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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) on elution properties of plaster of Paris (POP).

Sample Population—27 POP cylinders, 27 POP spheres, and 9 polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) spheres.

Procedures—Pellets were loaded with gentamicin (50 mg/g) and divided into 7 groups of 9 beads each: PMMA spheres; POP cylinders coated with 0, 4, or 8 layers of SIS; and POP spheres coated with 0, 4, or 8 layers of SIS. Gentamicin concentration was measured 6, 12, 18, 24, 32, 40, and 48 hours and 3, 4, 5, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 days after wrapping. Porosity was evaluated via scanning electron microscopy. Curvature factor of elution curves, total amount of drug released (TDR), time required to reach 50% of total release (TDRt50), and number of days with concentrations ≥ 1 μg/mL were compared among groups.

Results—SIS decreased the curvature factor and increased the TDRt50 and TDR of POP spheres and cylinders. Curvature factor of the PMMA-release curve remained lower than that for any POP group, but all POP groups wrapped in SIS released more gentamicin than PMMA spheres. Gentamicin concentrations remained ≥ 1 μg/mL in SIS-wrapped POP and PMMA groups throughout the study. Wrapping POP in SIS minimized the increase in porosity of pellets.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Wrapping POP with SIS slows the release and increases the amount of gentamicin leaching from spheres and cylinders. All groups wrapped in SIS maintained antimicrobial concentrations greater than the minimum inhibitory concentration of most pathogens.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate bioavailability and other pharmacokinetic variables of a commercial formulation of ivermectin after IV administration to sheep.

Animals—6 healthy adult sheep.

Procedures—A single dose of a commercial formulation of ivermectin (200 μg/kg) was administered IV to each sheep. After a washout period of 3 weeks, each sheep was administered ivermectin by SC injection. Plasma samples were obtained for up to 36 and up to 42 days after IV and SC administration, respectively. Ivermectin concentrations were quantified by use of high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

Results—Results obtained indicated that after IV administration, ivermectin is cleared slowly from plasma, tends to distribute and accumulate in the peripheral compartment, and is slowly eliminated from the body. After SC administration, noncompartmental analysis revealed that bioavailability of ivermectin is nearly complete (98.20%), has a slow mean absorption time of 0.96 days, and reaches a maximum plasma concentration of 19.55 ng/mL at 3.13 days.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The commercial formulation of ivermectin used in this study can be administered SC to sheep on the basis of a nearly complete bioavailability. In addition, the maximum plasma concentration and interval from SC injection until maximum plasma concentration is obtained are higher than those reported by other authors who used other routes of administration.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of injection with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) followed by oral administration of an NSAID on the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of healthy dogs.

Animals—6 healthy Walker Hounds.

Procedures—In a randomized, crossover design, dogs were administered 4 treatments consisting of an SC injection of an NSAID or control solution (day 0), followed by oral administration of an NSAID or inert substance for 4 days (days 1 through 4). Treatment regimens included carprofen (4 mg/kg) followed by inert substance; saline (0.9% NaCl) solution followed by deracoxib (4 mg/kg); carprofen (4 mg/kg) followed by carprofen (4 mg/kg); and carprofen (4 mg/kg) followed by deracoxib (4 mg/kg). Hematologic, serum biochemical, and fecal evaluations were conducted weekly, and clinical scores were obtained daily. Endoscopy of the GIT was performed before and on days 1, 2, and 5 for each treatment. Lesions were scored by use of a 6-point scale.

Results—No significant differences existed for clinical data, clinicopathologic data, or lesion scores in the esophagus, cardia, or duodenum. For the gastric fundus, antrum, and lesser curvature, an effect of time was observed for all treatments, with lesions worsening from before to day 2 of treatments but improving by day 5.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Sequential administration of NSAIDs in this experiment did not result in clinically important gastroduodenal ulcers. A larger study to investigate the effect of sequential administration of NSAIDs for longer durations and in dogs with signs of acute and chronic pain is essential to substantiate these findings.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine serum pharmacokinetics of pentoxifylline and its 5-hydroxyhexyl metabolite in horses after administration of a single IV dose and after single and multiple oral doses.

Animals—8 healthy adult horses.

Procedures—A crossover study design was used with a washout period of 6 days between treatments. Treatments were IV administration of a single dose of pentoxifylline (8.5 mg/kg) and oral administration of generic sustained-release pentoxifylline (10 mg/kg, q 12 h, for 8 days). Blood samples were collected 0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 20, 30, and 45 minutes and 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 hours after IV administration. For oral administration, blood samples were collected 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 hours after the first dose and 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours after the last dose.

