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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs work through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) and are highly effective for the treatment of pain and inflammation in horses. There are 2 clinically relevant isoforms of COX. Cyclooxygenase-1 is constitutively expressed and is considered important for a variety of physiologic functions, including gastrointestinal homeostasis. Thus, NSAIDs that selectively inhibit COX-2 while sparing COX-1 may be associated with a lower incidence of adverse gastrointestinal effects. Various formulations of firocoxib, a COX-2-selective NSAID, labeled for use in horses are available in the United States. Equine practitioners should know that the FDA limits the use of firocoxib to formulations labeled for horses, regardless of price concerns. In addition, practitioners will benefit from understanding the nuances of firocoxib administration, including the importance of correct dosing and the contraindications of combining NSAIDs. Together with knowledge of the potential advantages of COX-2 selectivity, these considerations will help veterinarians select and treat patients that could benefit from this new class of NSAID.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To review publications that address female reproductive health hazards in veterinary practice, summarize best practices to mitigate reproductive risks, and identify current knowledge gaps.

DESIGN Systematized review.

SAMPLE English-language articles describing chemical, biological, and physical hazards present in the veterinary workplace and associations with adverse reproductive outcomes or recommendations for minimizing risks to female reproductive health.

PROCEDURES Searches of the CAB abstracts database were performed in July 2012 and in May 2015 with the following search terms: veterinarians AND occupational hazards and vets.id AND occupational hazards.sh. Searches of the PubMed database were conducted in November 2012 and in May 2015 with the following medical subject heading terms: occupational exposure AND veterinarians; anesthetics, inhalation/adverse effects AND veterinarians; risk factors AND pregnancy AND veterinarians; pregnancy outcome AND veterinarians; and animal technicians AND occupational exposure. Two additional PubMed searches were completed in January 2016 with the terms disinfectants/toxicity AND female AND fertility/drug effects and veterinarians/psychology AND stress, psychological. No date limits were applied to searches.

RESULTS 4 sources supporting demographic trends in veterinary medicine and 118 resources reporting potential hazards to female reproductive health were identified. Reported hazards included exposure to anesthetic gases, radiation, antineoplastic drugs, and reproductive hormones; physically demanding work; prolonged standing; and zoonoses.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Demographic information suggested that an increasing number of women of reproductive age will be exposed to chemical, biological, and physical hazards in veterinary practice. Information on reproductive health hazards and minimizing risk, with emphasis on developing a safety-focused work culture for all personnel, should be discussed starting in veterinary and veterinary technical schools and integrated into employee training.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Author: Tanya D. Graham

Abstract

Since the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, concern for the future direction of biological research has expanded to include not only issues involving the welfare of mankind, but also the more immediate and personal concern of individual scientists in the life sciences community. For many investigators in the life sciences, the remainder of their careers will be impacted by concerns about bioterrorism and issues associated with dual-use research. Awareness of these issues will be critical for all professional groups and affiliated organizations as they navigate the growing call for more federal rules and regulations. Veterinarians are not immune to the coming changes in science; all researchers risk criminal sanctions if they violate the USA Patriot Act or the Bioterrorism Act of 2002. Compliance with these regulations will be necessary, not just because of the potential legal ramifications, but because establishing and maintaining public trust is a never-ending requirement for the future of scientific research.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in American Journal of Veterinary Research