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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate intrasession and intersession repeatability of measurements for temporospatial and kinetic variables obtained with a pressure-sensitive treadmill designed for gait analysis of dogs.

ANIMALS

16 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

The influence of treadmill speed on accuracy of ground reaction force (GRF) measurements was assessed by simulated gait analysis at 0 to 7.5 km/h with a custom test device. A similar test was performed with 1 client-owned dog ambulating on the treadmill at 5 speeds (3 to 7 km/h) for GRF calculations. Fifteen client-owned dogs were then walked on the treadmill at 3 km/h for collection of temporospatial and kinetic data. Intrasession repeatability was determined by comparing 2 sets of measurements obtained ≤ 2 hours apart. Intersession repeatability was determined by comparing the first set of these measurements with those for a second session ≥ 4 days later. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs; consistency test) and difference ratios were calculated to assess repeatability.

RESULTS

Increases in treadmill speed yielded a mean 9.1% decrease in weight-normalized force data at belt speeds of up to 7.5 km/h for the test device, compared with the value when the treadmill belt was stationary. Results were similar for the dog at increasing treadmill speeds (mean decrease, 12.4%). For temporospatial data, intrasession ICCs were > 0.9 and intersession ICCs ranged from 0.75 to 0.9; for GRFs, intrasession and intersession ICCs ranged from 0.68 to 0.97 and from 0.35 to 0.78, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Repeatability of temporospatial data for healthy dogs was good to excellent; results for kinetic data varied. Further research is needed to investigate use of this system for gait analysis with larger samples of dogs and dogs with lameness.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To use the small data approach of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) to evaluate the transferability of reference intervals (RIs) for kinetic variables obtained with instrumented gait analysis (IGA) in dogs from an RI-originator laboratory to another laboratory that used the same data acquisition and analytic techniques for IGA in walking dogs.

ANIMALS

27 adult client-owned dogs without evidence of lameness.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were individually walked at their preferred velocity on a pressure-sensing walkway for IGA at the Colorado State University Animal Gait Laboratory (CSU-AGL), and 6 valid trials were analyzed for each dog. The small data approach of the CLSI was then used to evaluate transferability of RIs previously established at the Purdue University Animal Gait Laboratory (PU-AGL). A linear model was used to establish weight-dependent RIs for peak vertical force (PVF).

RESULTS

Results indicated that RIs of dynamic weight distribution (DWD), DWD symmetry index, DWD coefficient of variation, PVF symmetry index, and PVF coefficient of variation were transferable from PU-AGL to CSU-AGL, whereas the weight-dependent RIs for PVF were not. Regression slopes for PVF versus body weight were greater for all limbs in dogs tested at the CSU-AGL, compared with historic results for dogs tested at the PU-AGL.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Use of the small data approach method of the CLSI to validate transference of RIs for IGA kinetic variables in walking dogs was simple and efficient to perform and may help facilitate clinical and research collaborations on gait analysis.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effect of suture caliber on the tensile strength of tenorrhaphies performed with a locking-loop technique in cadaveric canine tendons

SAMPLE

60 superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFTs) from 30 cadaveric adult dogs.

PROCEDURES

Transverse tenotomy was performed, and SDFTs were repaired with a locking-loop technique and polypropylene suture of 5 randomly assigned calibers: size-0, 2-0, 3-0, 4-0, or 5-0 (n = 12 SDFTs/suture caliber). Tendon constructs were tested to failure. Yield, peak, and failure forces and causes of failure were compared between groups.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD failure force for the constructs was significantly greater with large-caliber suture (size-0: 73.5 ± 3.1 N; size 2-0: 54.4 ± 7.1 N; size 3-0: 28.7 ± 4.9 N; size 4-0: 18.7 ± 3.4 N; and size 5-0: 8.8 ± 2.8 N). The likelihood of construct failure by suture pullout through the tendon substance increased with large-caliber suture (size-0: 12/12), whereas the likelihood of construct failure by suture breakage increased with small-caliber suture (2-0: 10/12; 3-0, 4-0, and 5-0: 12/12 each).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Large-caliber suture had greater tensile strength for tenorrhaphies performed with a locking-loop technique in cadaveric canine tendons. Prior to the use of large-caliber suture in patients requiring tenorrhaphy, however, in vivo studies are required to confirm the results obtained here.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the torsional mechanical properties of 2 external skeletal fixators (ESFs) placed with 2 intramedullary pin (IP) and transfixation pin (TP) size combinations in a model of raptor tibiotarsal bone fracture.

