Surgical approach and presence of preoperative pleural effusion impact thoracostomy tube usage in dogs and cats following thoracic surgery for suspected neoplasia

Carley Johnson Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

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Janis Lapsley Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

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Hunter Piegols Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

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Laura Selmic Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

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 BVetMed, MPH, DACVS

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess factors associated with increased pleural fluid and air evacuation, longer duration of thoracostomy tube usage, and longer hospitalization in dogs and cats following surgery for thoracic neoplasms.

ANIMALS

62 dogs and 10 cats.

METHODS

Medical records were reviewed for dogs and cats undergoing thoracic surgeries between August 1, 2019, and June 30, 2023, for resection of suspected neoplasia in which a thoracostomy tube was placed. Data collected included patient signalment, type of procedure performed, histologic diagnosis of the primary mass removed, volume of fluid and air evacuated from the thoracostomy tube, and time in hospital.

RESULTS

Median sternotomy was associated with increased total fluid evacuation (median, 12.1 mL/kg; IQR, 15.4 mL/kg; P = .012), whereas rib resection was associated with increased total air evacuation (median, 2.1 mL/kg; IQR, 13.6 mL/kg; P = .06). The presence of preoperative pleural effusion was associated with higher total fluid evacuation (20.6 mL/kg; IQR, 32.1 mL/kg; P = .009), longer duration with a thoracostomy tube in place (42.5 hours; IQR, 41.9 hours; P = .027), and longer hospitalization period (61 hours; IQR, 52.8 hours; P = .025). Cats had a thoracostomy tube in place for a longer time compared to dogs (median, 42.6 hours; IQR, 23.5 hours; P = .043).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Animals undergoing median sternotomy and rib resection may be expected to have higher fluid and air volumes, respectively, evacuated postoperatively. This often leads to an increased duration of thoracostomy tube usage and a longer period of hospitalization.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess factors associated with increased pleural fluid and air evacuation, longer duration of thoracostomy tube usage, and longer hospitalization in dogs and cats following surgery for thoracic neoplasms.

ANIMALS

62 dogs and 10 cats.

METHODS

Medical records were reviewed for dogs and cats undergoing thoracic surgeries between August 1, 2019, and June 30, 2023, for resection of suspected neoplasia in which a thoracostomy tube was placed. Data collected included patient signalment, type of procedure performed, histologic diagnosis of the primary mass removed, volume of fluid and air evacuated from the thoracostomy tube, and time in hospital.

RESULTS

Median sternotomy was associated with increased total fluid evacuation (median, 12.1 mL/kg; IQR, 15.4 mL/kg; P = .012), whereas rib resection was associated with increased total air evacuation (median, 2.1 mL/kg; IQR, 13.6 mL/kg; P = .06). The presence of preoperative pleural effusion was associated with higher total fluid evacuation (20.6 mL/kg; IQR, 32.1 mL/kg; P = .009), longer duration with a thoracostomy tube in place (42.5 hours; IQR, 41.9 hours; P = .027), and longer hospitalization period (61 hours; IQR, 52.8 hours; P = .025). Cats had a thoracostomy tube in place for a longer time compared to dogs (median, 42.6 hours; IQR, 23.5 hours; P = .043).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Animals undergoing median sternotomy and rib resection may be expected to have higher fluid and air volumes, respectively, evacuated postoperatively. This often leads to an increased duration of thoracostomy tube usage and a longer period of hospitalization.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 145 KB)
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