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Traumatic exungulation in cattle: ten cases (1993–2018)

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  • 1 From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biological Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 2 From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe clinical findings, treatments, and outcomes for cattle with complete traumatic exungulation.

ANIMALS

10 bovines.

PROCEDURES

Record databases of 2 teaching hospitals were searched to identify cattle treated for traumatic exungulation between January 1993 and December 2018. Information about signalment, clinical signs and findings, treatment, and outcome was extracted from the records or obtained by telephone communication with the owner.

RESULTS

Records for 5 bulls, 4 heifers, and 1 cow with a median age of 2 years (range, 1 day to 10 years) and weight of 379.1 kg (range, 30 to 909.1 kg) were reviewed. Duration of clinical signs ranged from ≤ 24 hours to 3.5 days. Five of 7 animals had a lameness score > 3/5. Complete exungulation occurred in 6 medial digits (3 hind limbs and 3 forelimbs) and 5 lateral digits (1 hind limb and 4 forelimbs); 1 calf had complete exungulation of both digits of a forelimb. Treatments included bandaging (n = 9), antimicrobials (9), anti-inflammatories (8), hoof block application to the adjacent digit (7), regional anesthesia (6), cast application (4), curettage of the third phalanx (3), regional antimicrobial perfusion (1), and local application of antimicrobial-impregnated beads (1). All 7 cattle with long-term (≥ 9 months) information available returned to their intended function; 6 had no residual lameness, and 3 required regular corrective trimming of the affected digit.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested the prognosis for long-term survival and return to intended function is fair to good for cattle with complete exungulation.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe clinical findings, treatments, and outcomes for cattle with complete traumatic exungulation.

ANIMALS

10 bovines.

PROCEDURES

Record databases of 2 teaching hospitals were searched to identify cattle treated for traumatic exungulation between January 1993 and December 2018. Information about signalment, clinical signs and findings, treatment, and outcome was extracted from the records or obtained by telephone communication with the owner.

RESULTS

Records for 5 bulls, 4 heifers, and 1 cow with a median age of 2 years (range, 1 day to 10 years) and weight of 379.1 kg (range, 30 to 909.1 kg) were reviewed. Duration of clinical signs ranged from ≤ 24 hours to 3.5 days. Five of 7 animals had a lameness score > 3/5. Complete exungulation occurred in 6 medial digits (3 hind limbs and 3 forelimbs) and 5 lateral digits (1 hind limb and 4 forelimbs); 1 calf had complete exungulation of both digits of a forelimb. Treatments included bandaging (n = 9), antimicrobials (9), anti-inflammatories (8), hoof block application to the adjacent digit (7), regional anesthesia (6), cast application (4), curettage of the third phalanx (3), regional antimicrobial perfusion (1), and local application of antimicrobial-impregnated beads (1). All 7 cattle with long-term (≥ 9 months) information available returned to their intended function; 6 had no residual lameness, and 3 required regular corrective trimming of the affected digit.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested the prognosis for long-term survival and return to intended function is fair to good for cattle with complete exungulation.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Simpson (katie.simpson@colostate.edu).