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History and Physical Examination Findings

A 1.7-year-old indoor domestic shorthair cat with no reported history of trauma was referred because of a missing left maxillary canine tooth. Two weeks prior to presentation, oral examination by the referring veterinarian revealed the presence of a complete set of permanent teeth, except for a persistent deciduous left maxillary canine tooth and absence of the permanent left maxillary canine tooth. Once the left maxillary deciduous canine tooth exfoliated and no permanent canine tooth erupted, the cat was referred for evaluation and diagnostic imaging.

Findings on referral physical examination were largely unremarkable, apart from reduced

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History and Physical Examination Findings

A 16-month-old 35.0-kg castrated male mixed-breed dog was referred for progressive right maxillary swelling. The dog had been adopted 12 months earlier and had a history of maxillofacial trauma and resolved distemper virus infection. The owner reported that the dog was otherwise healthy.

The general physical examination did not reveal any clinically important abnormalities. Oral examination revealed numerous visibly missing teeth, including all canine teeth. There was marked right maxillary swelling associated with the visibly absent right maxillary canine and first premolar teeth. There was relative maxillary brachygnathism, which did not result in soft tissue

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History and Physical Examination Findings

A nonambulatory 6-year-old 52-kg female spayed Mastiff was evaluated because of open fractures of the right radius and ulna and puncture wounds on the head, left ear, thorax, abdomen, and limbs after an unwitnessed attack by a presumed large wild animal was also referred for evaluation of dentoalveolar trauma. Oral examination performed with the dog awake revealed missing both maxillary canine teeth and hemorrhage from each respective alveolus, suggestive of dentoalveolar injury. Differential diagnoses for the missing canine teeth included complicated crown root fracture, intrusive tooth luxation, and tooth avulsion.

The dog received supportive treatment

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History and Physical Examination Findings

An 11-year-old 24.3-kg spayed female mixed-breed dog was evaluated for a recently developed darkly pigmented palatal growth. The client reported noticing a round black lesion adhered to the hard palate 1 month prior to examination.

Results of a general physical examination, CBC, and serum biochemical analysis were unremarkable. Intraoral examination revealed a darkly pigmented mass on the midpalate adjacent to the right maxillary second premolar tooth (Figure 1). The dog was anesthetized; CT images of the head and thorax were obtained before and after IV administration of contrast medium (iohexol solution,

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History and Physical Examination Findings

An 11-year-old 40-kg (88-lb) spayed female Labrador Retriever was referred to a veterinary dental specialty practice for evaluation of a suspected cyst affecting the caudal aspect of the left mandible. Two months earlier, the dog's owner had noticed a large swelling at that location. The primary care veterinarian had obtained radiographs of the affected area and collected multiple bone and soft tissue biopsy samples. Histopathologic findings included the presence of fibrosis and reactive bone as well as a squamous epithelial lining. The described swelling was diagnosed as an odontogenic cyst. Within a few weeks, the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History and Physical Examination Findings

An 18-month-old 3.5-kg (7.7-lb) spayed female Burmese cat was referred to the Dentistry and Oral Surgery Department of a veterinary referral hospital for evaluation and treatment of supernumerary teeth. The cat had been evaluated by the referring clinician 3 days earlier because of a few months’ history of severe halitosis. The cat was reportedly not showing signs of oral pain or difficulty with prehension or mastication of food. Results of a CBC and serum biochemical analysis revealed mild neutropenia (1.72 × 109 neutrophils/L; reference range, 2.30 × 109 to 10.29 ×

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History and Physical Examination Findings

A 7-month-old 2.72-kg (6-lb) sexually intact female Chihuahua was referred to a veterinary dental practice because of multiple persistent deciduous teeth and missing teeth. The referring veterinarian had noted the problem 1 month earlier during a routine presurgical examination for a scheduled ovariohysterectomy. The owner had not noticed any oral problems and stated that the dog had reached normal developmental milestones. There were no current medical concerns, and the dog was up-to-date for vaccinations and parasite prevention. The owner had not performed any oral care at home. At the referral visit, the dog was found

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History and Physical Examination Findings

An 11-year-old 28-kg (61.6-lb) spayed female mixed-breed dog was referred to Husdjurshälsan Veterinary Clinic for evaluation of an oral mass on the rostral portion of the right maxilla and signs of oral pain. The owner reported that the oral mass did not seem to cause the dog discomfort, but intermittent signs of acute oral pain had been observed as well as reluctance to chew on the left side of the mouth. A review of the dental health history revealed that the dog had no damaging chewing habits, received no dental home care, and had not

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History and Physical Examination Findings

A 3-year-old 10.9-kg (24-lb) spayed female mixed-breed dog was examined because of an oral mass in the right rostral maxillary region. The owner reported that the swelling, described as an intermittent enlargement of the muzzle, had appeared 10 days before the physical examination. Prior to this event, the dog had no apparent health problems.

The results of a general physical examination were unremarkable. Extraoral examination revealed facial asymmetry with swelling over the right rostral maxillary region and mild bilateral epiphora with no nasal discharge. Intraoral examination revealed a smooth, fluctuant mass that measured approximately 20

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History and Physical Examination Findings

A 9-year-old 14-kg (30.8-lb) spayed female mixed-breed dog was presented to a veterinary hospital for oral examination, dental radiography, and routine periodontal treatment. The dog had undergone complete annual physical and oral examinations during 2 consecutive years prior to this visit. At the initial visit, serum biochemical analysis revealed hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia (Appendix). Other examination and clinicopathologic test results were unremarkable. Cervical ultrasonography revealed a right parathyroid gland nodule. Thoracic and abdominal radiography and abdominal ultrasonography findings were unremarkable. A diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism was made; referral for parathyroidectomy was recommended but declined

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association