Spherocytosis as an indicator of fragmentation injury in dogs with splenic torsion

Dave Beeston Clinical Science and Services, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hertfordshire, UK

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 BVetMed, PGDip, MVetMed, DACVECC https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7230-1441
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Balazs Szladovits Department of Pathobiology and Population Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hertfordshire, UK

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 DVM, PGDip, DACVP
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Stefano Cortellini Clinical Science and Services, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hertfordshire, UK

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 DMV, MVetMed, DACVECC, DECVECC

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of 4 cases of splenic torsion with associated spherocytosis.

ANIMALS

4 client-owned dogs with spherocytosis and splenic torsion.

CLINICAL PRESENTATION

Each dog presented with nonspecific clinical signs, and 3 out of 4 dogs were anemic on presentation.

RESULTS

The diagnosis of splenic torsion was made with abdominal ultrasound or CT and confirmed during exploratory laparotomy. Spherocytosis was described as occasional (patient 1), rare (patient 2), and low number (patients 3 and 4). Two dogs survived to hospital discharge, and 2 dogs died following cardiorespiratory arrest.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Spherocytosis has not previously been reported in cases of splenic torsion, and identification of spherocytes on blood film evaluation warrants further investigation. The cause of spherocytosis in splenic torsion remains unknown but may be associated with microangiopathic fragmentation injury.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of 4 cases of splenic torsion with associated spherocytosis.

ANIMALS

4 client-owned dogs with spherocytosis and splenic torsion.

CLINICAL PRESENTATION

Each dog presented with nonspecific clinical signs, and 3 out of 4 dogs were anemic on presentation.

RESULTS

The diagnosis of splenic torsion was made with abdominal ultrasound or CT and confirmed during exploratory laparotomy. Spherocytosis was described as occasional (patient 1), rare (patient 2), and low number (patients 3 and 4). Two dogs survived to hospital discharge, and 2 dogs died following cardiorespiratory arrest.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Spherocytosis has not previously been reported in cases of splenic torsion, and identification of spherocytes on blood film evaluation warrants further investigation. The cause of spherocytosis in splenic torsion remains unknown but may be associated with microangiopathic fragmentation injury.

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