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Abstract

Objective—To characterize the plasma pharmacokinetics and clinical effects of pirfenidone administered IV in healthy horses.

Animals—6 adult horses.

Procedures—A 15 mg/kg dose of pirfenidone was administered IV over 5 minutes. Physical variables were recorded and blood samples collected prior to infusion; 2.5 minutes after beginning infusion; at the end of infusion; and at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 75, and 90 minutes and 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hours after completion of infusion. Plasma concentrations of pirfenidone and its metabolites were determined.

Results—Mild clinical effects, including tachycardia and muscle fasciculations, were observed during drug administration but stopped at the end of the infusion. Pirfenidone and 2 metabolites, hydroxypirfenidone and carboxypirfenidone, were detected by the end of the 5-minute infusion. Mean peak plasma concentration of pirfenidone was 182.5 μmol/L, detected at the end of the infusion. Mean peak plasma concentrations of hydroxypirfenidone and carboxypirfenidone were 1.07 and 3.4 μmol/L, respectively, at 40 minutes after infusion. No parent drug or metabolites were detected at 24 hours. Distribution of pirfenidone best fit a 2-compartment model, and the drug had mean ± SEM elimination half-life of 86.0 ± 4.7 minutes, mean body clearance of 6.54 ± 0.45 mL/kg/min, and apparent volume of distribution at steady state of 0.791 ± 0.056 L/kg.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Intravenous administration of pirfenidone was tolerated with transient adverse affects during infusion, and drug clearance was rapid.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of morphine and the effects of ketoconazole on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of morphine in healthy Greyhounds.

Animals—6 healthy Greyhounds, 3 male and 3 female.

Procedures—Morphine sulfate (0.5 mg/kg. IV) was administered to Greyhounds prior to and after 5 days of ketoconazole (12.7 ± 0.6 mg/kg, PO) treatment. Plasma samples were obtained from blood samples that were collected at predetermined time points for measurement of morphine and ketoconazole concentrations by mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetics of morphine were estimated by use of computer software.

Results—Pharmacodynamic effects of morphine in Greyhounds were similar to those of other studies in dogs and were similar between treatment groups. Morphine was rapidly eliminated with a half-life of 1.28 hours and a plasma clearance of 32.55 mL/min/kg. The volume of distribution was 3.6 L/kg. No significant differences in the pharmacokinetics of morphine were found after treatment with ketoconazole. Plasma concentrations of ketoconazole were high and persisted longer than expected in Greyhounds.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ketoconazole had no significant effect on morphine pharmacokinetics, and the pharmacodynamics were similar between treatment groups. Plasma concentrations of ketoconazole were higher than expected and persisted longer than expected in Greyhounds.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the pharmacokinetics and behavioral effects of aminorex administered IV and PO in horses.

Animals—7 Thoroughbreds.

Procedures—In a cross-over design, aminorex (0.03 mg/kg) was administered IV or PO. Plasma and urinary aminorex concentrations were determined via liquid chromatography– mass spectrometry.

Results—Decrease of aminorex from plasma following IV administration was described by a 3-compartment pharmacokinetic model. Median (range) values of α, β, and γ half-lives were 0.04 (0.01 to 0.28), 2.30 (1.23 to 3.09), and 18.82 (8.13 to 46.64) hours, respectively. Total body and renal clearance, the area under the plasma time curve, and initial volume of distribution were 37.26 (28.61 to 56.24) mL·min/kg, 1.25 (0.85 to 2.05) mL·min/kg, 13.39 (8.82 to 17.37) ng·h/mL, and 1.44 (0.10 to 3.64) L/kg, respectively. Oral administration was described by a 2-compartment model with first-order absorption, elimination from the central compartment, and distribution into peripheral compartments. The absorption half-life was 0.29 (0.12 to 1.07) hours, whereas the β and γ elimination phases were 1.93 (1.01 to 3.17) and 23.57 (15.16 to 47.45) hours, respectively. The area under the curve for PO administration was 10.38 (4.85 to 13.40) ng·h/mL and the fractional absorption was 81.8% (33.8% to 86.9%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Aminorex administered IV had a large volume of distribution, initial rapid decrease, and an extended terminal elimination. Following PO administration, there was rapid absorption, rapid initial decrease, and an extended terminal elimination. At a dose of 0.03 mg/kg, the only effects detected were transient and central in origin and were observed only following IV administration.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To develop a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay for cetirizine in feline plasma and determine the pharmacokinetics of cetirizine in healthy cats after oral administration of a single dose (5 mg) of cetirizine dihydrochloride.

Animals—9 healthy cats.

Procedures—Heparinized blood samples were collected prior to and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 24 hours after oral administration of 5 mg of cetirizine dihydrochloride to each cat (dosage range, 0.6 to 1.4 mg/kg). Plasma was harvested and analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC. Plasma concentrations of cetirizine were analyzed with a compartmental pharmacokinetic model. Protein binding was measured by ultrafiltration with a microcentrifugation system.

