally distributed. Differences between age groups were assessed by use of unpaired Student t tests.

RESULTS Reference intervals were generated for young and adult wild-born chimpanzees. Most animals had sinus rhythm with small or normal P wave morphology; 24 of 51 (47%) young chimpanzees and 30 of 49 (61%) adult chimpanzees had evidence of LVH as determined on the basis of criteria for humans.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Cardiac disease has been implicated as the major cause of death in captive chimpanzees. Species-specific ECG reference intervals for chimpanzees may aid in the diagnosis and treatment of animals with, or at risk of developing, heart disease. Chimpanzees with ECG characteristics outside of these intervals should be considered for follow-up assessment and regular cardiac monitoring.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate serum and plasma serotonin concentrations, percentage of serotonin-positive platelets, level of surface-bound platelet serotonin expression (mean fluorescence intensity [MFI]), and platelet activation (CD62 expression) in platelet-rich plasma from Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD).

ANIMALS Healthy dogs (n = 15) and dogs with mild MMVD (18), moderate-severe MMVD (19), or severe MMVD with congestive heart failure (CHF; 10).

PROCEDURES Blood samples were collected from each dog. Serum and plasma serotonin concentrations were measured with an ELISA, and surface-bound platelet serotonin expression and platelet activation were determined by flow cytometry.

RESULTS Dogs with mild MMVD had higher median serum (746 ng/mL) and plasma (33.3 ng/mL) serotonin concentrations, compared with MMVD-affected dogs with CHF (388 ng/mL and 9.9 ng/mL, respectively), but no other group differences were found. Among disease groups, no differences in surface-bound serotonin expression or platelet activation were found. Thrombocytopenic dogs had lower serum serotonin concentration (482 ng/mL) than nonthrombocytopenic dogs (731 ng/mL). In 26 dogs, a flow cytometry scatterplot subpopulation (FSSP) of platelets was identified; dogs with an FSSP had a higher percentage of serotonin-positive platelets (11.0%), higher level of surface-bound serotonin expression (MFI, 32,068), and higher platelet activation (MFI, 2,363) than did dogs without an FSSP (5.7%, 1,230, and 1,165, respectively). An FSSP was present in 93.8% of thrombocytopenic dogs and in 29.5% of nonthrombocytopenic dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A substantive influence of circulating serotonin on MMVD stages prior to CHF development in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels was not supported by the study findings. An FSSP of highly activated platelets with pronounced serotonin binding was strongly associated with thrombocytopenia but not MMVD.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess the microcirculatory effects of IV fluid administration in healthy anesthetized dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy.

Animals—49 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were sedated, and anesthesia was induced with propofol and diazepam and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Dogs received lactated Ringer's solution (LRS) IV at rates of 0, 10, or 20 mL/kg/h. Videomicroscopy was used to assess and record effects of LRS administration on microcirculation in the buccal mucosa. Measurements of microcirculatory (total vessel density, proportion of perfused vessels, microcirculatory flow index, and perfused vessel density by vessel size [< 20 μm, ≥ 20 μm, and all diameters]) and other physiologic variables (heart rate, Doppler-measured blood pressure, oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry, capillary refill time, and body temperature) were compared among groups at baseline (immediately after anesthetic induction), 30 and 60 minutes afterward, and overall.

Results—Neither the proportion of perfused vessels nor microcirculatory flow index varied among treatment groups at any time point, regardless of vessel size. For vessels < 20 μm in diameter and for all vessels combined, total and perfused vessel density were similar among groups. For vessels ≥ 20 μm in diameter, total vessel density was significantly greater in the 20 mL/kg/h group than in other groups, and perfused vessel density was significantly greater in the 20 mL/kg/h group than in the 0 mL/kg/h group, when all time points were considered. Other physiologic variables were similar among groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Total and perfused vessel density of vessels ≥ 20 μm in diameter (mostly venules) were greatest in dogs that received 20 mL of LRS/kg/h. Further research is required to evaluate clinical importance of these findings.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine minimum plasma concentrations of the antifibrinolytic agents tranexamic acid (TEA) and ϵ-aminocaproic acid (EACA) needed to completely inhibit fibrinolysis in canine and human plasma after induction of hyperfibrinolysis.

