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Many educational loan borrowers who use income-drive repayment plans should be receiving some help this year after efforts by the Biden administration to make it easier for them to receive debt forgiveness that they may already be entitled to.

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The new guidelines on pain management in dogs and cats from the American Animal Hospital Association include discussion of proactive and multimodal strategies, according to a co-chair of the guidelines task force.

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More than 100 dog breeders have gained recognition through the Purdue University–based Canine Care Certified program.

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The allergen Fel d 1 shed by all cats is the primary cause of cat allergies in humans. Researchers used CRISPR editing to disrupt Fel d 1 genes in cells from domestic cats.

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The American Association of Veterinary Medical Colleges held its annual conference and Iverson Bell Symposium from March 3-5 in Washington, D.C. The AAVMC presented awards and seated new officials.

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The Tennessee VMA held its Music City Veterinary Conference from Feb. 18-20 in Murfreesboro. The association presented awards and seated new officials.

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Veterinarian obituaries in the “In Memory” section of the Journal of the AVMA, June 2022

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Signalment

A 1-year-old 7.0-kg castrated male Shiba Inu dog.

History

The dog was presented for tail chasing, self-injurious behavior, and fearful behavior when having a collar placed onto him or when he sensed a mobile phone vibration. He was obtained from a breeder at 12 weeks of age and lived with a couple in a single-family home. The dog’s tail-chasing behavior, without the presence of any triggers, was noticed immediately after acquisition. At first, the behavior lasted 1 minute in duration twice daily, but over 8 months, the frequency and duration increased to approximately 10 minutes in duration 5 times

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the prevalence of bronchial wall thickening (BWT) and collapse in brachycephalic dogs with and without brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS) and in nonbrachycephalic dogs.

ANIMALS

85 dogs with no history of lower respiratory tract disease that underwent CT of the thorax.

PROCEDURES

Electronical medical records for March 2011 through August 2019 were reviewed to identify brachycephalic dogs with BOAS (BOAS group) and brachycephalic dogs without BOAS (BDWB group) that did not have any evidence of lower respiratory tract disease and had undergone thoracic CT. A population of nonbrachycephalic dogs of similar weight (control dogs) was also retrospectively recruited.

RESULTS

BWT was identified in 28 of 30 (93.3%; 95% CI, 80.3% to 98.6%) dogs in the BOAS group, 15 of 26 (57.7%; 95% CI, 38.7% to 75.0%) dogs in the BDWB group, and 10 of 28 (35.7%; 95% CI, 20.1% to 54.2%) control dogs. On multivariable analysis, only brachycephalic conformation (P < 0.01) and body weight (P = 0.02) were significantly associated with the presence of BWT. Bronchial collapse was identified in 17 of 30 (56.7%; 95% CI, 39.0% to 73.1%) dogs in the BOAS group, 17 of 26 (65.4%; 95% CI, 46.3% to 81.3%) dogs in the BDWB group, and 3 of 28 (10.7%; 95% CI, 3.1% to 25.9%) control dogs. On multivariable analysis, only brachycephalic conformation was significantly (P < 0.01) associated with the presence of bronchial collapse.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

A relationship between brachycephalic conformation and body weight with BWT was established, with heavier dogs having thicker bronchial walls. However, further studies are required to investigate the cause. Bronchial collapse was also more common in dogs with brachycephalic conformation, which is in agreement with the previously published literature.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 10-year-old castrated male Maine Coon cat was presented because of a 4-day history of constipation and recent hyporexia and vomiting. Because of the cat’s temperament, the cat was sedated for physical examination. The patient had a high rectal temperature (39.9 °C; reference range, 37.8 to 39.2 °C). A gallop murmur was auscultated. The abdomen was soft, and palpation of it did not elicit signs of pain; however, the colon was thought to have been distended with a large amount of feces. No fluid wave, organomegaly, or masses were palpated. A CBC revealed a moderate, nonregenerative hyperchromatic Heinz body

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association