Results—No adverse effects were detected after drug administration in the cats. Mean ± SD terminal half-life was 10.06 ± 4.05 hours, and mean peak plasma concentration was 3.30 ± 1.55 μg/mL. Mean volume of distribution and clearance (per fraction absorbed) were 0.24 ± 0.09 L/kg and 0.30 ± 0.09 mL/kg/min, respectively. Mean plasma concentrations were approximately 2.0 μg/mL or higher for 10 hours and were maintained at > 0.72 μg/mL for 24 hours. Protein binding was approximately 88%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A single dose of cetirizine dihydrochloride (approx 1 mg/kg, which corresponded to approximately 0.87 mg of cetirizine base/kg) was administered orally to cats. It was tolerated well and maintained plasma concentrations higher than those considered effective in humans for 24 hours after dosing. The half-life of cetirizine in cats is compatible with once-daily dosing, and the extent of protein binding is high.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To characterize the pharmacokinetics of remifentanil in conscious cats and cats anesthetized with isoflurane.

Animals—6 cats.

Procedures—Remifentanil (1 μg/kg/min for 5 minutes) was administered IV in conscious cats or cats anesthetized with 1.63% isoflurane in oxygen in a randomized crossover design. Blood samples were obtained immediately prior to remifentanil administration and every minute for 10 minutes, every 2 minutes for 10 minutes, and every 5 minutes for 10 minutes after the beginning of the infusion. Blood was immediately transferred to tubes containing citric acid, flash frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at −80°C until analysis. Blood remifentanil concentration was determined by use of liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Remifentanil concentration-time data were fitted to compartment models.

Results—A 2-compartment model (with zero-order input because of study design) best described the disposition of remifentanil in awake and isoflurane-anesthetized cats. The apparent volume of distribution of the central compartment, the apparent volume of distribution at steady state, the clearance, and the terminal half-life (median [range]) were 1,596 (1,164 to 2,111) and 567 (278 to 641) mL/kg, 7,632 (2,284 to 76,039) and 1,651 (446 to 29,229) mL/kg, 766 (408 to 1,473) and 371 (197 to 472) mL/min/kg, and 17.4 (5.5 to 920.3) and 15.7 (3.8 to 410.3) minutes in conscious and anesthetized cats, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The disposition of remifentanil in cats was characterized by a high clearance. Isoflurane anesthesia significantly decreased the volume of the central compartment, likely by decreasing blood flow to vessel-rich organs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess bioequivalence after oral, IM, and IV administration of racemic ketoprofen in pigs and to investigate the bioavailability after oral and IM administration.

Animals—8 crossbred pigs.

Procedures—Each pig received 4 treatments in a randomized crossover design, with a 6-day washout period. Ketoprofen was administered at 3 and 6 mg/kg, PO; 3 mg/kg, IM; and 3 mg/kg, IV. Plasma ketoprofen concentrations were measured by use of high-performance liquid chromatography for up to 48 hours. To assess bioequivalence, a 90% confidence interval was calculated for the area under the time-concentration curve (AUC) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax).

Results—Equivalence was not detected in the AUCs among the various routes of administration nor in Cmax between oral and IM administration of 3 mg/kg. The bioavailability of ketoprofen was almost complete after each oral or IM administration. Mean ± SD Cmax was 5.09 ± 1.41 μg/mL and 7.62 ± 1.22 μg/mL after oral and IM doses of 3 mg/kg, respectively. Mean elimination half-life varied from 3.52 ± 0.90 hours after oral administration of 3 mg/kg to 2.66 ± 0.50 hours after IV administration. Time to peak Cmax after administration of all treatments was approximately 1 hour. Increases in AUC and Cmax were proportional when the orally administered dose was increased from 3 to 6 mg/kg.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Orally administered ketoprofen was absorbed well in pigs, although bioequivalence with IM administration of ketoprofen was not detected. Orally administered ketoprofen may have potential for use in treating pigs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate penciclovir pharmacokinetics following single and multiple oral administrations of famciclovir to cats.

Animals—8 adult cats.

Procedures—A balanced crossover design was used. Phase I consisted of a single administration (62.5 mg, PO) of famciclovir. Phase II consisted of multiple doses of famciclovir (62.5 mg, PO) given every 8 or 12 hours for 3 days. Plasma penciclovir concentrations were assayed via liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry at fixed time points after famciclovir administration.

Results—Following a single dose of famciclovir, the dose-normalized (15 mg/kg) maximum concentration (Cmax) of penciclovir (350 ± 180 ng/mL) occurred at 4.6 ± 1.8 hours and mean ± SD apparent elimination half-life was 3.1 ± 0.9 hours. However, the dose-normalized area under the plasma penciclovir concentration-time curve extrapolated to infinity (AUC0→∞) during phase I decreased with increasing dose, suggesting either nonlinear pharmacokinetics or interindividual variability among cats. Accumulation occurred following multiple doses of famciclovir administered every 8 hours as indicated by a significantly increased dose-normalized AUC, compared with AUC0→∞ from phase 1. Dose-normalized penciclovir Cmaxfollowing administration of famciclovir every 12 or 8 hours (290 ± 150 ng/mL or 780 ± 250 ng/mL, respectively) was notably less than the in vitro concentration (3,500 ng/mL) required for activity against feline herpesvirus-1.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Penciclovir pharmacokinetics following oral famciclovir administration in cats appeared complex within the dosage range studied. Famciclovir dosages of 15 mg/kg administered every 8 hours to cats are unlikely to result in plasma penciclovir concentrations with activity against feline herpesvirus-1.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole following IV and PO administration and assess the distribution of voriconazole into body fluids following repeated PO administration in horses.

