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Author: Eric Davis
Addressing the safety of postanesthesia euthanasia for scavengers

The article “Use of potassium chloride for low-residue euthanasia of anesthetized California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) with life-threatening injury or disease” by Witmer et al 1 addresses an important aspect of euthanasia. In the case of wild species, or animals that must be humanely euthanized in areas where rendering facilities do not exist, options other than barbiturates need to be available. This paper clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of potassium chloride as one of these choices. An additional important issue is the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
A different perspective on resiliency

I read with interest the article in the May 1, 2021, issue about the AAVMC sessions highlighting student “anxiety” and the “over-valuing of resiliency.” 1 Sixty-three years have passed since my interview and acceptance into the class of ‘62 at the University of Pennsylvania veterinary school. I was fortunate to gain my VMD degree, and there was no lack of anxiety during those 4 years. However, a background that included a fair amount of adversity as well as resiliency, plus working on a dairy farm for 10 years, prepared me for whatever came along.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
More articles about zoonoses

Thank you for publishing the JAVMA News story “Bartonellosis: a zoonosis hidden in plain sight.” 1 Importantly, the article notes that encephalopathy, inflammatory syndromes, and irritability are all potential manifestations of barton-ellosis in humans.

Over the past 20 years, I've read countless articles about burnout, compassion fatigue, and suicide in the veterinary profession, but few discuss the possible role of certain zoonoses in these issues. Microbes and mental health are linked. Changes in behavior, cognition, executive functioning, and emotional states can be caused by infections and the body's response to those infections, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Understanding resilience

I was surprised and puzzled by the headline for a recent JAVMA News story, 1 which highlighted that resilience was overvalued. The story reported on the presentation “The high cost of resilience: a discussion of the overarching impacts of veterinary student stress” given by Jeremiah Grissett, a counselor and wellness coordinator at Oklahoma State University College of Veterinary Medicine, at this year's annual conference of the American Association of Veterinary Medical Colleges. According to the article, Grissett stated “There is a huge reliance on overvaluing resiliency, hardiness, and grit” and suggested that overvaluing resilience invalidates

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Author: Lisa A. Fortier
Introduction

When I began my veterinary journey as a student at Colorado State University more than 30 years ago, I would never have imagined that I would be introducing myself to our profession as editor-in-chief of two world-renowned veterinary journals: the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association and the American Journal of Veterinary Research. That I am doing so is a tribute to many people—my wonderful children and partner, my parents, other family members, and my mentors, colleagues, and students in practice, research, and academia, among many others. To all of them, I express my

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Thrombocytopenia and tumor stage as prognostic indicators in dogs with splenic hemangiosarcoma

We read with interest the article “Retrospective evaluation of thrombocytopenia and tumor stage as prognostic indicators in dogs with splenic hemangiosarcoma.” 1 The authors retrospectively reviewed records of dogs with splenic hemangiosarcoma that underwent splenectomy and chemotherapy to identify prognostic factors and concluded that animals with perioperative thrombocytopenia had a poorer outcome.

However, with the exception of 1 dog that had platelet clumping on automated analysis, it was not apparent from the report that blood smears were evaluated by board-certified veterinary clinical pathologists or other trained personnel

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
More on the crisis in veterinary medicine

Ever since I started my career as a poultry veterinarian and professor at the University of California-Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, I have worried about the training veterinary students receive in preventative veterinary medicine and herd and flock health. 1 The level of training in population medicine, particularly poultry, for veterinary students in the United States is typically so limited that students who track in small animal medicine often do not have any real exposure to flock or poultry medicine. At the same time, expertise at the university level is being reduced

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Memories of Dr. Terry Curtin

I read with sadness of the passing of Dr. Terry Curtin. 1 I graduated from the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine in 1990 and was a member of one of the college's early classes (known as the School of Veterinary Medicine when first established, the college changed its name while I was a student). Dr. Curtin's push to have North Carolina fund the institution, his acquisition of a top-notch staff, and his decision to have the teaching hospital up and running before the first veterinary class enrolled helped quickly propel the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Questioning racism

I thought quite a while before writing a response regarding the recent JAVMA News story 1 on being an active ally for those who are racially or ethnically underrepresented in veterinary medicine. My issue is related to some of the items discussed by Dr. Allen Cannedy as examples of racist behaviors and phrases.

I certainly agree that people who state that their animals don't like Black people, intentionally mispronounce names, or use racial slurs are ignorant, racist, or both, but I believe such people are in a distinct minority in the veterinary profession. Most veterinarians

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Know your obligations before adopting

The recent analysis from the AVMA Veterinary Economics Division on changes in the number of pet adoptions 1 has prompted me to write about my own concerns related to the adoption of pets from animal shelters.

Animal shelters have embraced a number of advertising methods to encourage the adoption of dogs and cats, sometimes in connection with reducing or waiving adoption fees for a limited time. These tactics are specifically designed to tug at people's heartstrings, but they may, I fear, be inducing some individuals to make uninformed, hasty decisions.

I am not aware

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association