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Animal Behavior Case of the Month

Sun-A Kim DVM, MS1 and Melissa J. Bain DVM, DACVB, MS, DACAW2
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  • 1 Clinical Animal Behavior Service, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Chungbuk National University, Korea
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
Signalment

A 1-year-old 7.0-kg castrated male Shiba Inu dog.

History

The dog was presented for tail chasing, self-injurious behavior, and fearful behavior when having a collar placed onto him or when he sensed a mobile phone vibration. He was obtained from a breeder at 12 weeks of age and lived with a couple in a single-family home. The dog’s tail-chasing behavior, without the presence of any triggers, was noticed immediately after acquisition. At first, the behavior lasted 1 minute in duration twice daily, but over 8 months, the frequency and duration increased to approximately 10 minutes in duration 5 times

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Kim (sunkim.dvm@gmail.com)

In collaboration with the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists