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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether oral administration of metoclopramide or a commercially available powdered whole grapefruit (PWG) nutraceutical in combination with cyclosporine enhances systemic availability of cyclosporine in dogs.

Sample—8 healthy mixed-breed dogs in part 1 and 6 of these 8 dogs in part 2.

Procedures—Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics were determined over the course of 24 hours after oral administration of cyclosporine (5 mg/kg) alone, cyclosporine with metoclopramide (0.3 to 0.5 mg/kg), cyclosporine with 2 g of PWG, or cyclosporine combined with both metoclopramide and 2 g of PWG by use of a Latin square crossover study with a 14-day washout period between treatments. Sixty days later, 6 of the 8 dogs were given 10 g of PWG followed by cyclosporine, and pharmacokinetic parameters were compared with those previously obtained after administration of cyclosporine alone.

Results—Although metoclopramide or coadministration of metoclopramide and 2 g of PWG had no effect on the pharmacokinetic parameters of cyclosporine, compared with results for cyclosporine alone, the higher (10-g) dose of PWG resulted in 29% faster mean time to maximal plasma cyclosporine concentration, 54% larger area under the curve, and 38% lower apparent oral clearance.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Adjustment of the cyclosporine dose may not be needed when metoclopramide is coadministered orally to prevent common adverse effects of cyclosporine. Powdered whole grapefruit has the potential to reduce the required orally administered dose of cyclosporine but only when PWG is used in an amount (at least 10 g) that is currently not cost-effective.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To develop a simple extractionless method for detection of rosiglitazone in canine plasma and test the method in a pharmacokinetic study after oral administration of rosiglitazone in dogs.

Animals—3 client-owned dogs with cancer.

Procedures—High-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was performed on canine plasma. The 3 dogs with cancer in the pharmacokinetic study were assessed via physical examination and clinicopathologic evaluation and considered otherwise healthy. Food was withheld for 12 hours, and dogs were administered a single dose (4 mg/m2) of rosiglitazone. Plasma was collected at various times, processed, and analyzed for rosiglitazone.

Results—The developed method was robust and detected a minimum of 0.3 ng of rosiglitazone/mL. Mean ± SD maximum plasma concentration was 205.2 ± 79.1 ng/mL, which occurred at 3 ± 1 hours, and mean ± SD elimination half-life was 1.4 ± 0.4 hours. The area under the plasma rosiglitazone concentration-versus-time curve varied widely among the 3 dogs (mean ± SD, 652.2 ± 351.3 ng/h/mL).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A simple extractionless method for detection of rosiglitazone in canine plasma was developed and was validated with excellent sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and recovery. The method enabled unambiguous evaluation and quantitation of rosiglitazone in canine plasma. This method will be useful for pharmacokinetic, bioavailability, or drug-drug interaction studies. Oral rosiglitazone administration was well tolerated in the dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics of tramadol, the active metabolite O-desmethyltrcamadol, and the metabolites N-desmethyltramadol and N,O-didesmethyltramadol after oral tramadol administration and to determine the antinociceptive effects of the drug in Greyhounds.

Animals—6 healthy 2- to 3-year-old Greyhounds (3 male and 3 female), weighing 25.5 to 41.1 kg.

Procedures—A mean dose of 9.9 mg of tramadol HCl/kg was administered PO as whole tablets. Blood samples were obtained prior to and at various points after administration to measure plasma concentrations of tramadol and its metabolites via liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Antinociceptive effects were determined by measurement of pain-pressure thresholds with a von Frey device.

Results—Tramadol was well tolerated, and a significant increase in pain-pressure thresholds was evident 5 and 6 hours after administration. The mean maximum plasma concentrations of tramadol, O-desmethyltramadol, N-desmethyltramadol, and N,O-didesmethyltramadol were 215.7, 5.7, 379.1, and 2372 ng/mL, respectively. The mean area-under-the-curve values for the compounds were 592, 16, 1,536, and 1,013 h·ng/mL, respectively. The terminal half-lives of the compounds were 1.1, 1.4, 2.3, and 3.6 hours, respectively. Tramadol was detected in urine 5 days, but not 7 days, after administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Oral tramadol administration yielded antinociceptive effects in Greyhounds, but plasma concentrations of tramadol and O-desmethyltramadol were lower than expected. Compared with the approved dose (100 mg, PO) in humans, a mean dose of 9.9 mg/kg, PO resulted in similar tramadol but lower O-desmethyltramadol plasma concentrations in Greyhounds.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of cefquinome administered IV, IM, or PO to healthy ducks.

Animals—Thirty-six 2-month-old Muscovy ducks.

Procedures—Ducks were randomly assigned to 3 groups of 12 birds each for a single IV, IM, or PO administration at a dose of 5 mg/kg. Blood samples were collected before and at various intervals after each administration. Cefquinome concentration was determined by use of high-performance liquid chromatography at 268 nm with a UV detector, and pharmacokinetics were analyzed.