Results—Elimination of pentoxifylline was rapid after IV administration. After oral administration, pentoxifylline was rapidly absorbed and variably eliminated. Higher serum concentrations of pentoxifylline and apparent bioavailability were observed after oral administration of the first dose, compared with values after administration of the last dose on day 8 of treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In horses, oral administration of 10 mg of pentoxifylline/kg results in serum concentrations equivalent to those observed for therapeutic doses of pentoxifylline in humans. Twice daily administration appears to be appropriate. However, serum concentrations of pentoxifylline appear to decrease with repeated dosing; thus, practitioners may consider increasing the dosage if clinical response diminishes with repeated administration.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the disposition of a bolus of meloxicam (administered IV) in horses and donkeys (Equus asinus) and compare the relative pharmacokinetic variables between the species.

Animals—5 clinically normal horses and 5 clinically normal donkeys.

Procedures—Blood samples were collected before and after IV administration of a bolus of meloxicam (0.6 mg/kg). Serum meloxicam concentrations were determined in triplicate via high-performance liquid chromatography. The serum concentration-time curve for each horse and donkey was analyzed separately to estimate standard noncompartmental pharmacokinetic variables.

Results—In horses and donkeys, mean ± SD area under the curve was 18.8 ± 7.31 μg/mL/h and 4.6 ± 2.55 μg/mL/h, respectively; mean residence time (MRT) was 9.6 ± 9.24 hours and 0.6 ± 0.36 hours, respectively. Total body clearance (CLT) was 34.7 ± 9.21 mL/kg/h in horses and 187.9 ± 147.26 mL/kg/h in donkeys. Volume of distribution at steady state (VDSS) was 270 ± 160.5 mL/kg in horses and 93.2 ± 33.74 mL/kg in donkeys. All values, except VDSS, were significantly different between donkeys and horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The small VDSS of meloxicam in horses and donkeys (attributed to high protein binding) was similar to values determined for other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Compared with other species, horses had a much shorter MRT and greater CLT for meloxicam, indicating a rapid elimination of the drug from plasma; the even shorter MRT and greater CLT of meloxicam in donkeys, compared with horses, may make the use of the drug in this species impractical.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To study the pharmacokinetics of difloxacin (5 mg/kg) following IV, IM, and intragastric (IG) administration to healthy horses.

Animals—6 healthy mature horses.

Procedures—A crossover study design with 3 phases was used (15-day washout periods between treatments). An injectable formulation of difloxacin (5%) was administered IV and IM in single doses (5 mg/kg); for IG administration, an oral solution was prepared and administered via nasogastric tube. Blood samples were collected before and at intervals after each administration. A high-performance liquid chromatography assay with fluorescence detection was used to determine plasma difloxacin concentrations. Pharmacokinetic parameters of difloxacin were analyzed. Plasma creatine kinase activity was monitored to assess tissue damage.

Results—Difloxacin plasma concentration versus time data after IV administration were best described by a 2-compartment open model. The disposition of difloxacin following IM or IG administration was best described by a 1-compartment model. Mean half-life for difloxacin administered IV, IM, and IG was 2.66, 5.72, and 10.75 hours, respectively. Clearance after IV administration was 0.28 L/kg•h. After IM administration, the absolute mean ± SD bioavailability was 95.81 ± 3.11% and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) was 1.48 ± 0.12 mg/L. After IG administration, the absolute bioavailability was 68.62 ± 10.60% and Cmax was 0.732 ± 0.05 mg/L. At 12 hours after IM administration, plasma creatine kinase activity had increased 7-fold, compared with the preinjection value.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Data suggest that difloxacin is likely to be effective for treating susceptible bacterial infections in horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetic disposition of IV administered caffeine in healthy Lama spp camelids.

Animals—4 adult male alpacas and 4 adult female llamas.

Procedures—Caffeine (3 mg/kg) was administered as an IV bolus. Plasma caffeine concentrations were determined by use of high-performance liquid chromatography in 6 animals and by use of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in 2 llamas.

Results—Median elimination half-life was 11 hours (range, 9.3 to 29.8 hours) in alpacas and 16 hours (range, 5.4 to 17 hours) in llamas. The volume of distribution at steady state was 0.60 L/kg (range, 0.45 to 0.93 L/kg) in alpacas and 0.75 L/kg (range, 0.68 to 1.15 L/kg) in llamas. Total plasma clearance was 44 mL/h/kg (range, 24 to 56 mL/h/kg) in alpacas and 42 mL/h/kg (range, 30 to 109 mL/h/kg) in llamas.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were suitable methods for determination of plasma caffeine concentrations in alpacas and llamas. Plasma caffeine concentration-time curves were best described by a 2-compartment model. Elimination half-lives, plasma clearance, volume of distribution at steady state, and mean residence time were not significantly different between alpacas and llamas. Intravenous administration of caffeine at a dose of 3 mg/kg did not induce clinical signs of excitement.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To characterize pharmacokinetics of voriconazole in horses after oral and IV administration and determine the in vitro physicochemical characteristics of the drug that may affect oral absorption and tissue distribution.