Samples—Pooled citrated plasma from 7 dogs and commercial pooled citrated human plasma.

Procedures—Concentrations of EACA from 0 μg/mL to 500 μg/mL and of TEA from 0 μg/mL to 160 μg/mL were added to pooled citrated canine and human plasma. Hyperfibrinolysis was induced with 1,000 units of tissue plasminogen activator/mL, and kaolin-activated thromboelastography was performed in duplicate. The minimum concentrations required to completely inhibit fibrinolysis 30 minutes after maximum amplitude of the thromboelastography tracing occurred were determined.

Results—Minimum plasma concentrations necessary for complete inhibition of fibrinolysis by EACA and TEA in pooled canine plasma were estimated as 511.7 μg/mL (95% confidence interval [CI], 433.2 to 590.3 μg/mL) and 144.7 μg/mL (95% CI, 125.2 to 164.2 μg/mL), respectively. Concentrations of EACA and TEA necessary for complete inhibition of fibrinolysis in pooled human plasma were estimated as 122.0 μg/mL (95% CI, 106.2 to 137.8 μg/mL) and 14.7 μg/mL (95% CI, 13.7 to 15.6 μg/mL), respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results supported the concept that dogs are hyperfibrinolytic, compared with humans. Higher doses of EACA and TEA may be required to fully inhibit fibrinolysis in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess the accuracy of an ultrasound velocity dilution cardiac output (UDCO) method, compared with that of the lithium dilution cardiac output (LiDCO) method, for determination of cardiac output (CO) in juvenile horses with experimentally induced hypovolemia.

Animals—12 anesthetized 2- to 6-month-old horses.

Procedures—For each anesthetized horse, CO was determined by the LiDCO and UDCO methods prior to any intervention (baseline state), after withdrawal of approximately 40% of the horse's blood volume (low CO state), after maintenance of hypovolemia and infusion of norepinephrine until mean arterial blood pressure was equal to baseline value (high CO state), and after further infusion of norepinephrine and back-transfusion of withdrawn blood (posttransfusion state). For each of the 4 hemodynamic situations, CO and calculated cardiac index (CI) values were obtained by each method in duplicate (8 pairs of measurements/horse); mean values for each horse and overall mean values across all horses were calculated. Agreement between CI determined by each method (96 paired values) was assessed by Bland-Altman analysis.

Results—For the UDCO method–derived CI measurements among the 12 horses, mean ± SD bias was −4 ± 11.3 mL/kg/min (95% limits of agreement, −26.1 to 18.2 mL/kg/min) and mean relative bias was −10.4 ± 21.5% (95% limits of agreement, −52.6% to 31.8%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that, compared with the LiDCO method, the UDCO method has acceptable clinical usefulness for determination of CO in foals.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of protamine sulfate on clot formation time and clot strength thromboelastography variables for canine whole blood samples.

Animals—Blood samples obtained from 11 healthy dogs.

Procedures—Blood samples were collected from jugular veins of dogs into syringes with 3.2% sodium citrate (blood to citrate ratio, 9:1). Blood samples were divided into aliquots, and protamine sulfate was added to various concentrations (0 [control], 22, 44, and 66 μg/mL). Prepared samples were activated with kaolin (n = 8) or not activated (8), CaCl2 was added, and thromboelastography was performed. Reaction time (R), clot formation time (K), rate of clot formation (α angle), and maximum amplitude (MA) were measured.

Results—For kaolin-activated and nonactivated blood samples, protamine (66 μg/mL) significantly increased R and K and decreased α angle and MA, compared with values for control samples. Also, protamine (44 μg/mL) decreased MA in nonactivated blood samples and increased K and decreased α angle in kaolin-activated samples, compared with values for control samples.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated protamine prolonged clot formation time and decreased overall clot strength in a dose-dependent manner; such effects may contribute to a hypocoagulable state in dogs. Kaolin-activated and nonactivated blood samples were appropriate for measurement of the effects of protamine on coagulation. Administration of protamine to reverse the effects of heparin should be performed with caution.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To characterize the electrocardiographic features of the atrial repolarization (Ta) wave in dogs with third-degree atrioventricular (AV) block.

Sample—ECGs of 36 dogs with third-degree AV block and no identifiable structural heart diseases.

