Intestinal full-thickness needle-core biopsy via laparotomy is safe, rapid, and effective and less invasive than standard incisional biopsy in dogs and cats

Adrien Maggiar Centre Hospitalier Vétérinaire Atlantia, Nantes, France

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Juliette Andréjak-Bénit Statibio, Saint-Fuscien, France

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Julien Miclard IHP Véto, Nantes, France

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Delphine Sarran Centre Hospitalier Vétérinaire Atlantia, Nantes, France

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Jean-Philippe Billet Centre Hospitalier Vétérinaire Atlantia, Nantes, France

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the intestinal full-thickness needle-core biopsy technique via abdominal laparotomy outcomes and compare the histopathological and immunohistochemical diagnosis with standard incisional intestinal biopsy technique in dogs and cats.

ANIMALS

3 dogs and 17 cats.

METHODS

Client-owned dogs and cats were prospectively enrolled if intestinal full-thickness biopsies were indicated for the diagnosis of diffuse chronic intestinal diseases following ultrasonography. The study period extended from June 2021 to December 2022. All animals underwent intestinal biopsies with both techniques (needle-core biopsy and standard incisional biopsy) via abdominal laparotomy. Data collected included clinical signs, biopsy collection times, complications, and histopathologic and immunohistochemical findings. A minimum follow-up of 14 days was required.

RESULTS

The main clinical sign at presentation was chronic vomiting (65%). Mean needle-core biopsy collection time (262 seconds) was significantly shorter than standard incisional biopsy collection time (599 seconds; P < .000001). The incidence of minor complications was 10% (inflammation of the skin surgical site secondary to licking). One catastrophic complication occurred on a standard incisional biopsy site in 1 cat in a context of bile peritonitis (5% of all cases). There were no complications associated with the needle-core biopsy. All but 1 cat were discharged, with a median of 2 days (range, 1 to 4 days) after surgery. The diagnoses resulting from both techniques were 100% concordant for the distinction between inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal lymphoma via histopathology and immunochemistry.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Needle-core biopsy is safe, rapid, and effective and is less invasive than standard incisional biopsy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the intestinal full-thickness needle-core biopsy technique via abdominal laparotomy outcomes and compare the histopathological and immunohistochemical diagnosis with standard incisional intestinal biopsy technique in dogs and cats.

ANIMALS

3 dogs and 17 cats.

METHODS

Client-owned dogs and cats were prospectively enrolled if intestinal full-thickness biopsies were indicated for the diagnosis of diffuse chronic intestinal diseases following ultrasonography. The study period extended from June 2021 to December 2022. All animals underwent intestinal biopsies with both techniques (needle-core biopsy and standard incisional biopsy) via abdominal laparotomy. Data collected included clinical signs, biopsy collection times, complications, and histopathologic and immunohistochemical findings. A minimum follow-up of 14 days was required.

RESULTS

The main clinical sign at presentation was chronic vomiting (65%). Mean needle-core biopsy collection time (262 seconds) was significantly shorter than standard incisional biopsy collection time (599 seconds; P < .000001). The incidence of minor complications was 10% (inflammation of the skin surgical site secondary to licking). One catastrophic complication occurred on a standard incisional biopsy site in 1 cat in a context of bile peritonitis (5% of all cases). There were no complications associated with the needle-core biopsy. All but 1 cat were discharged, with a median of 2 days (range, 1 to 4 days) after surgery. The diagnoses resulting from both techniques were 100% concordant for the distinction between inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal lymphoma via histopathology and immunochemistry.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Needle-core biopsy is safe, rapid, and effective and is less invasive than standard incisional biopsy.

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Maggiar (adrien.maggiar@gmail.com)
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