SAMPLE

24 ESF-synthetic tibiotarsal bone model (polyoxymethylene) constructs.

PROCEDURES

Synthetic bone models were fabricated with an 8-mm (simulated fracture) gap. Four types of ESF-synthetic bone model constructs (6/group) were tested: a FESSA with a 1.6-mm IP and 1.6-mm TPs, a FESSA with a 2.0-mm IP and 1.1-mm TPs, an acrylic connecting bar with a 1.6-mm IP and 1.6-mm TPs, and an acrylic connecting bar with a 2.0-mm IP and 1.1-mm TPs. Models were rotated in torsion (5°/s) to failure or the machine angle limit (80°). Mechanical variables at yield and at failure were determined from load deformation curves. Effects of overall construct type, connecting bar type, and IP and TP size combination on mechanical properties were assessed with mixed-model ANOVAs.

RESULTS

Both FESSA constructs had significantly greater median stiffness and median torque at yield than both acrylic bar constructs; FESSA constructs with a 1.6-mm IP and 1.6-mm TPs had greatest stiffness of all tested constructs and lowest gap strain at yield. No FESSA constructs failed during testing; 7 of 12 acrylic bar constructs failed by fracture of the connecting bar at the interface with a TP.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Although acrylic bar ESFs have been successfully used in avian patients, the FESSA constructs in this study were mechanically superior to acrylic bar constructs, with greatest benefit resulting from use with the larger TP configuration.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effect of presurgical storage conditions on leakage pressures of enterotomy sites closed with unidirectional barbed suture material in fresh, chilled, and frozen-thawed cadaveric canine jejunal specimens.

SAMPLE

36 grossly normal jejunal segments obtained from 4 dog cadavers.

PROCEDURES

9 jejunal segments were harvested immediately from each euthanized dog and randomly assigned to be tested within 4 hours after collection (fresh segments), stored at 4°C for 24 hours before testing (chilled segments), or stored at −20°C for 7 days and thawed at 21°C for 6 hours before testing (frozen-thawed segments). For leakage pressure testing, a 3-cm-long antimesenteric enterotomy was performed and repaired with 3-0 unidirectional barbed suture material in a simple continuous pattern in each segment. Time to complete the enterotomy, initial leakage pressure, maximum intraluminal pressure, and leakage location were recorded for each segment.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD initial leakage pressure for fresh, chilled, and frozen-thawed segments was 52.8 ± 14.9 mm Hg, 51.8 ± 11.9 mm Hg, and 33.3 ± 7.7 mm Hg, respectively. Frozen-thawed segments had significantly lower mean initial leakage pressure, compared with findings for fresh or chilled segments. Time to complete the enterotomy, maximum intraluminal pressure, and leakage location did not differ among groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Leak pressure testing of cadaveric jejunal segments that are fresh or chilled at 4°C for 24 hours is recommended for enterotomy studies involving barbed suture material in dogs. Freezing and thawing of cadaveric jejunal tissues prior to investigative use is not recommended because leak pressure data may be falsely low.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To develop a 3-D kinematic model to measure truncal motion in dogs and assess changes in truncal motion in dogs when wearing each of 2 service vests.

ANIMALS

5 adult mixed-breed dogs.

PROCEDURES

27 reflective markers were placed on the pelvis, trunk, and scapula of each dog. Six infrared cameras were placed around a treadmill to track the location of the markers within a calibrated space. Dogs were recorded during walking and trotting on the treadmill. Local and global coordinate systems were established, and a segmental rigid-body model of the trunk was created. Dogs were then recorded while wearing a custom vest and an adjustable vest during walking and trotting on the treadmill. Range of motion of the trunk when dogs were and were not wearing vests was compared by repeated-measures ANOVA.

RESULTS

An anatomic coordinate system was established by use of markers located at T1, T13, and the xiphoid process. Range of motion of the trunk during a gait cycle did not differ significantly regardless of the day of the test for both walking and trotting gaits. Trunk motion of dogs when walking and trotting was significantly reduced when dogs were wearing a vest, compared with trunk motion when not wearing a vest.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

A 3-D kinematic model for measuring truncal rotation was developed. Results indicated measurable differences in the gait of dogs when wearing each of the 2 service vests, compared with the gait when not wearing a vest.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effects of 2 augmentation techniques on the mechanical properties of titanium cannulated bone screws.

SAMPLE

33 titanium cannulated bone screws (outer diameter, 6.5 mm; guide channel diameter, 3.6 mm).

PROCEDURES

11 screws were allocated to each of 3 groups. The guide channel of each screw was filled with polymethyl methacrylate bone cement alone (OCS group) or in combination with a 3.2-mm-diameter orthopedic pin (PCS group) or remained unmodified (control group) before mechanical testing. Each screw underwent a single-cycle 3-point bending test to failure with a monotonic loading rate of 2.5 mm/min. Failure was defined as an acute decrease in resistance to load of ≥ 20% or a bending deformation of 15 mm. Mechanical properties were determined for each screw and compared among the 3 groups.

