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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the outcome of surgical creation of multiple drainage holes (MDHs) versus local corticosteroid injection (LCI) for treatment of aural hematomas (AHs) in dogs and identify risk factors for recurrence and development of new AHs.

ANIMALS

51 dogs with 71 AHs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed, and information on signalment, clinical findings, and outcome was recorded. Recurrence was defined as development of an AH at the primary site after the first month of treatment. Development of a new AH was defined as an AH occurring at a site different from the treated site.

RESULTS

The recurrence rate after the first month of treatment was significantly higher following the LCI procedure (17/48 AHs [33%]) than after the MDH procedure (1/24 AHs [4%]). The odds of recurrence increased as the numbers of LCI in the first month increased (OR, 2.414). Recurrent AHs after LCI resolved with additional LCIs; only 1 AH (2%) required a change to MDHs. No recurrence was observed after the eighth month, and the cosmetic results were good. Sixteen of 51 (31%) dogs had multiple or new AHs. The risk of new AHs was higher in Golden Retrievers and Labrador Retrievers and in dogs with allergic dermatitis.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Long-term outcomes suggested that both creation of MDHs and LCI can be therapeutic options for dogs with AHs. However, the risk of new AH development should be considered, especially in retriever breeds and dogs with allergic dermatitis.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate ultrasound-guided placement of an anchor wire (AW) or injection of methylene blue (MB) to aid in the intraoperative localization of peripheral lymph nodes in dogs and cats.

ANIMALS

125 dogs and 10 cats with a total of 171 lymphadenectomies.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of dogs and cats that underwent peripheral lymphadenectomies with or without (N) the AW or MB localization technique were reviewed. Data retrieved included clinical, surgical, and histologic findings. The proportions of successful lymphadenectomies, lymph node characteristics, and complications among the 3 groups were analyzed.

RESULTS

143 (84%) lymph nodes were successfully excised. Lymphadenectomy success was significantly affected by the localization technique, with 94% for group AW, 87% for group MB, and 72% for group N. Lymph node size was smaller in groups AW and MB, compared with group N. Duration of lymphadenectomy was shorter in group AW, compared with groups MB and N, and in group MB, compared with group N. Intra- (7%) and postoperative (10%) complications and final diagnosis did not significantly differ among groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Both lymph node localization techniques were highly successful and reduced surgery time, compared with unassisted lymphadenectomy. Specifically, these techniques were effective for localization of normal-sized and nonpalpable lymph nodes and were efficient and practical options for peripheral lymphadenectomies, particularly for those that were small or nonpalpable.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Five years since the Food and Drug Administration required beekeepers to have a veterinary order for antimicrobials, opportunities for veterinarians to learn about honeybee health have increased, while some beekeepers are starting to see value in veterinary involvement.

Federal animal health authorities are working with a private veterinary services company to analyze the impact of antimicrobial administration on antimicrobial resistance in pigs at client farms.

The organizing committee of the proposed American College of Veterinary Medical Education has petitioned the AVMA American Board of Veterinary Specialties for recognition as a veterinary specialty organization.

Even after the pandemic recedes, SARS-CoV-2 will likely remain active in the environment in animal hosts, notably in white-tailed deer found throughout the country, according to a recent study.

Contagious equine metritis is the subject of new guidelines from the American Association of Equine Practitioners and of proposed changes to import regulations for horses from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.