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Lateralization of the diaphragm

I enjoyed reading the article by Gilman and Ogden, 1 and I commend the authors for bringing to light a useful technique that seems to have been swallowed by time and likely is not widely known as a viable option for select cases. It is unfortunate the authors and reviewers were unaware of an almost identical report 2 my 2 coauthors and I published in the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association in 2010.

It would be great to see a published report on a series of these cases, because they

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Parkinson disease and the veterinary profession

I am a 78-year-old veterinarian who, 2 years ago, began taking carbidopa-levodopa for treatment of Parkinson disease (PD). Parkinson disease is the fastest-growing neurologic disorder in the world, estimated to have affected 6.3 million people in 2015 and expected to affect up to 12.9 million people by 2040. 1

About 10% of PD cases are thought to be related to genetics, with PD in young people more likely to be genetic in origin than PD in senior citizens, and some cases of PD are related to head trauma. 1 However, data overwhelmingly suggest

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Resilience matters

I want to thank Perret et al 1 for their recent report identifying factors associated with resilience in veterinarians. This is a timely topic for me, because in the past year I have had to go to my well of resilience on several occasions, and fortunately, I found it to be quite full. The authors refer to previous definitions that describe resilience as “a positive response to adversity, such that an individual is at least coping, if not thriving,” and a “stress-coping ability.” I would take it a step further and describe resilience as finding meaning and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Maintaining normothermia is critical to safe anesthesia

The recent JAVMA News article “There are only safe anesthetists” 1 correctly notes the higher prevalence of untoward anesthetic outcomes in veterinary versus human medicine, but it misses a critical risk mitigation strategy: maintaining normothermia throughout the perianesthetic period. Hypothermia is a routine anesthesia-related consequence that is a major factor in postanesthetic death, and the use of active measures to facilitate normothermia during anesthetic episodes is now the standard of care in human medicine. Even if a hypothermic patient survives, there are often other untoward effects, and measures to restore

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Concentrating on students to improve antimicrobial stewardship

In their recent letter,

Sullivan et al 1 suggest that further attention should be focused on educating veterinary students on antimicrobial resistance and the principles of antimicrobial stewardship. However, in my more than 50-year career, I have seen little improvement in antimicrobial use, and I doubt changing the training that veterinary students receive would have a substantial impact. This would especially seem to be the case because veterinarians learn most of their clinical skills after leaving veterinary school.

When it comes to anti-microbial use, many veterinary practitioners default to what they have

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Talking internships

In a recent JAVMA News story 1 about the AVMA House of Delegates Veterinary Information Forum this past July, it was reported that the discussion touched on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on veterinary student learning; one delegate suggested that it will be important for practitioners to work on being mentors for recent graduates, saying “We're going to be filling in gaps down the road … For the next several years, this will have a ripple effect on their education.” Let's be clear: no one is done with learning when they graduate from veterinary

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Authors Erin Frey and Megan Jacob

Companion animal veterinarians regularly examine patients with bacterial infections of the urinary tract and skin and commonly prescribe antimicrobial drugs empirically for treatment. However, the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in companion animal practice complicates the initial choice of antimicrobial drugs because it is harder to predict which will be efficacious. Although the combination of culture and AST of patient samples is useful when choosing antimicrobial treatments, the cost and time lag between when samples are collected and when results are available are barriers to performing these tests. 1 A 2015 AVMA member survey 2 noted that 84% of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Dr. Gordon Theilen: on one former student's “Mount Rushmore” of veterinarians

I read with appreciation the comments reflecting on the career of Dr. Gordon Theilen, 1 one of the grandparents of small animal veterinary medicine and specialization (I was 8 years old when he graduated from veterinary school). At the beginning of my third year of veterinary training, I transferred to the University of California-Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, joining the class of 1973. One of my first lecturers there was Dr. Theilen. My memories of his enthusiasm and obvious desire for each of us to share his joy

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Racial bias

I read with interest the recent JAVMA News article “Veterinary colleges committed to anti-racism, say Black lives matter.” 1 The AVMA is to be commended for bringing this matter to the attention of its members. Unequivocally, Black lives matter. Racial bias should not exist.

According to Shipman, 2 DNA evidence indicates that we are all Africans. It makes physiologic sense that everyone residing near or on the equator would be Black because of the greater intensity of UV light.

Growing up on a farm without electricity or indoor plumbing during the 1930s, the time

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Wants information on gender-associated salary differences

We commend the AVMA Veterinary Economics Division for publishing important data about the profession, as exemplified by “Employment, starting salaries, and educational indebtedness of year-2019 graduates of US veterinary medical colleges.” 1 Prior to 2014, however, JAVMA also published annually information about gender-associated differences in starting salaries (overall and by practice type), number of job offers received, and employment benefits offered. 2 This most recent report did not include salary data by gender, and we believe this lack of gender-associated salary data is a disservice to the profession. Veterinarians need

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association