Animals—6 adult horses.

Procedures—Horses were administered voriconazole (1 mg/kg, IV, or 4 mg/kg, PO), and plasma concentrations were measured by use of high-performance liquid chromatography. In vitro plasma protein binding and the octanol:water partition coefficient were also assessed.

Results—Voriconazole was adequately absorbed after oral administration in horses, with a systemic bioavailability of 135.75 ± 18.41%. The elimination half-life after a single orally administered dose was 13.11 ± 2.85 hours, and the maximum plasma concentration was 2.43 ± 0.4 μg/mL. Plasma protein binding was 31.68%, and the octanol:water partition coefficient was 64.69. No adverse reactions were detected during the study.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Voriconazole has excellent absorption after oral administration and a long half-life in horses. On the basis of the results of this study, it was concluded that administration of voriconazole at a dosage of 4 mg/kg, PO, every 24 hours will attain plasma concentrations adequate for treatment of horses with fungal infections for which the fungi have a minimum inhibitory concentration ≤ 1 μg/mL. Because of the possible nonlinearity of this drug as well as the potential for accumulation, chronic dosing studies and clinical trials are needed to determine the appropriate dosing regimen for voriconazole in horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives—To measure serum polymyxin B concentration after single and repeated IV infusions in horses.

Animals—5 healthy horses.

Procedures—In study 1, 1 mg (6,000 U) of polymyxin B/kg was given IV and blood samples were collected for 24 hours. In study 2, 1 mg of polymyxin B/kg was given IV every 8 hours for 5 treatments and blood samples were collected until 24 hours after the last dose. Polymyxin B concentration was measured as the ability to suppress nitrite production by murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-α. Urine was collected prior to the first drug infusion and 24 hours after the fifth drug infusion for determination of urinary γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT)to-creatinine ratios.

Results—In study 1, mean ± SEM maximal serum polymyxin B concentration was 2.93 ± 0.38 μg/mL. Polymyxin B was undetectable 18 hours after infusion. In study 2, maximal polymyxin B concentrations after the first and fifth doses were 2.98 ± 0.81 μg/mL and 1.91 ± 0.50 μg/mL, respectively. Mean trough concentration for all doses was 0.22 ± 0.01 μg/mL. A significant effect of repeated administration on peak and trough serum concentration was not detected. Urine GGT-to-creatinine ratios were not affected by polymyxin B administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Polymyxin B given as multiple infusions to healthy horses by use of this protocol did not accumulate in the vascular compartment and appeared safe. Results support repeated IV use of 1 mg of polymyxin B/kg at 8-hour intervals as treatment for endotoxemia.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To measure effects of Escherichia coli O149:F4–induced diarrhea on water consumption and pharmacokinetics of amoxicillin after administration in drinking water.

Animals—24 recently weaned 24- to 28-day-old crossbred pigs.

Procedure—10 pigs were inoculated with E coli O149:F4; all 10 pigs subsequently developed diarrhea. Pigs were medicated by administration of amoxicillin in the drinking water (0.75 mg/mL) for a 4-hour period on 2 consecutive days. Fourteen age-matched noninfected healthy pigs (control group) were medicated in a similar manner. Blood samples were obtained from both groups daily, and plasma concentrations of amoxicillin were analyzed by use of high-performance liquid chromatography.

Results—Diarrhea reduced the area under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of amoxicillin on the first day of medication by 56% and 63%, respectively. The AUC of amoxicillin on the second day of medication for diarrheic pigs did not differ significantly from that of control pigs on the first day of medication.

Conclusions and Clinical RelevanceE coli–induced diarrhea reduced the AUC of amoxicillin and time that plasma concentration of amoxicillin was > 0.025 μg/mL and, hence, less likely to have a therapeutic effect on the first day of administration in drinking water. On the assumption that plasma concentrations may indirectly reflect concentrations at the site of infection, analysis of our results suggests that higher doses of amoxicillin may be appropriate for administration in drinking water during a 4-hour period on the first day that pigs have diarrhea attributable to E coli O149:F4.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research