Procedures—Standard 12-lead ECGs were acquired with a digital system, and measurements were manually edited.

Results—A Ta wave was detectable in all dogs for at least 1 ECG lead. The Ta wave had negative polarity in leads I, II, III, and aVF and positive polarity in leads aVL and aVR, with a mean electrical axis of −114.26°. Mean duration and mean amplitude of the Ta wave in lead II were 140.2 milliseconds and −0.09 mV, respectively, with the ratio for the Ta-to-P wave duration of 2.3 and the ratio of Ta-to-P wave amplitude of −0.35. Significant correlations were found between the Ta wave duration and duration of the P-Ta interval, Ta wave amplitude and the ECG lead, Ta wave duration and body weight, and duration of the P-Ta interval and atrial rate. Measurements of the Ta wave were repeatable.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Measurements of the Ta wave in dogs with third-degree AV block were repeatable. The values for the Ta wave reported here can be used as reference values for dogs with AV conduction disturbances and an echocardiographically normal atrial size. Further studies are needed to validate these results in dogs with structural heart diseases.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate tissue oxygen saturation (Sto 2) by use of near-infrared spectroscopy in experimental acute hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in dogs.

Animals—14 healthy adult purpose-bred Beagles.

Procedures—Dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane via facemask, anesthesia was maintained with propofol and rocuronium bromide, and dogs were mechanically ventilated to maintain normocapnia. Dogs were studied under normovolemia (baseline), hypovolemia with target mean arterial blood pressure < 40 mm Hg achieved and maintained steady for 10 minutes (hypovolemia T1), then 20 minutes later (hypovolemia T2), following resuscitation with shed blood (after transfusion), and after administration of 20 mL of hetastarch/kg (hypervolemia). Conditions were executed sequentially during a single anesthetic episode, allowing stabilization between states (10 minutes). Hemoglobin concentration, mean arterial blood pressure, arterial blood gas concentrations, cardiac index, oxygen delivery indexed to body surface area, and Sto 2 were monitored.

Results—From baseline to hypovolemia T1, there was a significant reduction in mean ± SD oxygen delivery index (619 ± 257 mL/min/m2 to 205 ± 76 mL/min/m2) and StO2 (94 ± 4.4% to 78 ± 12.2%). Following resuscitation, Sto 2 (80 ± 8.5% vs 92 ± 6.45%) and oxygen delivery index (211 ± 73 mL/min/m2 vs 717 ± 221 mL/min/m2) significantly increased, returning to baseline values. Hypervolemia had no effect on Sto 2 or oxygen delivery index. A strong correlation (r = 0.97) was detected between mean oxygen delivery index and Sto 2 across all time points.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Under the conditions of this study, there was a strong correlation between Sto 2 and oxygen delivery, suggesting that Sto 2 may be used to estimate oxygen delivery.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess the feasibility and reproducibility of longitudinal tissue Doppler ultrasonographic imaging with regard to determination of velocity, strain, and strain rate (SR) of the left atrium (LA) and use those data to characterize LA synchrony (LAS) for a group of healthy dogs.

Animals—15 healthy dogs.

Procedures—For each dog, apical 4- and 2-chamber echocardiographic views were obtained. Peak velocity, strain, and SR and time to peak value during systole, early diastole, and late diastole were measured for each of the 4 LA walls. To characterize LAS, mean and SD maximal late diastolic time difference (LAD) among the 4 walls were calculated on the basis of time to peak for velocity, strain, and SR; for each, the 95% confidence interval (mean ± 2SD) was calculated. Within-day and between-day intraobserver variability was calculated.

Results—For all dogs, tissue velocity and SR had peak positive values during systole and 2 negative peaks during early and late diastole. Atrial strain had a peak positive value during systole, positive values during early diastole, and a negative peak value during late diastole. Reproducibility was acceptable for most variables. Diastolic strain and SR had the highest variability, but times to peak values were always reproducible. For velocity, strain, and SR, the 95% confidence interval for the maximal LAD was < 50 milliseconds and that for the SD of the LAD was < 23 milliseconds.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Longitudinal tissue Doppler imaging of LA deformation was feasible in healthy dogs, and its application may be useful for understanding atrial pathophysiologic changes associated with various cardiac diseases in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research