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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
  • | 2 Department of Large Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
History

An 8-month-old 25.7-kg sexually intact male Standard Xoloitzcuintli was referred for evaluation of persistent bacterial urinary tract infections. The dog was acquired at 5 months of age from a breeder and had at that time recently completed a course of antimicrobials for a urinary tract infection. After adoption, pollakiuria and inappropriate urination indoors were noted. The dog was presented to the referring veterinarian, and results of urinalysis on a urine sample obtained via cystocentesis were consistent with a urinary tract infection (cocci and WBC in the sediment). The dog was prescribed amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (13.4 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Grimes (jgrimes@uga.edu)

In collaboration with the American College of Veterinary Radiology