Animals—6 clinically normal adult horses.

Procedures—All horses received voriconazole (10 mg/kg) IV and PO (2-week interval between treatments). Plasma voriconazole concentrations were determined prior to and at intervals following administration. Subsequently, voriconazole was administered PO (3 mg/kg) twice daily for 10 days to all horses; plasma, synovial fluid, CSF, urine, and preocular tear film concentrations of voriconazole were then assessed.

Results—Mean ± SD volume of distribution at steady state was 1,604.9 ± 406.4 mL/kg. Systemic bioavailability of voriconazole following PO administration was 95 ± 19%; the highest plasma concentration of 6.1 ± 1.4 μg/mL was attained at 0.6 to 2.3 hours. Mean peak plasma concentration was 2.57 μg/mL, and mean trough plasma concentration was 1.32 μg/mL. Mean plasma, CSF, synovial fluid, urine, and preocular tear film concentrations of voriconazole after long-term PO administration were 5.163 ± 1.594 μg/mL, 2.508 ± 1.616 μg/mL, 3.073 ± 2.093 μg/mL, 4.422 ± 0.8095 μg/mL, and 3.376 ± 1.297 μg/mL, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that voriconazole distributed quickly and widely in the body; following a single IV dose, initial plasma concentrations were high with a steady and early decrease in plasma concentration. Absorption of voriconazole after PO administration was excellent, compared with absorption after IV administration. Voriconazole appears to be another option for the treatment of fungal infections in horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ϵ-aminocaproic acid (EACA), including the effects of EACA on coagulation and fibrinolysis in healthy horses.

Animals—6 adult horses.

Procedures—Each horse received 3.5 mg of EACA/kg/min for 20 minutes, IV. Plasma EACA concentration was measured before (time 0), during, and after infusion. Coagulation variables and plasma α2-antiplasmin activity were evaluated at time 0 and 4 hours after infusion; viscoelastic properties of clot formation were assessed at time 0 and 0.5, 1, and 4 hours after infusion. Plasma concentration versus time data were evaluated by use of a pharmacokinetic analysis computer program.

Results—Drug disposition was best described by a 2-compartment model with a rapid distribution phase, an elimination half-life of 2.3 hours, and mean residence time of 2.5 ± 0.5 hours. Peak plasma EACA concentration was 462.9 ± 70.1 μg/mL; after the end of the infusion, EACA concentration remained greater than the proposed therapeutic concentration (130 μg/mL) for 1 hour. Compared with findings at 0 minutes, EACA administration resulted in no significant change in plasma α2-antiplasmin activity at 1 or 4 hours after infusion. Thirty minutes after infusion, platelet function was significantly different from that at time 0 and 1 and 4 hours after infusion. The continuous rate infusion that would maintain proposed therapeutic plasma concentrations of EACA was predicted (ie, 3.5 mg/kg/min for 15 minutes, then 0.25 mg/kg/min).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that EACA has potential clinical use in horses for which improved clot maintenance is desired.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the effects of oral administration of activated charcoal (AC) and urine alkalinization via oral administration of sodium bicarbonate on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered carprofen in dogs.

Animals—6 neutered male Beagles.

Procedures—Each dog underwent 3 experiments (6-week interval between experiments). The dogs received a single dose of carprofen (16 mg/kg) orally at the beginning of each experiment; after 30 minutes, sodium bicarbonate (40 mg/kg, PO), AC solution (2.5 g/kg, PO), or no other treatments were administered. Plasma concentrations of unchanged carprofen were determined via high-performance liquid chromatography at intervals until 48 hours after carprofen administration. Data were analyzed by use of a Student paired t test or Wilcoxon matched-pairs rank test.

Results—Compared with the control treatment, administration of AC decreased plasma carprofen concentrations (mean ± SD maximum concentration was 85.9 ± 11.9 mg/L and 58.1 ± 17.6 mg/L, and area under the time-concentration curve was 960 ± 233 mg/L•h and 373 ± 133 mg/L•h after control and AC treatment, respectively). The elimination half-life remained constant. Administration of sodium bicarbonate had no effect on plasma drug concentrations.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—After oral administration of carprofen in dogs, administration of AC effectively decreased maximum plasma carprofen concentration, compared with the control treatment, probably by decreasing carprofen absorption. Results suggest that AC can be used to reduce systemic carprofen absorption in dogs receiving an overdose of carprofen. Oral administration of 1 dose of sodium bicarbonate had no apparent impact on carprofen kinetics in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research