RESULTS

All screws in the control and OCS groups and 1 screw in the PCS group broke during testing; a 15-mm bending deformation was achieved for the remaining 10 screws in the PCS group. Maximum load and load at failure differed significantly among the 3 groups. Stiffness and load at yield for the PCS group were significantly greater than those for the control and OCS groups but did not differ between the control and OCS groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Use of bone cement and an orthopedic pin to fill the guide channel of cannulated screws significantly increased the strength of the construct, but ex vivo and in vivo studies are necessary before this augmentation technique can be recommended for clinical patients.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the elastic modulus of various ligaments of the forelimbs of cadaveric horses.

SAMPLE

408 ligaments from 37 forelimbs of 10 Thoroughbred cadavers and cadavers of 9 other horse breeds.

PROCEDURES

Collateral ligaments and straight and oblique sesamoid ligaments were harvested from the proximal interphalangeal, metacarpophalangeal, carpal, and elbow joints of both forelimbs of all 19 horses. Ligament dimensions were measured, and the elastic modulus was determined by tensile testing the ligaments with a strain rate of 1 mm•s−1.

RESULTS

Elastic modulus of the ligaments differed significantly among joints. Highest mean ± SE elastic modulus was for the medial collateral ligament of the metacarpophalangeal joints of Thoroughbreds (68.3 ± 11.0 MPa), and the lowest was for the lateral collateral ligament of the elbow joints of other breeds (2.8 ± 0.3 MPa). Thoroughbreds had a significantly higher elastic modulus for the collateral ligaments of the proximal interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joints, compared with values for the other breeds. There was large variation in elastic modulus. Elastic modulus was negatively affected by age. In the ligaments in the distal aspect of the forelimbs, elastic modulus was negatively affected by height at the highest point of the shoulders (ie, withers).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Cross-sectional area and elastic modulus of collateral ligaments in the forelimbs of equine cadavers differed between breeds and among joints, which may have been reflective of their relative physiologic function under loading during exercise.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the degree of white line separation created by increasing physiologic loads between bovine claws with and without toe-tip necrosis (TTN).

SAMPLE

Cadaveric bovine hind limbs with (n = 10) and without (10) TTN.

PROCEDURES

Hind limbs in which 1 or both claws had evidence of apical white line separation were considered to have TTN. Hind limbs in which neither claw had evidence of white line separation were considered controls. Each hind limb was mounted in a materials testing system with the bottom surface of the hoof angled at approximately 5° to the horizontal plane such that the apex of the claws made initial contact with the clear testing surface to simulate physiologic loading conditions. A digital camera mounted underneath the testing surface was used to obtain images of the bottom of the hoof during the application of each of 3 increasing static loads (1, 2, and 3 kN). The images were analyzed with commercial image-processing software to quantify white line separation area.

RESULTS

White line separation area was significantly greater for claws with TTN than for control claws and increased as the applied load increased. White line separation was almost nonexistent in control claws and was not affected by increasing load.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that mechanical loading exacerbated TTN, but compressive loading alone, even at excessive levels, did not initiate the condition. Interventions (eg, hoof blocks) that decrease loading of affected claws may be beneficial for the treatment of TTN at its earliest stages.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate and quantify the kinematic behavior of canine mandibles before and after bilateral rostral or unilateral segmental mandibulectomy as well as after mandibular reconstruction with a locking reconstruction plate in ex vivo conditions.

SAMPLE

Head specimens from cadavers of 16 dogs (range in body weight, 30 to 35 kg).

PROCEDURE

Specimens were assigned to undergo unilateral segmental (n = 8) or bilateral rostral (8) mandibulectomy and then mandibular reconstruction by internal fixation with locking plates. Kinematic markers were attached to each specimen in a custom-built load frame. Markers were tracked in 3-D space during standardized loading conditions, and mandibular motions were quantified. Differences in mandibular range of motion among 3 experimental conditions (before mandibulectomy [ie, with mandibles intact], after mandibulectomy, and after reconstruction) were assessed by means of repeated-measures ANOVA.

RESULTS

Both unilateral segmental and bilateral rostral mandibulectomy resulted in significantly greater mandibular motion and instability, compared with results for intact mandibles. No significant differences in motion were detected between mandibles reconstructed after unilateral segmental mandibulectomy and intact mandibles. Similarly, the motion of mandibles reconstructed after rostral mandibulectomy was no different from that of intact mandibles, except in the lateral direction.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Mandibular kinematics in head specimens from canine cadavers were significantly altered after unilateral segmental and bilateral rostral mandibulectomy. These alterations were corrected after mandibular reconstruction with locking reconstruction plates. Findings reinforced the clinical observations of the beneficial effect of reconstruction on mandibular function and the need for reconstructive surgery after mandibulectomy in dogs.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research