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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the serum cobalamin concentrations in canine parvovirus (CPV)–infected dogs with those of healthy control dogs.

Animals

45 dogs with CPV enteritis and 17 healthy age-matched control dogs.

Procedures

Infection was confirmed by visualization of CPV-2 through fecal electron microscopy. All dogs received supportive care. Serum samples taken at admission were used to determine cobalamin, C-reactive protein, and albumin concentrations.

Results

Serum cobalamin concentrations were significantly lower in the CPV-infected group (median [interquartile range], 173 pmol/L [< 111 to 722 pmol/L]) than in healthy control dogs (379 pmol/L [193 to > 738 pmol/L). There was no association between cobalamin concentration and C-reactive protein or albumin concentration.

Clinical Relevance

While hypocobalaminemia was common in CPV-infected dogs, the clinical relevance of this finding remains to be determined. Studies assessing markers of cellular cobalamin deficiency in dogs with CPV infection appear warranted.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the outcome of surgical fixation of shell fractures in rehabilitated wild freshwater turtles.

ANIMALS

51 freshwater turtles with 86 shell fractures.

PROCEDURES

The medical record database of a wildlife rehabilitation center in Wisconsin was searched from 2014 through 2019 for records of freshwater turtles with shell fractures repaired with a plate technique, screws and wire technique, or both. Signalment, fracture location, therapeutic approach (including the type of hardware used for repair), dry-docking duration, time to hardware removal, postremoval care, and outcome were evaluated.

RESULTS

36 of 51 (71%) turtles with shell fractures experienced successful fracture healing following surgical hardware fixation, and 33 (65%) were released. Shells of 38 (75%) turtles were repaired with plates only, 5 (10%) turtles with wire only, and 8 (16%) turtles with a combination of plates and screws and wires. Of the 51 turtles, 13 (25%) did not survive > 4 weeks following hardware repair, leaving 38 animals available to assess fracture healing. Median time to start staged removal was 42 days (range, 35 to 49 days) and to complete removal of the applied hardware was 56 days (range, 26 to 77 days). Complications associated with placement of the hardware occurred in 6 of 38 (16%) turtles. Complications included screw hole infection (4/38 [11%]), fracture necrosis (1/38 [3%]), and deep screw hole penetration (1/38 [3%]).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that shell fractures in freshwater turtles treated with surgical fixation techniques had a successful outcome. Most complications were minor, and fractures improved with time, resulting in acceptable fracture healing for release.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether plasma cardiac troponin I (cTnl) concentrations can be used to identify cardiac involvement in dogs with hemangiosarcoma, exclude cardiac hemangiosarcoma in dogs with noncardiac hemangiosarcoma, and identify cardiac hemangiosarcoma in dogs with pericardial effusion.

Design—Cohort study

Animals—57 dogs (18 with confirmed [5 dogs] or suspected [13] cardiac hemangiosarcoma, 14 with confirmed hemangiosarcoma involving sites other than the heart [noncardiac hemangiosarcoma], 10 with pericardial effusion not caused by hemangiosarcoma, and 15 with noncardiac nonhemangiosarcoma neoplasms).

Procedures—Plasma cTnl concentration was measured, and thoracic radiography, abdominal ultrasonography, and echocardiography were performed in each dog. The cTnl concentration was compared among groups.

Results—Median plasma cTnl concentration in dogs with cardiac hemangiosarcoma was significantly higher than the concentration in each of the other groups. A plasma cTnl concentration > 0.25 ng/mL could be used to identify cardiac involvement in dogs with hemangiosarcoma at any site (sensitivity, 78%; specificity, 71 %). A plasma cTnl concentration > 0.25 ng/mL could be used to identify cardiac hemangiosarcoma in dogs with pericardia effusion (sensitivity, 81%; specificity, 100%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The median plasma cTnl concentration was higher in dogs with cardiac hemangiosarcoma, compared with the median concentration in dogs with hemangiosarcoma at other sites, dogs with other neoplasms, and dogs with pericardial effusion not caused by hemangiosarcoma. The plasma cTnl concentration may be used to identify cardiac involvement in dogs with hemangiosarcoma and to identify cardiac hemangiosarcoma in dogs with pericardial effusion. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2010;237:806–811)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association