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Veterinarians in memory in the March 15, 2022 Journal of the AVMA

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The Taliban’s return to power in Afghanistan plunged the country into a humanitarian crisis and quickly undid 20 years of structural progress that improved the lives of people and animals.

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At the 2022 Veterinary Meeting & Expo, Brakke Consulting discussed a chaotic, stressful year past in the animal health industry, and the Human Animal Bond Research Institute and Zoetis shared findings that 95% of dog and cat owners worldwide consider pets to be family.

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Merck Animal Health released findings from its third well-being study, which found that the percentage of veterinarians with serious psychological distress increased to 9.7% in fall 2021, compared with 6.4% in fall 2019. Regression analysis suggests that this change was an effect of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Jan. 12 that it made awards totaling $7.5 million to 78 veterinarians in 2021 toward repayment of veterinary student loans in return for service in shortage areas in food animal practice or public practice.

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Veterinarians and veterinary students say the current pause in payments and interest accrual on federal educational loans has helped them reduce their debt and feel more secure, although some expect they will need to budget carefully if payments resume in May, as currently planned.

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Small animal practitioner and Maine delegate Dr. Amanda Bisol will serve as District I director on the AVMA Board of Directors when Dr. Karen Bradley’s term ends this summer.

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Since porcine epidemic diarrhea has become endemic in the U.S., the risk on swine farms varies by farming density, region, and season, according to recent analysis.

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Whether related to work interruptions or fears of catching SARS-CoV-2, pets were a source of not only comfort but also potentially stress for many pet owners during the pandemic, according to a new study.

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