Results—The disposition of cefquinome following IV or IM administration was best described by a 2-compartment model. After IV administration, mean ± SD elimination halflife was 1.57 ± 0.06 hours, clearance value was 0.22 ± 0.02 L/kg·h, and apparent volume of distribution at steady state was 0.41 ± 0.04 L/kg. After IM administration, elimination half-life was 1.79 ± 0.13 hours, peak concentration time was 0.38 ± 0.06 hours, peak drug concentration was 9.38 ± 1.61 μg/mL, and absolute mean ± SD bioavailability was 93.28 ± 13.89%. No cefquinome was detected in plasma after PO administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that cefquinome was absorbed quickly and had excellent bioavailability after IM administration, but absorption after PO administration was poor.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of protein binding on the pharmacokinetics and distribution from plasma to interstitial fluid (ISF) of cephalexin and cefpodoxime proxetil in dogs.

Animals—6 healthy dogs.

Procedures—In a crossover study design, 25 mg of cephalexin/kg or 9.6 mg of cefpodoxime/kg was administered orally. Blood samples were collected before (time 0) and 0.33, 0.66, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, and 24 hours after treatment. An ultrafiltration device was used in vivo to collect ISF at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, and 24 hours. Plasma and ISF concentrations were analyzed with high-pressure liquid chromatography. Plasma protein binding was measured by use of a microcentrifugation technique.

Results—Mean plasma protein binding for cefpodoxime and cephalexin was 82.6% and 20.8%, respectively. Mean ± SD values for cephalexin in plasma were determined for peak plasma concentration (Cmax, 31.5 ± 11.5 μg/mL), area under the time-concentration curve (AUC, 155.6 ± 29.5 μg•h/mL), and terminal half-life (T½, 4.7 ± 1.2 hours); corresponding values in ISF were 16.3 ± 5.8 μg/mL, 878 ± 21.0 μg•h/mL, and 3.2 ± 0.6 hours, respectively. Mean ± SD values for cefpodoxime in plasma were 33.0 ± 6.9 μg/mL (Cmax), 282.8 ± 44.0 μg•h/mL (AUC), and 5.7 ± 0.9 hours (T1/2); corresponding values in ISF were 4.3 ± 2.0 μg/mL, 575 ± 174 μg•h/mL, and 10.4 ± 3.3 hours, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tissue concentration of protein-unbound cefpodoxime was similar to that of the protein-unbound plasma concentration. Cefpodoxime remained in tissues longer than did cephalexin.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics of gallium maltolate (GaM) after intragastric administration in adult horses.

Animals—6 adult horses.

Procedures—Feed was withheld for 12 hours prior to intragastric administration of GaM (20 mg/kg). A single dose of GaM was administered to each horse via a nasogastric tube (time 0). Blood samples were collected at various time points from 0 to 120 hours. Serum was used to determine gallium concentrations by use of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. Noncompartmental and compartmental analyses of serum gallium concentrations were performed. Pharmacokinetic models were selected on the basis of the Akaike information criterion and visual analysis of plots of residuals.

Results—Serum concentration data for 1 horse were such that this horse was considered an outlier and excluded from noncompartmental and compartmental analyses. Noncompartmental analysis was used to determine individual pharmacokinetic parameters. A 1-compartment model with first-order input and output and lag time was selected as the best-fit model for the data and used to determine mean — SD values for maximum observed serum concentration (0.28 — 0.09 μg/mL), time of maximum concentration (3.09 — 0.43 hours), time to the first measurable concentration (0.26 — 0.11 hours), apparent elimination half-life (48.82 — 5.63 hours), area under the time-concentration curve (20.68 — 757 h—μg/mL), and apparent volume of distribution (73,493 — 18,899 mL/kg).

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Further studies are necessary to determine the bioavailability of GaM after intragastric administration in adult horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics of DL-α-lipoic acid in dogs when administered at 3 dosages via 3 methods of delivery.

Animals—27 clinically normal Beagles.

Procedures—In a 3 × 3 factorial Latin square design, 3 dosages (2.5, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg) of DL-α-lipoic acid were administered orally in a capsule form and provided without a meal, in a capsule form and provided with a meal, and as an ingredient included in an extruded dog food. Food was withheld for 12 hours prior to DL-α-lipoic acid administration. Blood samples were collected before (0 minutes) and at 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 minutes after administration. Plasma concentrations of DL-α-lipoic acid were determined via high-performance liquid chromatography. A generalized linear models procedure was used to evaluate the effects of method of delivery and dosage. Noncompartmental analysis was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters of DL-α-lipoic acid. Nonparametric tests were used to detect significant differences between pharmacokinetic parameters among treatment groups.

Results—A significant effect of dosage was observed regardless of delivery method. Method of delivery also significantly affected plasma concentrations of DL-α-lipoic acid, with extruded foods resulting in lowest concentration for each dosage administered. Maximum plasma concentration was significantly affected by method of delivery at each dosage administered. Other significant changes in pharmacokinetic parameters were variable and dependent on dosage and method of delivery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Values for pharmacokinetic parameters of orally administered DL-α-lipoic acid may differ significantly when there are changes in dosage, method of administration, and fed status.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine pharmacokinetics and plasma steady-state kinetics of metformin after oral or nasogastric administration in insulin-resistant (IR) ponies

Animals—8 IR ponies

Procedures—Metformin (30 mg/kg) was administered to 8 ponies via nasogastric tube Blood samples were collected at intervals for 24 hours. Plasma concentrations of metformin were measured via liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectroscopy Pharmacokinetic variables were determined via noncompartmental analysis. Metformin (15 mg/kg, PO, twice daily [8 am and 5 pm]) was administered to 4 ponies for an additional 20 days, and blood samples were obtained every 2 days. Plasma concentration at steady state (Css) was determined.

Results—Mean ± SD elimination half-life (t1/2) of metformin was 11.7 ± 5.2 hours, maxima plasma concentration was 748 ± 269 ng/mL at 54 ± 32 minutes, mean area under the curve was 355 ± 92μg•h/mL, and apparent clearance was 90.6 ± 28.1 mL/min/kg. The Css was 122 ± 22 ng/mL.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Metformin reportedly enhances insulin sensitivity of peripheral tissues without stimulating insulin secretion, but bioavailability in horses is low. The t1/2 of metformin in IR ponies was similar to that in humans. Actual clearance of metformin adjusted for bioavailability in IR ponies was similar to that in humans; however, during chronic oral administration at dosages reported in efficacy studies, the Css of metformin was less than values associated with therapeutic efficacy in humans The apparent lack of long-term efficacy of metformin in horses is likely attributable to low bioavailability, rather than to rapid clearance. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1201-1206)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of minocycline in horses.

Animals—5 healthy Thoroughbred mares for the pharmacokinetic experiment and 6 healthy Thoroughbred mares for the tissue distribution experiment.

Procedures—Each mare was given 2.2 mg of minocycline hydrochloride/kg, IV. Blood samples were collected once before minocycline administration (0 hours) and 10 times within 48 hours after administration in the pharmacokinetics study, and 24 tissue samples were obtained at 0.5 and 3 hours in the distribution study.

Results—No adverse effects were observed in any of the mares after minocycline administration. The mean ± SD elimination half-life was 7.70 ± 1.91 hours. The total body clearance was 0.16 ± 0.04 L/h/kg, and the volume of distribution at steady state was 1.53 ± 0.09 L/kg. The percentage of plasma protein binding was 68.1 ± 2.6%. Plasma concentration of free minocycline was 0.12 μg/mL at 12 hours. Minocycline was not detected in brain tissue, CSF or aqueous humor at 0.5 hours; however, it was found in all tissues, except in the aqueous humor, at 3 hours.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Clearance of minocycline in healthy mares was greater than that reported for humans. For effective treatment of infections with common equine pathogens, it will be necessary to administer minocycline at a dosage of 2.2 mg/kg, IV, every 12 hours. This drug could be useful for infections in many tissues, including the CNS. The pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution data should aid in the appropriate use of minocycline in horses. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1062–1066)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of clopidogrel and the metabolite SR 26334 in dogs.

Animals—9 mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—8 dogs received clopidogrel (mean ± SD 1.13 ± 0.17 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) for 3 days; 5 of these dogs subsequently received a lower dose of clopidogrel (0.5 ± 0.18 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) for 3 days. Later, 5 dogs received clopidogrel (1.09 ± 0.12 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) for 5 days. Blood samples were collected for optical platelet aggregometry, citrated native and platelet mapping thrombelastography (TEG), and measurement of plasma drug concentrations. Impedance aggregometry was performed on samples from 3 dogs in each 3-day treatment group.

Results—ADP-induced platelet aggregation decreased (mean ± SD 93 ± 6% and 80 ± 22% of baseline values, respectively) after 72 hours in dogs in both 3-day treatment groups; duration of effect ranged from > 3 to > 7 days. Platelet mapping TEG and impedance aggregometry yielded similar results. Citrated native TEG was not different among groups. Clopidogrel was not detected in any samples; in dogs given 1.13 ± 0.17 mg/kg, maximum concentration of SR 26334 (mean ± SD, 0.206 ± 0.2 μg/mL) was detected 1 hour after administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Clopidogrel inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation in healthy dogs and may be a viable antiplatelet agent for use in dogs.

Impact for Human Medicine—Pharmacodynamic effects of clopidogrel in dogs were similar to effects reported in humans; clopidogrel may be useful in studies involving dogs used to investigate human disease.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research